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'LI  B  RARY 

OF   THE 

UN  IVER.SITY 
OF    1LLI  NOIS 


977.335 

D29h 

v.£ 


I.H.S. 


HISTORY 


of 


WHITESIDE  COUNTY,  ILLINOIS 


From  Its  Earliest  Settlement  to  1908 


•{V, 
By  WILLIAM  W.  DAVIS,  M.  A. 


ILLUSTRATED 


With  Biographical  Sketches  of  some  Prominent  Citizens  of  the  County 


VOL.  II 


Chicago: 

THE    PIONEER    PUBLISHING    CO. 
1908 


LIBRARY 

OF  THE 

UNIVERSITY  OF  ILLINOIS 


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BIOGRAPHICAL 


HON.  TYLER  McWHOETER. 

Hon.  Tyler  McWhorter,  coming  to  Whiteside  county  in  pioneer  days, 
was  closely  associated  with  its  early  development  and  later  progress  and  left 
the  impress  of  his  individuality  upon  its  growth  and  development.  His 
labors  were  a  beneficial  factor  in  public  life,  not  only  in  the  material  interests 
of  the  county  but  in  its  political  progress  as  well,  and  he  was  honored  by  his 
fellow  townsmen  with  election  to  the  state  legislature,  where  he  represented 
his  district  most  creditably. 

Mr.  McWhorter  was  a  native  of  Ohio,  but  was  reared  to  manhood  in 
Indiana,  to  which  state  he  removed  in  his  early  boyhood  with  his  parents, 
John  and  Mary  (Lynn)  McWhorter,  the  former  a  native  of  Pennsylvania 
and  the  latter  of  West  Virginia.  John  McWhorter  was  a  descendant  of 
Thomas  McWhorter,  who  came  from  Scotland  before  the  French  and  Indian 
war  and  took  up  his  abode  in  New  Jersey.  His  children  were  Gilbert,  Hugh 
and  Mary,  the  last  named  becoming  the  wife  of  William  Bucha'nan.  Hugh 
McWhorter  married  Keziah  Tyler  and  they  had  six  children — Thomas, 
Tyler,  Betsey,  James,  Keziah  and  John.  Of  this  family  Tyler  was  the  father 
of  John  McWhorter  and  the  grandfather  of  our  subject.  He  married  and 
settled  in  Indiana,  where  was  born  unto  him  a  son,  John  McWhorter,  The 
last  named,  arriving  at  years  of  maturity,  wedded  Mary  Lynn  and  their 
children  were  Lynn,  Francis,  Henry,  Tyler,  Keziah  and  Mary. 

Reared  to  manhood  under  the  parental  roof,  Tyler  McWhorter  early 
became  familiar  with  the  experiences  of  pioneer  life  in  Indiana,  as  he  aided 
in  the  development  of  new  land  there  and  its  further  cultivation  as  it  was 
transformed  into  productive  fields.  He  had  no  special  advantages  in  his 
youth;  in  fact,  his  opportunities  were  rather  limited  than  otherwise.  During 
his  boyhood  days  he  pursued  his  studies  in  a  log  schoolhouse  in  Indiana  and 


i i 


644  HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY 

his  father,  who  was  a  teacher,  assisted  him  in  acquiring  a  good  practical  edu- 
cation. 

He  remained  at  home  until  his  marriage,  which  was  celebrated  Novem- 
ber 28,  1849,  Miss  Rhoda  A.  Ward  becoming  his  wife.  She  was  born  near 
Cincinnati,  Ohio,  and  is  a  daughter  of  Elias  and  Rhoda  (Miller)  Ward,  who 
were  natives  of  New  Jersey.  Her  maternal  grandfather  was  Major  Luke 
Miller,  who  served  with  distinction  in  the  Colonial  army  during  the  Revolu- 
tionary war.  He  spent  his  entire  life  in  Madison,  New  Jersey,  dying  in  the 
house  in  which  he  was  born.  He  was  a  farmer  and  blacksmith  by  occupa- 
tion and  lived  a  life  of  industry.  His  family  numbered  two  sons  and  six 
daughters.  The  paternal  grandfather  of  Mrs.  Rhoda  A.  McWhorter  was 
Israel  Ward,  a  native  of  New  Jersey,  who  made  farming  his  life  work.  In 
1811,  accompanied  by  his  family,  he  removed  to  Hamilton  county,  Ohio, 
where  he  bought  land  for  himself  and  his  sons.  He  had  a  family  of  six  sons 
and  two  daughters.  His  son,  Elias  Ward,  the  father  of  Mrs.  McWhorter,  was 
a  soldier  of  the  war  of  1812  and  for  his  services  received  a  land  warrant.  For 
a  number  of  years  he  followed  the  carriage-trimmer's  trade  in  Cincinnati,  but 
finally  selling  his  farm  in  Ohio  removed  to  Franklin  county,  Indiana,  where 
he  lived  until  a  few  years  prior  to  his  death.  He  then  came  to  Whiteside 
county,  Illinois,  to  make  his  home  with  Mr.  and  Mrs.  MeWhorter  and  some 
of  his  other  children  and  here  died  September  6,  1870.  His  family  num- 
bered twelve  children  and,  with  the  exception  of  one  who  died  in  infancy, 
all  reached  years  of  maturity,  were  married  and  reared  families  of  their  own. 
Only  two,  however,  are  now  living — Mrs.  McWhorter  and  Lewis  B.  Ward, 
who  resides  in  Rock  Falls,  this  county. 

Following  his  marriage  Tyler  McWhorter  continued  to  reside  in  Indiana 
until  1854,  when  he  started  for  Whiteside  county,  Illinois.  He  made  the 
journey  by  team,  bringing  with  him  his  household  goods,  after  which  he 
returned  for  his  wife  and  three  little  children.  This  time  they  traveled  by 
rail  to  Dixon  and  thence  by  team  to  Sterling.  From  that  time  forward  until 
his  death  Tyler  McWhorter  was  a  prominent  and  influential  citizen  of  this 
part  of  the  state.  The  first  farm  he  purchased  comprised  three  hundred  and 
twenty  acres  of  land,  which  he  bought  from  Jonathan  Banes,  who  had  secured 
it  from  the  government.  The  purchase  price  was  three  dollars  per  acre.  Not 
a  furrow  had  been  turned  upon  the  place  and  the  land  was  in  the  condition 
in  which  it  came  from  the  hand  of  nature.  Mr.  McWhorter  first  erected  a 
small  frame  house,  which  is  still  standing  and  is  yet  in  possession  of  the 
family.  He  performed  the  arduous  task  of  developing  new  land  and  con- 
verting raw  prairie  into  a  cultivable  farm  and  in  the  course  of  years,  as  the 
result  of  his  indefatigable  labor,  he  had  one  of  the  finest  and  best  cultivated 
farms  in  his  township,  bringing  his  land  under  a  high  state  of  development 
and  adding  to  it  many  modern  improvements  and  equipments.  All  these, 
however,  involved  much  earnest  toil  and  conditions  of  life  in  the  community 
afforded  no  such  conveniences  and  advantages  as  are  now  to  be  obtained. 
The  farm  machinery  was  very  crude  and  much  of  the  labor  now  done  by 
improved  agricultural  implements  was  then  done  by  hand.  His  neighbors, 


(I" 

HISTORY    OF   WHITESIDE    COUNTY  645 

too,  were  widely  scattered.  Only  here  and  there  had  a  settlement  been  made 
and  many  of  the  homes  were  built  of  logs.  As  a  farmer  Mr.  McWhorter  took 
a  deep  interest  in  all  that  pertained  to  the  advancement  of  agricultural  and 
stock-raising  interests  and,  stimulated  by  his  example  and  words  of  encour- 
agement, many  other  farmers  turned  their  attention  to  the  improvement  of 
their  land  and  the  advancement  of  their  live-stock  interests  according  to  his 
methods.  His  labors  were  thus  of  direct  benefit  to  his  fellowmen.  At  one 
time  he  was  the  owner  of  five  hundred  and  twenty  acres  in  Montmorency 
township,  while  in  Kossuth  county,  Iowa,  he  had  six  hundred  and  forty  acres. 
He  lived  upon  his  farm  in  this  county,  however,  until  his  death  and  was  one 
of  the  most  prominent  agriculturists  of  northern  Illinois. 

Unto  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Tyler  McWhorter  were  born  four  sons  and  three 
daughters — Mary,  now  the  wife  of  John  Jamison,  of  Algona,  Iowa;  Ellis, 
who  is  living  near  Algona;  Anna,  the  widow  of  Edgar  Woods,  of  Mont- 
morency township,  Whiteside  county;  John  E.,  of  Burt,  Iowa;  William  L., 
who  is  represented  elsewhere  in  this  volume;  Charlotte  L.,  the  wife  of  Fred 
Buell,  of  Sheridan,  Wyoming;  and  LeRoy  S.,  who  makes  his  home  near  Burt, 
Iowa. 

Mr.  McWhorter  through  the  period  of  his  residence  in  this  county  was 
recognized  as  a  mos'c  public-spirited  man  and  was  frequently  honored  with 
positions  of  public  trust  and  responsibility.  From  1868  until  1874  he  served 
as  supervisor  of  the  town  and  both  prior  and  subsequent  to  that  period  he 
held  other  offices.  In.  the  fall  of  1874  he  received  the  unanimous  nomination 
of  the  republicans  for  the  position  of  representative  in  the  twenty-ninth  gen- 
eral assembly  and  such  was  his  personal  popularity  and  the  confidence  reposed 
in  him  that  he  was  elected  by  a  large  majority.  He  served  on  several  of  the 
more  important  committees  of  the  house  and  gave  to  the  matters  which  came 
before  the  assembly  the  careful  consideration  necessary  to  arrive  at  a  proper 
conclusion  as  to  their  merits.  He  was  an  earnest  working  member  of  the 
house  and  was  connected  with  considerable  important  constructive  legisla- 
tion. In  community  affairs  he  took  a  helpful  part  and  his  influence  and  aid 
were  always  given  on  the  side  of  reform,  progress  and  advancement,  while 
his  many  good  qualities  made  him  one  of  the  foremost  citizens  of  the  county. 
He  was  instrumental  in  securing  one  of  the  first  schools  in  Montmorency 
township  and  served  as  school  director  for  fifteen  years,  the  cause  of  education 
receiving  from  him  tangible  aid.  He  was  a  recognized  leader  in  the  local 
ranks  of  the  party  and  became  a  leading  and  active  member  of  the  Methodist 
Episcopal  church.  His  death  occurred  on  the  5th  of  May,  1889,  when  he 
was  sixty-four  years  of  age,  and  his  wife,  who  survives  him,  has  been  a  resi- 
dent of  Sterling  since  1890. 

Though  nineteen  years  have  come  and  gone  since  Tyler  McWhorter 
passed  from  the  scene  of  earthly  activities  the  influence  of  his  life  and  labors 
has  not  ceased  to  be  felt.  His  example  was  well  worthy  of  emulation  and 
the  character  of  his  work  made  him  a  citizen  whom  to  know  was  to  respect 
and  honor.  He  lived  to  witness  the  transformation  wrought  in  this  county 
and  was  an  active  factor  in  the  work  of  improvement  as  it  was  carried  for- 


640  HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY 

ward.  His  own  life  was  at  all  times  characterized  by  an  orderly  progression, 
and  the  motives  which  guided  his  conduct  gained  for  him  an  unsullied  repu- 
tation. 

i     '  i       j       • 


EDWIN   WHITFORD   MITCHELL. 

Edwin  Whitford  Mitchell  is  operating  his  father's  farm  on  section  13. 
Mount  Pleasant  township,  renting  this  tract  of  two  hundred  and  eighty 
acres  of  rich  and  productive  land,  while  his  father,  Charles  Winegar  Mitchell, 
resides  in  Morrison,  having  retired  from  active  business  life.  C.  W.  Mitchell 
was  born  in  Cayuga  county,  New  York,  December  18,  1843,  and  is  a  son 
of  Edward  R.  and  Harriet  (Winegar)  Mitchell,  natives  of  Madison  and 
Onondaga  counties,  New  York,  respectively.  Edward  R.  Mitchell  was  of 
English  lineage  and  of  Quaker  ancestry.  He  was  a  blacksmith  and,  remov- 
ing to  Whiteside  county  in  1865,  settled  in  Mount  Pleasant  township,  where 
he  purchased  one  hundred  and  twenty  a«res  of  land,  upon  which  he  spent 
his  remaining  days,  dying  in  1892,  at  the  age  of  eighty-three  years.  His 
religious  faith  was  that  of  the  Society  of  Friends  and  his  political  support  was 
given  to  the  whig  party  until  he  joined  the  ranks  of  the  new  republican  party. 
His  wife,  who  was  born  in  1810,  and  died  in  1888,  came  of  Swiss  ancestry. 
The  first  of  the  family  to  come  to  America  located  in  Lee,  Massachusetts, 
early  in  the  seventeenth  century.  Her  parents  were  Samuel  and  Tabitha 
(Crocker)  Winegar,  the  former  a  farmer  by  occupation.  Mrs.  Mitchell  was 
also  a  relative  of  Captain  Clark,  a  soldier  of  the  Revolutionary  war.  In 
childhood  days  Mrs.  Edward  Mitchell  was  baptized  in  the  Episcopal  church 
but  later  became  a  member  of  the  Universalist  church.  By  her  marriage 
she  had  three  children:  Amanda,  the  wife  of  Charles  Ward,  a  farmer  of 
Niagara  county,  New  York,  who  came  to  Illinois  in  1863  and  settled  in 
Mount  Pleasant  township,  Whiteside  county,  where  he  made  his  home  until 
his  death;  Charles  W.,  father  of  our  subject;  and  Lydia,  who  married  Nathan 
Mitchell,  of  Elgin,  Illinois,  who  was  a  railroad  engineer  but  is  now  deceased. 
She  has  since  married  Theodore  G.  Knox,  now  a  retired  farmer  of  Colorado 
Springs,  Colorado. 

Charles  W.  Mitchell  was  reared  on  a  farm  and  educated  in  the  public 
schools  of  Syracuse,  New  York,  also  spending  one  term  in  the  Fulton  Sem- 
inary, at  Fulton.  New  York.  He  taught  school  for  a  year  in  Oswego  county, 
New  York.  In  the  fall  of  1864,  when  twenty  years  of  age,  he  enlisted  at 
Cicero,  New  York,  in  Company  D,  One  Hundred  and  Eighty-fifth  New  York 
Volunteer  Infantry,  and  served  until  the  end  of  the  war,  being  mustered  out 
near  Washington.  He  participated  in  the  engagements  in  front  of  Peters- 
burg during  the  siege  and  was  also  in  the  battle  of  Quakers  Farm,  Gravelly 
Run  and  Hatcher;  Run.  He  was  at  Appomattox  and  the  flag  of  truce  from 
Lee  came  into  the  battle  line  of  the  One  Hundred  and  Eighty-fifth  Regiment. 
At  the  time  of  the  surrender  Mr.  Mitchell  had  but  a  single  hardtack,  which 
he  gave  to  a  Confederate  in  exchange  for  a  Palmetto  button  off  his  coat.  It 
was  two  davs  after  this  before  rations  were  issued  to  Mr.  Mitchell  and  his 


HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY  647 

comrades.  His  division  remained  at  Appomattox  and  the  munitions  from 
Lee's  army  were  placed  in  their  charge.  From  Appomattox  they  went  to 
Richmond,  thence  to  Washington,  participating  in  the  grand  review,  the 
regiment  camping  at  Arlington,  the  former  home  of  General  Robert  E.  Lee. 
In  July,  1865,  C.  W.  Mitchell  came  to  Illinois,  settling  in  Mount  Pleas- 
ant township,  where  with  his  father  he  bought  one  hundred  and  twenty 
acres  of  land,  while  subsequently  he  purchased  two  eighty  acre  tracts  and 
is  now  the  owner  of  a  valuable  farming  property  of  two  hundred  and  eighty 
acres  of  finely  improved  land.  Year  after  year  he  carried  on  farming  with 
good  success  until  1903,  when  he  retired  to  Morrison  and  is  now  occupying 
one  of  the  attractive  homes  of  that  city. 

C.  W.  Mitchell  was  married  in  June,  1869,  to  Lucy  Whitford,  who  was 
born  in  Huron  county,  Ohio,  February  6,  1844,  a  daughter  of  Philo  and  Eliz- 
abeth (Swift)  Whitford,  of  Scotch-Irish  ancestry.  Her  father  was  a  car- 
penter and  contractor,  who  removed  from  De  Ruyter,  New  York,  to  Ohio 
at  a  later  day.  Unto  Mr.  and  Mrs.  C.  W.  Mitchell  were  born  three  children : 
Mary  E..  who  became  the  wife  of  Dr.  John  F.  Stokes,  a  dentist  of  Rockford, 
and  died  June  25,  1907,  leaving  three  children ;  Edwin  W.,  of  this  review ;  and 
Anna  L.,  the  wife  of  Rev.  William  E.  Levitt,  a  minister  of  the  Universalist 
church  in  Prince  Edwards  county,  Ontario.  The  parents  are  members  of  "the 
Universalist  church  and  Mr.  Mitchell  belongs  to  Alpheus  Clarke  Post,  G.  A.  R., 
of  which  he  is  a  past  commander.  In  politics  he  is  a  stalwart  republican  and 
has  held  some  local  offices.  For  forty  years  he  has  kept  a  diary  and  this  volume 
has  often  been  resorted  to  to  settle  disputes  among  the  neighbors  concerning 
events  of  the  locality. 

Edwin  W.  Mitchell,  whose  name  introduces  this  record,  was  born  on  the 
farm  he  now  cultivates,  January  29.  1874.  It  remained  his  playground  in 
youth  and  his  training  school  for  life's  practical  and  responsible  duties.  He 
was  afforded  liberal  educational  privileges  and  after  his  graduation  from 
the  Morrison  high  school,  spent  two  years  in  the  State  University  at  Urbana. 
He  then  returned  to  the  farm  and  has  since  devoted  his  time  and  energies 
to  the  further  development  and  improvement  of  the  fields.  He  has  also  for 
the  past  year  engaged  in  the  breeding  of  thoroughbred  shorthorn  cattle  and 
each  winter  feeds  a  large  number  of  cattle,  for  which  he  finds  a  ready  sale 
on  the  market.  In  his  business  affairs  he  displays  an  aptitude  for  successful 
management  and  his  enterprise  has  brought  him  gratifying  success. 

In  October,  1902,  was  celebrated  the  marriage  of  Edwin  W.  Mitchell 
and  Miss  Julia  Eggieston,  who  was  born  in  Chicago,  June  16,  1881,  a 
daughter  of  George  and  Harriet  (Howard)  Eggieston,  whose  family  num- 
bered three  daughters,  Mrs.  Mitchell  being  the  youngest.  Her  sisters  are: 
Jerusha,  now  the  wife  of  Fred  Miller,  of  Sterling;  and  May,  the  wife  of 
Clyde  C.  Kadel,  of  Rock  Falls.  Mrs.  Mitchell  was  reared  in  Sterling  and 
Rock  Falls  and  was  graduated  from  the  high  school  in  the  latter  city.  She 
is  a  lady  of  natural  culture  and  refinement  and  presides  with  gracious  hospi- 
tality over  her  pleasant  home.  By  her  marriage  she  has  become  the  mother 
of  two  children:  Dorothy  Eggieston,  born  September  18,  1903;  and  Donald 
Whitford,  July  10,  1906. 


648  HISTORY   OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY 

In  his  political  views  Mr.  Mitchell  is  an  earnest  republican  but  the 
honors  and  emoluments  of  office  have  no  attraction  for  him,  as  he  finds  that 
the  cultivation  of  a  farm  of  two  hundred  and  eighty  acres  makes  heavy 
demands  upon  his  time  and  energies.  He  is,  however,  meeting  with  success 
that  is  well  merited.  Since  the  21st  of  August,  1899,  he  has  been  a  member 
of  Dunlap  Lodge,  No.  321,  A.  F.  &  A.  M.,  of  Morrison,  while  both  he  and 
his  wife  are  connected  with  the  Eastern  Star.  As  representatives  of  pioneer 
families  of  the  county  they  are  well  known  and  Mr.  Mitchell  is  a  young, 
energetic  farmer  whose  business  capacity  and  executive  force  are  Avell  demon- 
strated in  his  farming  operations. 


t  JOHN  M.  GALT. 

Among  those  who,  while  active  factors  in  the  world,  made  a  record  that 
time  cannot  efface,  while  those  who  knew  him  are  still  connected  with  the 
community  in  which  he  lived,  is  numbered  John  M.  Gait.  His  business 
interests  became  an  important  element  in  the  commercial  development  of 
Sterling  and  the  strong  traits  of  his  character  left  their  impress  for  good  upon 
public  life. 

Born  in  Strasburg,  Pennsylvania,  July  31,  1835,  he  was  a  son  of  William 
and  Mary  Ann  (Thomas)  Gait,  likewise  natives  of  the  Keystone  state.  .In 
their  family  were  ten  children:  Mrs.  Amanda  Crawford,  now  a  widow; 
Thomas  A.,  a  resident  of  Sterling;  John  M.,  deceased;  William  J.,  who  was  a 
physician  and  has  also  passed  away;  Azariah  T.,  living  in  Chicago;  Mrs. 
Isabelle  McCloy,  the  deceased  wife  of  Alexander  T.  McCloy,  of  Sterling;  Zad- 
dock,  deceased;  Mrs.  Julia  A.  Lowrie,  who  has  also  been  called  from  this 
life;  Ruth  A.,  the  widow  of  Lott  S.  Pennington,  and  one  who  died  in  infancy. 

John  M.  Gait  became  one  of  the  early  settlers  of  Sterling.  His  boyhood 
and  youth  were  passed  in  Pennsylvania,  where  he  acquired  his  education, 
and  when  a  young  man  he  made  his  way  westward  to  Whiteside  county, 
Illinois,  and  engaged  first  in  the  hardware  business  in  Sterling.  Later  he 
turned  his  attention  to  the  manufacture  of  buggies,  in  which  he  successfully 
continued  for  many  years.  Watchful  of  opportunity,  he  constantly  extended 
the  sphere  of  his  activities  and  with  his  brother,  T.  A.  Gait,  established  a 
bank,  known  as  Gait  Brothers  Bank.  This  became  a  strong  financial  enter- 
prise of  the  county  and  after  a  connection  therewith  of  some  length,  John  M. 
Gait  sold  his  interest  to  George  S.  Tracy.  He  then  became  a  stockholder  in 
the  Eureka  Manufacturing  Company,  established  for  the  manufacture  of 
mill  machinery  and  school  furniture,  and  in  addition  thereto  became  an 
extensive  dealer  in  real  estate.  At  a  later  date  he  disposed  of  his  manufactur- 
ing interests  and  concentrated  his  entire  time  and  attention  upon  his  property 
investments,  which  included  both  city  and  country  property.  He  was  a  man 
of  keen  business  discernment  and  sound  judgment,  recognizing  opportunities 
which  others  pass  by  heedlessly  and  so  directing  his  energies  that  desired 
results  were  accomplished.  Thus  year  by  year  he  advanced  in  the  business 


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OF  THE 
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HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY  651 

world  and  while  manufacturing,  individual  prosperity  also  contributed  to  the 
general  welfare. 

On  the  22d  of  January,  1868,  John  M.  Gait  was  united  in  marriage  to 
Miss  Elizabeth  McPherran,  a  daughter  of  Andrew  and  Maria  (Brubaker) 
McPherran,  both  of  whom  were  natives  of  Pennsylvania.  Her  father  was 
the  first  mayor  of  Dixon,  Illinois,  and  from  that  city  removed  to  Chicago, 
where  his  remaining  days  were  passed.  Unto  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Gait  were  born 
six  children :  Bessie  R.,  now  the  wife  of  Edward  J.  Bowman,  of  Anaconda, 
Montana;  Kathryn  M.,  who  is  living  in  Sterling  with  her  mother;  William 
T.  and  John  M.,  both  of  this  city;  Julia,  the  wife  of  Dr.  Charles  G.  Beard, 
of  Sterling;  and  Elizabeth  Irma,  the  wife  of  Edgar  W.  Akin,  of  Carlisle,  In- 
diana. 

In  religious  faith  Mr.  Gait  was  a  Presbyterian  and  Mrs.  Gait  belongs 
to  the  same  church.  He  died  November  26,  1889,  at  the  age  of  fifty-four 
years.  It  seemed  to  those  who  knew  him  that  he  should  have  been  spared 
for  many  more  years  of  usefulness.  He  left  behind  him  an  untarnished 
record  as  a  business  man,  while  his  example  should  serve  as  a  source  of 
inspiration  and  encouragement  to  those  who,  without  aid,  wealth  or  influence 
at  the  outset  of  their  careers,  must  depend  upon  their  own  resources  to  win 
success.  Mr.  Gait  possessed  strong  purpose  and  laudable  ambition  and  with 
a  recognition  of  the  fact  that  in  America  labor  is  king  he  put  forth  inde- 
fatigable effort  to  win  the  success  which  he  knew  would  crown  all  intelli- 
gently directed  labor.  He  was,  moreover,  respected  for  the  many  sterling 
traits  which  he  displayed  aside  from  those  manifest  in  his  business  life  and 
his  name  came  to  be  honored  in  the  city'  of  his  residence. ) 


JACOB  J.  LUDENS. 

Jacob  J.  Ludens,  popular  as  one  of  the  younger  attorneys  practicing  at 
the  Whiteside  county  bar,  makes  his  home  in  Sterling.  He  was  born  at 
Garden  Plain,  this  county,  on  the  13th  of  October,  1877.  and  is  of  Holland 
lineage,  his  parents,  John  P.  and  Dorothy  (Vandenberg)  Ludens,  being 
natives  of  the  land  of  the  dykes.  The  father  came  to  America  in  1866,  set- 
tling at  Fulton,  this  county,  where  he  purchased  a  tract  of  land  and  engaged 
in  farming.  There  he  reared  his  family  and  continued  as  one  of  the  enter- 
prising and  representative  agriculturists  of  the  community  up  to  the  time 
of  his  death,  which  occurred  May  7,  1893,  when  he  was  fifty-five  years  of  age. 
Mrs.  Dorothy  Ludens  was  a  daughter  of  Jacob  Vandenberg,  who  was  a 
butcher  of  Holland.  Both  he  and  his  wife,  Mrs.  Jennie  Va*ndenberg,  died  in 
middle  life.  Mrs.  Ludens  still  survives  her  husband  and  now  lives  with 
her  youngest  daughter  in  Chicago.  She  holds  membership  in  the  Holland 
Reformed  church,  in  which  John  P.  Ludens  was  a  deacon  for  many  years. 
He  served  as  school  director  and  was  a  most  loyal  and  devoted  citizen  of  his 
adopted  country. 

His  family  numbered  eight  children :  Jennie,  the  deceased  wife  of  J.  B. 
Sterengberg;  Annie,  the  wife  of  David  B.  Sterengberg,  of  Ustick  township; 


652  HISTOKY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY 

Peter  M.,  who  is  living  in  Montana;  Elizabeth,  the  wife  of  Fred  M.  Dykema, 
of  Virden,  Illinois;  Harry  J.,  who  is  engaged  in  the  practice  of  law  at  Mor- 
rison, this  state;  Jacob  J.,  of  this  review;  John,  who  is  a  student  in  Knox 
College  at  Galesburg,  Illinois;  David,  a  civil  engineer  for  the  Northern 
Pacific  Eailroad  Company ;  and  Mattie.  the  wife  of  William  Parr,  of  Chicago. 

Jacob  J.  Ludens  was  reared  to  farm  life  in  this  county,  attending  the 
district  schools  in  his  early  boyhood  and  afterward  becoming  a  student  in 
the  Northern  Illinois  College  at  Fulton,  where  he  pursued  a  law  course.  He 
was  admitted  to  the  bar  in  1900  and  for  two  years  thereafter  engaged  in 
teaching  school.  He  then  took  up  the  active  work  of  the  profession,  opening 
a  law  office  at  Erie,  while  two  years  later  he  removed  to  Sterling,  where  since 
July,  1904,  he  has  continuously  practiced.  In  the  four  years  of  his  residence 
here  he  has  Avon  a  creditable  name  for  himself  as  a  lawyer  of  ability  and 
learning  who  prepares  his  cases  with  great  care  and  precision  and  presents 
his  cause  in  clear  and  logical  manner. 

On  the  9th  of  January,  1907,  was  celebrated  the  marriage  of  Mr.  Ludens 
and  Miss  Ermyn  I.  Smith,  a  daughter  of  Dr.  A.  C.  and  Rachel  Smith,  her 
father  being  one  of  the  oldest  practicing  physicians  of  Sterling.  Mr.  Ludens 
belongs  to  Rock  River  Lodge,  No.  612,  A.  F.  &  A.  M. ;  to  Sterling  Chapter, 
No.  57,  R.  A.  M.;  to  Sterling  Lodge,  No.  174,  I.  0.  0.  F.;  and  Corinthia 
Lodge,  No.  63,  K.  P.  His  wife  is  a  member  of  the  Baptist  church.  They 
are  interested  in  all  that  pertains  to  the  welfare  and  progress  of  the  com- 
munity. Mr.  Ludens  is  a  republican  in  politics  and  an  active  worker  in  the 
party,  serving  now  as  a  member  of  the  county  central  committee.  The  alert, 
enterprising  spirit  of  the  middle  west  is  manifest  in  all  that  he  does  and 
the  place  that  he  has  already  won  for  himself  in  professional  circles  argues, 
well  for  a  successful  future.  He  is  popular  as  a  citizen  and  as  an  attorney, 
and  he  and  his  wife  move  in  the  best  social  circles  of  the  city. 


MENSCH. 

Elmer  Ellsworth  Mensch,  one  of  the  representative  and  successful  farm- 
ers of  Jordan  township,  owes  his  advancement  in  the  business  world  entirely 
to  his  own  well  directed  efforts,  his  close  application  and  honorable  business- 
dealings.  He  was  born  October  19,  1862,  in  Montour  county,  Pennsylvania, 
the  family  home  being  near  Danville.  His  parents,  Andrew  and  Elizabeth 
(Miller)  Mensch,  were  also  natives  of  the  Keystone  state,  but  they  died 
when  their  son  was  quite  young  and  he  has  no  definite  knowledge  of  his 
grandparents  save  that  they,  too,  were  natives  of  Pennsylvania  and  lived  to- 
an  advanced  age,  the  grandfather,  Jacob  Mensch.  being  more  than  eighty 
years  of  age  at  the  time  of  his  demise. 

Elmer  Ellsworth  Mensch  was  one  of  three  children,  of  whom  two  are- 
now  living,  his  sister  being  Mrs.  Isabelle  Osman,  a  widow  residing  in  Colo- 
rado. At  the  time  of  the  Civil  war  Andrew  Mensch  joined  the  army  as  a 
soldier  and  gave  his  life  for  the  cause  of  the  Union.  He  enlisted  soon  after- 


HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY  653 

the  outbreak  of  hostilities  and  remained  continuously  at  the  front  until  the 
battle  of  Petersburg,  when  he  was  killed  in  the  engagement.  He  was  a  gal- 
lant soldier,  always  loyal  to  the  old  flag  and  ever  brave  in  support  of  the 
cause  which  he  espoused.  Following  his  demise  his  widow  became  the  wife 
of  John  Longenberger  and  to  them  were  born  four  children,  two  of  whom 
are  yet  living. 

Elmer  E.  Mensch  was  but  two  and  a  half  years  old  when  his  father  died. 
He  was  then  placed  in  the  care  of  his  cousin,  Jesse  Mensch,  with  whom 
he  remained  until  he  was  eleven  years  of  age.  During  the  last  two  years  of 
that  time  the  cousin  lived  in  town  and  his  daughter,  having  married  A.  D. 
Keefer,  settled  upon  the  farm  which  her  father  had  formerly  occupied  and 
Mr.  Mensch,  then  a  boy  of  nine  years,  went  to  live  on  the  farm.  He  con- 
tinued with  Mr.  and  Mrs,  Keefer  until  the  winter  of  1880,  when  he  came  to 
Whiteside  county,  settling  first  in  Jordan  township.  For  the  first  few  years 
after  his  arrival  here  he  was  employed  as  a  farm  hand  and  thus  provided 
for  his  support  and  laid  the  foundation  for  his  present  prosperity. 

On  the  8th  of  October,  1885,  was  celebrated  the  marriage  of  Mr.  Mensch 
and  Miss  Maggie  Wilger,  a  daughter  of  Joseph  and  Marie  (Grubb)  Wilger, 
who  were  natives  of  Germany  and  came  to  Pennsylvania  in  early  life.  After 
spending  a  few  years  there  they  removed  westward  to  Whiteside  county  and 
took  up  their  abode  in  Jordan  township.  Mr.  Wilger  died  December  10, 
1867,  when  about  sixty-one  years  of  age.  The  mother  survives  at  the  age  of 
seventy-six  years  and  is  a  remarkably  well  preserved  woman. 

Following  their  marriage  Mr.  Mensch  rented  a  farm  of  eighty  acres  in 
Palmyra  township,  but  that  did  not  prove  a  profitable  venture  and  a  year 
later  he  removed  to  the  A.  C.  John  place,  where  he  cultivated  one  hundred 
and  thirty  acres  of  land,  residing  thereon  for  four  years.  He  next  located 
on  the  John  Kratz  place,  of  two  hundred  and  eight  acres,  where  he  made 
his  home  for  nine  years,  and  on  the  1st  of  March,  1898,  he  bought  the 
present  place  of  seventy-six  acres.  It  had  very  few  improvements  upon  it 
at  that  time  but  is  now  a  beautiful  farm  property,  in  the  midst  of  which 
stands  a  pretty  home,  while  in  the  rear  are  fine  barns  and  outbuildings  and 
everything  about  the  place  is  in  excellent  condition — made  so  by  the  efforts 
of  Mr.  Mensch.  His  life  has  been  characterized  by  unfaltering  industry 
guided  by  sound  judgment.  He  early  came  to  realize  the  value  of  untiring 
labor  and  as  the  years  have  gone  by  he  has  achieved  the  measure  of  success 
which  ever  crowns  earnest,  persistent  labor. 

Unto  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Mensch  have  been  born  two  children:  Omer  E., 
who  is  now  nineteen  years  of  age  and  is  attending  business  college  at  Ster- 
ling in  preparation  for  a  commercial  career;  and  Marie,  a  bright  and  inter- 
esting little  daughter  of  four  years.  The  parents  are  well  known  in  the  com- 
munity and  have  an  extensive  circle  of  friends. 

Mr.  Mensch  has  always  been  deeply  interested  in  politics  and  in  public 
matters  relating  to  the  welfare  and  upbuilding  of  the  county.  He  votes 
with  the  republican  party  and  in  1896-7  filled  the  office  of  collector.  He  has 
served  for  many  years  on  the  school  board,  was  assessor  for  seven  years  and 
in  the  spring  of  1906  was  elected  supervisor  of  his  county.  The  offices  that 


654  HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY 

he  has  filled  have  found  in  him  a  faithful  incumbent,  ever  loyal  to  the  inter- 
ests of  the  public  and  promoting  general  progress  by  practical,  enterprising 
methods.  In  1906  he  was  one  of  the  federal  grand  jury  summoned  for  the 
celebrated  Standard  Oil  cases. 

Mr.  Mensch  is  a  charter  member  of  Penro.se  Camp,  No.  2203,  M.  W.  A., 
in  which  organization  he  held  the  office  of  clerk  for  nine  years.  Two  years 
later  he  filled  the  office  of  councilor  and  was  elected  to  represent  the  local 
lodge  in  the  county  organization  and  then  elected  to  the  state  convention. 
He  commenced  life  a  poor  boy  and  his  record  shows  what  can  be  accomplished 
when  one  has  the  will  to  dare  and  to  do.  He  is  now  pleasantly  situated  in 
life  and,  moreover,  he  enjoys  the  esteem  and  confidence  of  his  fellowmen  by 
reason  of  the'straightforward,  honorable  methods  that  he  has  followed  in  his 
business  career,  in  public  office  and  in  fact  in  every  relation  of  life. 


HENRY   BRESSLER. 

Henry  Bressler,  who  for  more  than  a  half  century  was  a  resident  of 
Whiteside  county,  was  closely  associated  with  its  agricultural  development 
and  at  all  times  upheld  its  political  and  legal  status.  He  stood  for  high 
standards  in  citizenship  and  in  private  life  as  well  and  the  energy  and  dili- 
gence which  he  displayed  enabled  him  to  rise  from  a  comparatively  humble 
position  in  the  business  world  to  one  of  prominence  and  affluence. 

He  was  born  in  Lancaster  county,  Pennsylvania,  May  3,  1826,  his 
parents  being  Isaac  and  Frances  (Neff)  Bressler,  also  natives  of  the  Keystone 
state.  The  former  was  a  son  of  Peter  Bressler,  who  came  from  Bressler, 
Germany,  with  his  parents  in  his  boyhood  days,  the  family  home  being 
established  in  Pennsylvania.  During  his  active  business  life  he  followed 
blacksmithing  and  farming.  The  maternal  grandfather,  Henry  Neff,  also 
a  farmer  by  occupation,  died  in  Lancaster  county,  Pennsylvania.  Their 
daughter,  Frances,  one  of  a  large  family,  gave  her  hand  in  marriage  to 
Isaac  Bressler,  son  of  Peter  and  Elizabeth  Bressler. 

After  following  farming  for  some  time  in  Lancaster  county,  Pennsyl- 
vania, Isaac  Bressler  removed  westward  to  Whiteside  county,  Illinois,  in  1856 
and  settled  on  a  tract  of  land  in  Jordan  township,  where  he  made  his  home 
until  called  to  his  final  rest  when  about  seventy-eight  years  of  age.  His  wife 
survived  him  and  was  more  than  ninety-two  years  of  age  at  the  time  of 
her  death.  Both  were  members  of  the  Mennonite  church  and  were  people 
of  the  highest  respectability.  Their  family  numbered  twelve  children,  eleven 
of  whom  reached  adult  age,  while  seven  are  now  living:  Eliza,  the  widow 
of  Henry  Bush,  of  Sterling;  Annie,  the  widow  of  Jacob  Meyers,  who  makes 
her  honie  in  Lancaster  county,  Pennsylvania;  Catharine,  who  is  the  widow 
of  John  Stauffer  and  resides  in  Rowland,  Nebraska;  Peter,  of  Spokane, 
Washington;  Isaac,  living  in  Sterling;  Benjamin,  also  of  Sterling;  Mary, 
the  widow  of  Weidler  Greybill,  who  likewise  resides  in  Roseland,  Nebraska. 
Those  who  have  passed  away  are:  Levi;  Lydia,  the  wife  of  John  Buckwalter, 


HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY  655 

Fannie,  the  wife  of  William  Echternaeh;  Henry;  and  Susan,  who  departed 
this  life  when  two  years  of  age. 

The  personal  history  of  Henry  Bressler  is  the  record  of  a  man  who 
in  all  life's  relations  was  found  trustworthy,  whose  ideals  were  high  and 
who  ever  made  earnest  effort  to  live  up  to  the  standard  which  he  set  before 
him.  He  was  reared  in  the  east,  remaining  upon  a  farm  in  Lancaster  county, 
Pennsylvania,  during  the  period  of  his  boyhood  and  youth,  while  the  public 
schools  of  that  locality  afforded  him  his  education-al  advantages.  He  was 
a  young  man  of  about  twenty-five  years  when  he  first  sought  the  opportunities 
of  the  west,  thinking  to  improve  his  financial  condition  by  a  removal  to  this 
less  thickly  settled  but  more  rapidly  developing  region.  Accordingly  he 
arrived  in  Whiteside  county  in  1851,  accompanied  by  his  wife,  and  pur- 
chased one  hundred  and  sixty  acres  of  land  in  Jordan  township  at  the  usual 
government  price. 

On  the  21st  of  December,  1848,  Mr.  Bressler  had  married  Miss  Margaret 
Stauffer,  who  was  born  in  Pennsylvania,  April  8,  1830,  a  daughter  of  John 
and  Barbara  (Eby)  Stauffer.  Her  parents  were  also  natives  of  Lancaster 
county,  Pennsylvania,  Her  paternal  grandparents  were  Christian  and  Fan- 
nie Stauffer.  The  former  was  born  in  the  Keystone  state,  of  German  descent, 
and  was  a  miller  by  trade.  He  owned  a  large  farm,  which  he  cultivated 
for  many  years  and  at  the  age  of  seventy-seven  he  passed  to  his  final  rest, 
while  his  wife  was  sixty-five  years  of  age  at  the  time  of  her  demise.  Their 
family  numbered  seven  children,  who  reached  years  of  maturity:  John, 
Maria,  Benjamin,  Annie,  Betsey,  Jacob  and  Barbara.  The  maternal  grand- 
father of  Mrs.  Brassier  was  Peter  Eby,  a  native  of  Pennsylvania,  who  followed 
the  occupation  of  farming  and  was  also  a  Mennonite  preacher.  He  wedded 
Margaret  Hess  and  both  lived  to  an  advanced  age,  rearing  a  large  family, 
which  included  Peter,  Christ,  John,  Henry,  Ann  Susan,  Barbara,  Elizabeth, 
Annie  and  Maria.  The  children  of  Mr.  and  Mrs.  John  Stauffer  were  eight  in 
number:  Benjamin,  Fannie,  Peter,  Christ,  John,  Margaret,  Annie  and  Bar- 
bara, and  the  only  one  now  living  is  Mrs.  Bressler. 

Following  the  removal  of  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Bressler  to  Whiteside  county  he 
concentrated  his  time  and  energies  upon  his  business  interests  in  connection 
with  the  development  and  improvement  of  his  farm  and  as  the  years  passed 
by  he  extended  its  boundaries  by  the  purchase  of  an  additional  sixty  acres. 
Upon  that  place  he  resided  for  thirty-two  years,  bringing  it  under  a  high 
state  of  cultivation.  In  1885  they  removed  to  Sterling,  where  Mr.  Bressler 
spent  his  remaining  days  in  honorable  retirement  from  labor. 

They  reared  a  family  of  nine  children,  who  are  a  credit  and  honor 
to  their  name.  Elizabeth,  the  eldest,  is  the  wife  of  Martin  Overholser,  a 
resident  of  California,  and  they  have  four  children :  Ida,  the  wife  of  Walter 
McCaskill ;  May,  the  wife  of  Lewis  Seibert ;  Grace,  the  wife  of  George  Clem- 
ents; and  Lola,  the  wife  of  Walter  Osterhoudt.  Isaac  Bressler,  the  second 
of  the  family,  operating  the  old  home  farm  in  Jordan  township,  married 
Delora  Brewer  and  they  have  three  children,  Fred,  George  and  Carrie,  the 
last  named  the  wife  of  Frank  Weatherwax.  John  Bressler,  a  farmer  residing 
west  of  Sterling,  married  Ora  Brewer  and  they  have  one  son,  Harry.  Henry 


656  HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY 

Bressler  is  living  at  home  with  his  mother.  Marcus,  who  follows  farming 
in  the  state  of  Washington,  married  Leah  Rutt  and  they  have  three  children: 
Lura,  the  wife  of  Roy  Kellogg;  Floyd;  and  Margaret.  Ida  became  the  wife 
of  Stephen  Stiles  and  died  leaving  two  children,  Walter  and  Robert.  Frank, 
a  practicing  physician  of  Chicago,  married  Maude  Sheppard  and  they  have 
a  daughter,  Helen.  Adelia  is  the  wife  of  Lorenzo  Osterhoudt,  a  farmer 
residing  east  of  Sterling,  and  they  have  two  sons,  Walter  and  Henry.  Irving, 
the  youngest  of  the  family,  died  in  infancy. 

The  father  of  this  family  died  on  Christmas  day  of  1905  and  thus  passed 
away  one  of  the  prominent  and  honored  pioneer  .settlers.  He  held  various 
township  offices,  the  duties  of  which  he  discharged  with  promptness,  capa- 
bility and  fidelity.  He  did  not  seek  to  figure  prominently  in  public  life, 
however,  as  he  found  in  his  active  business  career  that  his  farming  interests 
claimed  the  greater  part  of  his  time  and  attention.  He  worked  diligently 
year  by  year  to  attain  success  and  eventually  became  possessed  of  a  valu- 
able property  that  enabled  him  in  his  later  years  to  live  retired  and  to  leave 
his  family  in  comfortable  financial  circumstances.  He  was  devoted  to  the 
welfare  and  happiness  of  her  who  traveled  life's  journey  by  his  side  for 
many  years  as  a  devoted  and  loving  wife.  His  many  good  traits  of  char- 
acter gained  him  the  respect  of  his  fellowmen  and  his  death  was  the  occasion 
of  wide-spread  regret  to  all  who  knew  him. 


AMOS  W.  HARDY. 

Amos  W.  Hardy  has  been  a  life-long  resident  of  Mount  Pleasant  town- 
ship, Whiteside  county.  His  natal  day  was  June  27,  1854,  and  from  early 
boyhood  to  the  present  time  he  has  been  identified  with  agricultural  interests 
here.  His  father,  William  Hardy,  who  carries  on  general  farming  on  section 
13,  Ustick  township,  has  made  his  home  in  the  county  since  1853  and  was  a 
resident  of  Mount  Pleasant  township  until  1877,  when  he  removed  to  Morri- 
son. In  1879  he  became  a  landholder  of  Ustick  township  by  his  purchase  of 
one  hundred  and  sixty-two  acres,  which  he  still  owns.  He  has  since  added 
about  sixty  acres  by  a  later  purchase  and  almost  the  entire  tract  is  now  under 
a  high  state  of  cultivation,  comprising  one  of  the  rich  farming  properties  of 
Whiteside  county.  Mr.  Hardy  was  a  young  man  of  twenty-one  years  when 
he  arrived  here,  his  birth  having  occurred  in  Lincolnshire,  England,  January 
27,  1832.  His  parents  were  Isaac  and  Sarah  Hardy,  both  of  whom  died  in 
England.  William  Hardy  is  their  fifth  child  and  has  seven  brothers  and 
sisters.  He  was  reared  to  farm  life  and  remained  a  resident  of  his  native  land 
until  1852,  when  he  came  to  the  United  States,  spending  a  year  in  New  York 
city,  whence  he  removed  to  Whiteside  county  in  1853.  He  has  been  a  stal- 
wart republican  since  becoming  a  naturalized  American  citizen  and  has  served 
as  school  trustee  but  has  never  been  active  as  an  office  seeker.  In  early  man- 
hood he  married  Keziah  Richardson,  at  Unionville.  Illinois,  and  to  them  were 
born  seven  children:  Amos  W.,  Richardson  I.,  Wingfield  J.,  Horace  G., 


HISTORY    OF   WHITESIDE    COUNTY  657 

Olive,  Alice  J.,  and  Ruby  K.  Mrs.  William  Hardy  had  been  previously  mar- 
ried, her  first  husband  being  Thomas  Hardy,  who  died  in  Mount  Pleasant 
township.  Her  death  occurred  in  August,  1869,  and  William  Hardy  after- 
ward wedded  Alicia  Richardson,  the  widow  of  William  Kennen,  who  passed 
away  in  Mount  Pleasant  township.  The  death  of  Mrs.  Alicia  Hardy  occurred 
April  2,  1885,  in  Ustick  township. 

Amos  W.  Hardy,  whose  name  introduces  this  record,  was  reared  to  the 
occupation  of  farming  and  in  his  youth  acquired  a  good  English  education  in 
the  public  schools.  He  was  married  on  the  27th  of  November,  1878,  to  Miss 
Harriet  Bowen,  a  daughter  of  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Sylvester  Bowen.  Her  father  was 
born  September  8,  1805,  and  came  to  Illinois  in  1853.  Here  his  death  occurred 
November  16,  1876.  His  wife,  who  was  born  May  1,  1817,  died  February  8, 
1889.  They  were  the  parents  of  five  children:  Randall,  who  is  married  and 
lives  in  Lyndon;  William,  of  Denison,  Iowa,  who  is  married  and  has  five  chil- 
dren; Mrs.  Myra  Loucks,  of  Traverse  City,  Michigan,  who  has  one  daughter; 
Mrs.  Helen  Tuller,  who  died  leaving  a  daughter,  who  is  now  a  resident  of 
Lyndon;  and  Mrs.  Hardy.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Bowen  were  earnest,  consistent  Chris- 
tian people  and  held  membership  in  the  Methodist  P^piscopal  church. 

The  marriage  of  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Hardy  has  been  blessed  with  four  chil- 
dren: Ralph  W.,  born  September  1,  1879,  resides  at  home  and  follows  the 
machinist's  trade.  He  is  a  member  of  the  Modern  Woodmen.  R.  Alice,  born 
October  24,  1881,  is  now  teaching  in  Mount  Pleasant  township  and  she  belongs 
to  the  Royal  Neighbors.  Sylvia  K.,  born  November  20,  1883,  is  at  home. 
Ross  L.,  born  December  20,  1886,  is  an  engineer.  All  the  children  yet  remain 
under  the  parental  roof. 

The  family  home  is  a  fine  farm  of  one  hundred  and  ten  acres  situated  in 
Mount  Pleasant  township.  It  belongs  to  his  father,  but  A.  W.  Hardy  has  en- 
tire management  of  the  place  and  in  the  cultivation  of  the  fields  is  meeting 
with  good  success.  He  belongs  to  the  Modern  Woodmen  Camp  and  his  wife 
is  a  member  of  the  Royal  Neighbors  and  also  of  the  Methodist  Episcopal 
church.  Mr.  Hardy  gives  his  political  allegiance  to  the  republican  'party  and 
has  served  in  several  of  the  township  offices,  wherein  he  has  discharged  his 
"  duties  with  a  promptness  and  fidelity  that  have  won  him  high  encomiums, 
lems  that  continually  confront  the  physician. 


J.  M.  WINKEY. 

J.  M.  Winkey  is  the  owner  of  an  excellent  farm  of  one  hundred  and  fif- 
teen acres  situated  on  section  7,  Genesee  township,  and  its  neat  and  thrifty 
appearance  indicates  his  progressive  spirit  and  unwearied  industry.  It  was  in 
this  township  that  his  birth  occurred  July  13,  1871.  His  parents,  William  and 
Pauline  (Larke)  Winkey,  were  both  natives  of  Germany  and  in  1867  came  to 
America,  at  which  time  they  established  their  home  in  Carroll  county,  Illi- 
nois. After  a  year  there  passed,  however,  they  removed  to  Genesee  township, 
Whiteside  county,  where  Mr.  Winkey  purchased  a  tract  of  land  and  carried 
on  general  farming.  He  was  thus  engaged  until  his  life's  labors  were  ended 


658  HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY 

in  death  in  1874.  His  widow  still  survives  and  is  yet  residing  upon  the  old 
homestead  in  this  county.  Their  family  numbered  seven  children:  William, 
of  this  county;  Gustave,  who  resides  in  Carroll  county,  Illinois;  Emma,  the 
wife  of  Christ  Schultz,  of  Whiteside  county;  J.  M.,  of  this  review;  Lena,  the 
wife  of  Herman  Heide,  of  Carroll  county,  Illinois;  and  two  who  have  passed 
away. 

No  event  of  special  importance  occurred  to  vary  the  routine  of  farm  life 
for  J.  M.  Winkey  in  his  boyhood  and  youth.  He  remained  at  home  until 
twenty-seven  years  of  age.  He  was  only  eighteen  months  old  at  the  time  of  his 
father's  death  but  he  continued  with  his  mother  and  as  his  age  and  strength 
increased  aided  more  and  more  largely  in  the  work  of  the  fields.  He  was  a 
student  in  the  public  schools  but  through  the  months  of  summer  worked  on 
the  farm  until  he  reached  the  age  of  twenty^seven,  when  he  rented  land  and 
thus  started  out  in  life  on  his  own  account.  For  six  years  he  thus  engaged  in 
farming,  after  which  he  purchased  one  hundred  and  fifteen  acres  of  land  on 
section  7,  Genesee  township,  where  he  now  resides.  Here  he  carries  on  general 
agricultural  pursuits  and  has  a  well  developed  property,  his  careful  conduct  of 
its  interests  bringing  to  him  a  goodly  return  in  large  crops,  for  which  he  finds 
a  ready  sale  on  the  market. 

In  1897  Mr.  Winkey  was  married  to  Mis?  Ottilie  Appold,  who  was  born 
in  Germany,  July  9,  1878.  Her  father  died  in  that  country  and  the  daugh- 
ter afterward  came  to  America  with  her  mother  in  1891.  She  was  an  only 
child  but  by  her  marriage  has  become  the  mother  of  four  children :  Walter 
H.,  Irma  0.,  Marie  T.  and  Bertha  E.  The  parents  are  both  members  of  the 
German  Lutheran  church  and  as  such  are  highly  esteemed  because  of  their 
fidelity  to  their  principles.  Mr.  Winkey  votes  with  the  republican  party  and 
is  loyal  to  its  interests  but  has  no  desire  for  public  office,  as  he  prefers  to  give 
undivided  attention  to  his  business. 


EDWARD  A.  SMITH. 

Edward  A.  Smith,  well  known  in  the  business  circles  of  Morrison  as 
president  of  the  First  National  Bank,  was  born  in  Fulton,  Illinois,  June  27, 
1865,  and  was  a  student  in  the  schools  of  this  city  in  his  boyhood  days  and 
afterward  attended  Cornell  College  at  Mount  Vernon,  Iowa,  for  a  short  time. 
He  put  aside  his  text-books  in  order  to  assist  his  father  in  the  bank,  a  brother 
having  died  in  1887,  so  that  there  was  a  vacancy  left  in  the  clerical  force  of 
the  institution.  At  intervals  from  1884  he  had  assisted  in  the  bank,  so  that 
the  business  was  not  entirely  unfamiliar  to  him.  The  institution  is  known 
under  the  firm  style  of  the  Leander  Smith  &  Son  Bank,  Edward  A.  Smith 
having  been  admitted  to  a  partnership  ori  the  retirement  of  Duncan  Mackay. 
Since  the  death  of  his  father  he  has  been  at  the  head  of  the  bank  and  in  its 
conduct  is  associated  with  a  younger  brother,  Harry  W.,  who  came  into  the 
bank  as  an  equal  partner,  but  the  name  of  Leander  Smith  &  Son  has  been 
retained.  They  do  a  general  banking  and  also  a  mortgage  loan  business  on 


LIBRARY 

OF  THE 

DIVERSITY  OF  ILLINOIS 


HISTORY    OP    WHITESIDE    COUNTY  661 

real  estate.  Edward  A.  Smith  is  also  president  of  the  First  National  Bank 
at  Morrison  and  of  the  Illinois  Refrigerator  Company.  He  is  likewise  inter- 
ested in  lands  in  Union  Grove,  Mount  Pleasant,  Newton  and  Ustick  town- 
ships, in  Wisconsin,  Minnesota,  the  Dakotas  and  Iowa,  and  likewise  in  real 
estate  in  Morrison. 

In  1889  Mr.  Smith  was  married  to  Miss  Ellen  M.  Sprague,  who  was 
born  in  Monmouth,  Illinois,  in  1867,  a  daughter  of  Henry  T.  and  Caroline 
Sprague.  Her  father  following  farming  in  Warren  county,  Illinois,  for  a 
short  time  and  then  returned  to  New  York.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Smith  have  five 
children :  Eleanor  A.,  who  is  attending  the  Emma  Willard  School  for  Girls 
at  Troy,  New  York ;  Marion  L.  and  Frank  L.,  who  are  students  in  the  high 
school  at  Morrison ;  Dorothy  C.,  also  in  school ;  and  Edward  A.,  who  com- 
pletes the  family. 

Mr.  Smith  is  a  Mason  and  also  belongs  to  the  State  Bankers'  Association. 
In  politics  he  is  an  earnest  republican  and  is  interested  in  community  affairs. 
For  more  than  a  half  century  the  Smith  family,  of  which  Edward  A.  Smith 
is  a  representative,  has  figured  in  connection  with  the  history,  the  develop- 
ment and  the  upbuilding  of  this  part  of  the  state  and  Mr.  Smith  is  a  worthy 
scion  of  his  race,  carefully  conducting  the  business  interests  which  were  estab- 
lished by  his  father  and  extending  the  scope  of  his  activity  through  personal 
investment  and  enterprise. 


EDWIN    MALTVA    COE. 

Among  the  representatives  of  farming  interests  in  Hopkins  township 
who  by  consecutive  and  well  directed  efforts  have  gained  prominence  and  suc- 
cess, is  numbered  Edwin  Maltva  Coe,  who  owns  and  cultivates  an  excellent 
farm  on  section  33.  Hopkins  township.  He  was  born  January  5,  1858,  in 
Jordan  township,  White.-ide  county,  Illinois,  a  son  of  Mortimer  Strong  and 
Rachel  (Penrose)  Coe,  who  were  natives  of  New  York  and  Ohio  respectively. 
The  father  was  one  of  Whiteside  county's  prominent  old  settlers.  His  parents 
were  Simeon  M.  and  Mary  (Miles)  Coe,  pioneers  of  Whiteside  county. 
Simeon  Maltva  Coe,  the  grandfather  of  our  subject,  was  born  March  12, 
1810,  in  Paris  township,  Orieida  county,  New  York,  and  was  a  son  of  Simeon 
Maltva  Coe,  Sr.,  whose  birth  occurred  in  Litchfield,  Connecticut,  October 
29,  1784.  His  immediate  ancestors  were  descended  from  one  of  several 
brothers  who  came  from  England.  Throughout  succeeding  generations  the 
representatives  of  the  family  followed  the  occupation  of  farming  and  all 
have  sustained  the  prestige  of  an  honored  name.  Simeon  Coe  and  Joshua 
Miles,  the  paternal  and  maternal  grandfathers  of  Mortimer  S.  Coe,  were  both 
soldiers  of  the  Revolutionary  war  and  the  latter  became  a  captain  in  the 
army  under  General  Putnam.  As  the  family  has  grown  and  scattered,  differ- 
ent branches  have  located  in  New  England,  New  York  and  Ohio. 

Simeon  M.  Coe,  the  grandfather  of  Edwin  M.  Coe,  was  descended  from 
the  New  England  branch  of  the  family  and  was  married,  September  1,  1807, 


662  HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY 

to  Mary  Miles,  a  native  of  Connecticut.  ,  After  their,  marriage  they  removed 
to  Oneida  county,  New  York,  locating  near  the  site  of  the  city  of  Utica, 
although  the  town  had  not  then  been  founded.  They  were  pioneers  of  that 
locality  and  Mr.  Coe  cleared  and  otherwise  improved  two  farms  in  that  dis- 
trict. The  maternal  grandfather  of  Edwin  M.  Coe  was  Edwin  Penrose,  who 
was  of  English  descent  and  of  Canadian  parentage.  He  was  born  in  Pennsyl- 
vania but  in  early  life  became  a  resident  of  Ohio  and  was  married  in  that 
state. 

The  father,  Mortimer  S.  Coe.  was  born  in  Rush,  Monroe  county,  New 
York,  September  21,  1832,  and  was  but  a  child  when  the  removal  of  the 
family  to  Illinois  made  him  a  resident  of  Whiteside  county.  He  was  but 
a  lad  when  his  father  died  and  he  remained  the  companion  and  helper  of 
his  mother  and  sister  until  he  had  almost  attained  his  majority.  He  started 
out  in  life  on  his  own  account  as  a  day  laborer  and  from  a  humble  position 
in  the  business  world  steadily  worked  his  way  upward  to  affluence  and  promi- 
nence. He  was  married  March  28,  1855,  to  Miss  Rachel  Penrose,  a  daughter 
of  Edwin  and  Mary  (Spencer)  Penrose.  They  immediately  afterward  located 
upon  a  farm  in  Jordan  township  and  he  brought  the  fields  under  a  high 
state  of  cultivation,  residing  there  until  about  1869.  He  then  sold  that 
property  and  subsequently  purchased  a  farm  of  two  hundred  and  forty 
acres  in  Hume  township,  five  miles  west  of  Rock  Falls.  He  made  this  one 
of  the  best  improved  and  most  valuable  farms  in  the  township,  erecting  a 
beautiful  home  in  the  midst  of  attractive  surroundings.  The  farm  presented 
a  well  kept  appearance,  indicating  the  careful  supervision  of  the  owner, 
neatness  and  thrift  characterizing  every  department  of  the  farm.  He  raised 
stock  of  the  highest  grades  and  annually  gathered  rich  harvests.  Upon  the 
farm  he  remained  until  1893,  when  he  retired  from  active  work  and  re- 
moved to  Rock  Falls,  spending  his  remaining  days  in  the  enjoyment  of  well 
earned  rest.  Unto  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Coe  were  born  two  children:  Edwin  M., 
of  this  review;  and  Albert  L.,  who  is  living  in  Rock  Falls.  The  father  had 
eight  brothers  and  three  sisters,  namely:  Mrs.  Lucy  M.  Stull,  Simeon  M., 
George  A.,  Frederick  M.,  Henry  A.,  Albert  S.,  Jonathan  F.,  Decius  O.,  Ade- 
line E.,  Marcus  L.,  and  Mrs.  Helen  A.  Stevens.  The  last  named  is  the  only 
surviving  members  of  this  large  family  of  children  and  now  lives  in  Sterling. 
Mortimer  S.  Coe  was  a  good  man  and  true.  He  was  quiet  and  unassuming 
in  manner  but  the  sterling  traits  of  his  character  were  widely  recognized  and 
he  was  beloved  by  all  who  knew  him.  In  his  family  he  was  a  kind  and 
indulgent  father  and  a  loving  and  helpful  husband  and  in  the  community 
was  known  as  a  loyal  neighbor  and  friend.  He  belonged  to  the  Rock  Falls 
Methodist  church  and  was  a  consistent  Christian  gentleman  and  a  man  of 
great  moral  strength.  He  stood  as  an  uncompromising  republican,  believing 
firmly  in  the  principles  of  the  party  and  proving  especially  stanch  in  his 
support  of  the  party  during  the  early  days  when  it  stood  for  the  suppression 
of  slavery  in  the  north. 

Edwin  M.  Coe  was  educated  in  the  common  schools  and  assisted  in  the 
work  of  the  home  farm  until  about  twenty-five  years  of  age.  He  thus  early 
gained  intimate  knowledge  of  the  best  methods  of  tilling  the  soil  and  caring 


HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY  663 

for  the  crops.  He  was  married  December  22,  1881,  to  Miss  Adelia  Mangan, 
a  daughter  of  Richard  L.  and  Naomi  J.  (Thoman)  Mangan.  Her  father 
was  born  July  13,  1821,  in  Philadelphia,  Pennsylvania,  in  which  city  his 
early  youth  was  passed.  He  was  married  September  16,  1843,  to  Miss  Naomi 
J.  Thoman  and  to  provide  for  his  family  followed  the  stone-mason's  trade. 
About  1854,  however,  he  left  the  east  and  removed  to  Whiteside  county, 
Illinois,  where  he  engaged  in  farming  to  some  extent  and  at  the  same  time 
worked  at  his  trade.  For  thirty-two  years  he  made  his  home  in  Sterling, 
where  his  death  occurred  on  May  16,  1887.  In  August,  1862,  he  responded 
to  the  country's  call  for  troops,  enlisting  as  a  member  of  Company  D,  Seventy- 
fifth  Regiment  of  Illinois  Volunteers.  He  "was  with  that  command  in  all  of 
its  engagements  until  he  was  wounded  on  the  29th  of  July,  1862.  He  was 
made  corporal  on  the  8th  of  April,  1863;  first  sergeant  on  the  17th  of  April, 
1863;  and  was  afterward  promoted  to  the  second  lieutenancy,  which  rank  he 
held  at  the  time  of  his  discharge.  He  was  wounded  before  Kenesaw  Moun- 
tain, Georgia,  in  June,  1864,  by  a  musket  ball,  which  struck  the  upper  part  of 
his  foot.  He  was  carried  to  the  rear  and  his  foot  amputated  but  gangrene 
set  in  and  a  second  amputation  was  necessary.  As  this  did  not  check  the 
gangrene  a  third  amputation  followed,  until  the  leg  was  off  almost  to  the 
knee.  He  arrived  home  in  September,  1864,  and  although  he  afterward 
went  to  Philadelphia  and  got  a  regular  patent  government  leg  and  foot, 
he  always  suffered  from  his  injury,  many  times  being  in  severe  pain.  He 
was  a  good  citizen  arid  brave  soldier  and  proved  his  loyalty  to  the  country 
in  days  of  peace  as  he  did  in  days  of  war.  He  rendered  capable  service  to 
his  fellow  townsmen  as  a  member  of  the  city  council,  also  as  justice  of  the 
peace,  and  again  as  city  treasurer.  For  many  years  he  served  as  justice  of 
the  peace  and  his  decisions  were  strictly  fair  and  impartial.  Mrs.  Coe  is 
one  of  a  family  of  eleven  children,  namely:  Mrs.  Mary  L.  King,  a  widow, 
residing  in  Chicago;  Samuel  Thoman,  who  is  living  in  Sterling;  William  F., 
also  a  resident  of  Sterling;  Mrs.  Emily  Hoyt,  a  resident  of  Pennsylvania; 
George  K.,  deceased:  Mrs.  Caroline  Stevens;  Richard  L.,  and  Cyrus,  all  resi- 
dents of  Sterling;  Mrs.  Coe;  Irwin  J.,  living  in  Harris,  Iowa;  and  Mrs.  Clara 
Shaw,  of  Chicago. 

Unto  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Coe  have  been  born  three  children :  Albert  Irwin, 
who  is  attending  college  in  Mount  Vernon,  Iowa:  Lauren  Mortimer,  who  is 
also  attending  college  in  Mount  Vernon,  Iowa;  and  Carroll  Decius,  who  is 
now  completing  the  high  school  course. 

The  home  farm  of  the  family  comprises  one  hundred  and  ninety  acres 
of  rich  and  productive  land.  It  is  carefully  and  systematically  cultivated  in 
the  production  of  corn,  wheat  and  other  cereals.  It  is  pleasantly  located, 
about  seven  and  a  half  miles  from  Sterling  ancj  about  the  same  distance 
from  Morrison  and  in  his  farm  work  Mr.  Coe  displays  keen  judgment  and 
sagacity.  In  all  of  his  business  dealings  he  is  thoroughly  reliable  as  well 
as  enterprising  and  his  labors  have  thus  resulted  in  winning  creditable  suc- 
cess. In  community  affairs  he  is  progressive  and  takes  an  interest  in  all 
that  pertains  to  the  welfare  and  advancement  of  his  native  county.  He 
has  been  assessor  of  Hopkins  township  for  three  years,  school  trustee  for 


664  HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY 

about  fifteen  years  and  also  town  cleric.  He  and  his  family  are  members  of 
the  Fourth  Street  Methodist  Episcopal  church,  of  Sterling,  and  he  has  served 
as  superintendent  of  the  Ben  Sunday  school  for  ten  or  more  years.  He 
belongs  to  Sterling  Lodge,  M.  W.  A.,  and  is  loyal  to  the  teachings  of  the 
order  and  of  the  church,  his  life  being  actuated  by  high  and  honorable  prin- 
ciples, whereby  he  commands  the  warm  regard  of  all  with  whom  he  is 
associated. 


HENRY   BRUBAKER, 

Henry  Brubaker.  an  enterprising  and  successful  agriculturist  and  stock- 
raiser  of  Garden  Plain  township,  was  born  in  Lancaster  county,  Pennsyl- 
vania, September  28,  1834,  his  parents  being  Henry  and  Susan  (Brubaker) 
Brubaker,  who  were  likewise  natives  of  the  Keystone  state.  The  paternal 
great-grandfather  of  our  subject  emigrated  from  Germany  to  the  United 
States  and  served  with  the  American  army  in  the  war  for  independence.  The 
grandfather,  Abram  Brubaker,  reared  a  family  of  two  sons  and  two  daughters, 
of  whom  Henry  Brubaker,  the  father  of  our  subject,  took  up  his  abode  in 
Lancaster  county  and  later  went  to  Franklin  county,  Pennsylvania.  The 
latter  passed  away  in  the  year  1863  and  his  wife  was  seventy-five  years  of 
age  at  the  time  of  her  demise.  Their  family  numbered  eleven  children,  as 
follows:  Samuel,  deceased,  whose  family  resides  in  Franklin  county,  Penn- 
sylvania; Daniel,  who  has  also  departed  this  life;  Fannie,  the  widow  of  David 
Keller,  who  likewise  makes  her  home  in  Franklin  county;  Carrie  and  Eliza- 
beth, twins,  both  now  deceased,  the  former  having  been  the  wife,  of  John 
Brakefield  and  the  latter  the  wife  of  John  Sell,  of  Franklin  county,  Penn- 
sylvania: Abram,  who  resides  in  Whiteside  county,  Illinois;  Henry,  of  this 
review;  Annie,  the  deceased  wife  of  Jacoby  Meyer,  of  Pennsylvania;  Susan, 
the  widow  of  Daniel  Brewer;  John,  who  makes  his  home  in  Garden  Plain 
township;  and  Ezra,  of  Franklin  county,  Pennsylvania. 

Henry  Brubaker  was  educated  in  the  district  schools  of  Franklin  county, 
Pennsylvania,  and  there  grew  to  manhood.  In  1865  he  came  westward  to 
Whiteside  county,  Illinois,  settling  in  Garden  Plain  township  on  the  place 
where  he  now  resides.  He  first  purchased  a  tract  of  eighty  acres  which  was 
slightly  improved,  paying  thirty  dollars  per  acre  for  the  land,  and  subse- 
quently bought  forty  acres  adjoining,  at  thirty-five  dollars  per  acre.  Later 
he  added  to  his  holdings  a  tract  of  twenty-five  acres,  mostly  timber  land, 
for  which  he  paid  a  thousand  dollars,  and  has  also  purchased  another  eighty- 
acre  tract  at  sixty-six  dollars  per  acre.  Mr.  Brubaker  has  one  of  the  best 
improved  farms  and  most  desirable  locations  in  Garden  Plain  township,  and 
his  success  is  all  the  more  commendable  by  reason  of  the  fact  that  it  has 
been  gained  entirely  through  his  own  well  directed  energy  and  straightfor- 
ward business  dealing.  He  is  widely  recognized  as  one  of  the  most  successful 
agriculturists  and  stock-raisers  of  the  community  and  as  a  progressive  and 
enterprising  citizen. 


HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY  665 

In  1863  Mr.  Brubaker  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Margaret  E. 
Rinaker.  a  daughter  of  Samuel  and  Catherine  (Hevel)  Rinaker,  natives  of 
Pennsylvania  and  Germany  respectively,  the  latter  being  eighteen  years 
of  age  on  her  arrival  in  this  country.  Her  father,  who  came  to  the  United 
States  prior  to  the  Revolutionary  Avar,  took  part  in  that  struggle  for  liberty 
and  was  killed  in  battle.  He  had  intended  to  bring  his  family  to  America 
as  soon  as  he  was  able  to  do  so.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Samuel  Rinaker  reared  a  fam- 
ily of  eight  children :  John,  who  now  resides  in  Moundridge,  Kansas,  served 
as  a  soldier  of  the  Civil  war  for  nine  months.  Mary  is  the  deceased  wife  of 
John  Miller.  Catherine  is  the  wife  of  Hiram  Kirschner,  of  Oklahoma.  Eliz- 
abeth is  the  next  member  of  the  family.  Sarah  is  the  deceased  wife  of 
William  Spore.  Samuel  enlisted  for  service  in  the  Civil  war  three  different 
times,  his  first  term  being  for  three  months,  his  second  for  nine  months  and 
his  third  term  of  enlistment  for  the  remainder  of  the  war.  He  served  for 
almost  five  years  and  was  never  wounded,  though  he  took  part  in  a  number 
of  important  and  hotly  contested  engagements,  including  the  battles  of  Bull 
Run  and  Gettysburg.  He  now  makes  his  home  in  Oklahoma.  Daniel  and 
Annie  Rinaker  are  both  now  deceased.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Brubaker  are  the 
parents  of  three  daughters:  Laura,  the  wife  of  Ervin  Hoff,  of  Garden  Plain 
township ;  Emma,  the  wife  of  George  Garwick,  likewise  of  Garden  Plain 
township;  and  Cora,  who  died  at  the  age  of  thirteen  years. 

Both  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Brubaker  are  devoted  and  faithful  members  of  the 
Church  of  Christ,  and  during  the  long  period  of  their  residence  here  have 
gained  the  warm  esteem  and  friendship  of  many  with  whom  they  have  come 
in  contact,  being  well  known  as  people  of  genuine  personal  worth  and  up- 
right, honorable  lives.  Coming  to  this  part  of  the  state  when  it  was  still  a 
pioneer  region,  they  have  watched  with  interest  and  likewise  aided  the  slow, 
persistent  work  of  development  that  has  transformed  the  county  into  a  rich 
agricultural  district  teeming  with  all  the  comforts  and  conveniences  of  a 
modern  civilization. 


JUDSON  TAYLOR  WILLIAMS. 

Judson  Taylor  Williams,  who  resides  upon  Woodlawn  farm  near  Ster- 
ling, is  the  owner  of  some  of  the  finest  farms  of  this  section  of  the  state,  his 
landed  possessions  aggregating  sixteen  hundred  acres.  He  is  also  extensively 
engaged  in  breeding  livestock  and  stands  as  one  of  the  foremost  representa- 
tives of  agricultural  interests  of  central  Illinois.  His  success  as  a  breeder  of 
live-stock  has  been  so  great,  being  the  result  of  keen  sagacity,  business  dis- 
crimination and  experiment,  as  to  render  his  opinions  upon  this  subject  large- 
ly conclusive. 

He  was  born  May  22,  1875,  and  in  both  the  paternal  and  maternal  lines 
is  a  representative  of  families  prominent  in  the  upbuilding  and  progress  of 
this  state.  His  paternal  grandfather,  David  W.  Williams,  was  a  native  of  the 
Empire  state  and  followed  the  occupation  of  farming  at  Argyle,  New  York, 


666  HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY 

where  he  died  at  the  age  of  eighty-one  years.  His  wife,  Mrs.  Margaret  (Tacey) 
Williams,  was  of  Scotch-Irish  descent  and  was  upwards  of  sixty-four  years  of 
age  at  the  time  of  her  death.  They  had  two  sons  and  a  daughter,  and  by  a 
former  marriage  David  Williams  had  two  children,  one  of  whom,  Robert,  id 
now  living  in  Waterloo,  Iowa,  at  about  the  age  of  eighty-seven  years. 

Taylor  Williams,  father  of  our  subject,  was  born  in  the  state  of  New  York 
and  after  arriving  at  years  of  maturity  wedded  Mary  N.  Jenne.  Her  father 
was  Daniel  C.  Jenne,  to  whom  Illinois  and  the  upper  Mississippi  valley  region 
is  greatly  indebted  for  its  progress.  He  was  associated  in  large  and  beneficial 
measure  with  the  improvement  of  the  waterways  and  the  establishment  of 
railroad  transportation  in  this  part  of  the  country  and  in  all  of  his  work  the 
public  was  a  large,  if  indirect,  beneficiary.  His  birth  occurred  at  Shaftsbury, 
Vermont,  in  1814.  He  became  a  civil  engineer,  following  that  profession 
through  much  of  his  life,  although  at  different  times  he  was  also  connected 
with  the  coal  business  and  with  railroad  interests.  Coming  to  the  west,  he 
purchased  a  large  tract  of  land  at  Prophetetown,  Illinois.  He  also  lived  in 
Chicago  for  a  time  but  died  in  Sterling,  when  more  than  seventy-one  years  of 
age.  At  the  time  of  his  death,  in  1886,  he  was  president  of  the  Brazil  Block 
Coal  Company.  For  many  years  he  had  charge  of  the  eastern  division  of  the 
Erie  canal,  the  Black  River  canal  and  the  Champlain  canal  and  was  known 
as  a  division  engineer.  At  the  same  time  he  was  chief  engineer  of  the  Utica 
&  Black  River  Railroad.  In  1867  there  came  to  him  very  unexpectedly  an 
appointment  whereby  he  was  placed  in  charge  of  the  improvement  of  the 
Mississippi  river  at  Keokuk,  Iowa.  While  at  that  place  he  was  appointed  by 
the  state  of  Illinois  to  take  charge  of  the  Illinois  river  improvement  and  to  put 
in  locks  and  dams.  After  the  completion  of  this  work  he  began  operating  in 
the  coal  fields  and  continued  in  that  business  up  to  the  time  of  his  demise, 
his  previous  experience  in  civil  engineering  proving  of  much  value  to  him  in 
this  later  line  of  work.  In  1856.  at  the  solicitation  of  Governor  Horatio  Sey- 
mour, he  went  to  Appleton,  Wisconsin,  to  take  charge  of  the  improvement  of 
the  Fox  and  Wisconsin  rivers.  In  1862  he  went  to  Kenosha,  where  he  built 
the  Kenosha  &  Rockford  Railroad.  On  the  completion  of  that  line  he  returned 
to  Albany,  New  York,  where  he  resumed  his  old  position  of  division  engineer 
of  the  New  York  canals.  His  life  work  was  therefore  of  a  most  important 
nature,  proving  an  element  in  the  development  and  progress  of  various  locali- 
ties. Throughout  his  entire  life  he  was  a  consistent  member  of  the  Baptist 
church  and  at  the  time  of  his  death  was  a  trustee  of  the  Divinity  School  at 
Morgan  Park,  Illinois,  and  also  chairman  of  the  building  committee  which 
erected  the  library  there.  A  gentleman  of  plain  and  unpretentious  manner, 
he  possessed  nevertheless  great  strength  of  character  and  commanded  the 
respect  and  confidence  of  all  who  knew  him. 

Daniel  C.  Jenne  married  Nancy  D.  Butler,  a  daughter  of  Ezekiel  and 
Eunice  (Shaw)  Butler,  the  former  a  son  of  Luther  and  Hannah  (Wilson) 
Butler,  while  Eunice  Shaw  was  a  daughter  of  Eunice  and  Dorcas  (Gee) 
Shaw.  The  ancestry  of  the  Jenne  family  could  also  be  traced  back  to  a  much 
more  remote  period,  Daniel  Jenne  being  descended  from  John  Jenne,  who  in 
1623  came  on  the  third  ship  from  England.  The  death  of  Mrs.  Daniel 


HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY  667 

Jenne  occurred  in  Chicago,  when  she  was  seventy-four  years  of  age.  Their 
family  numbered  four  children,  including  Mrs.  Mary  J.  Williams,  who  was 
a  native  of  the  Empire  state  and  became  the  wife  of  Taylor  Williams,  their 
only  child  being  Judson  Taylor  Williams  of  this  review. 

The  father,  Taylor  Williams,  was  a  grain  dealer  and  live-stock  buyer, 
who  prior  to  the  Civil  war  came  to  the  west,  settling  at  Ottawa,  Illinois,  about 
1856  or  1857.  Thence  he  removed  to  Sterling  and  began  farming,  while  sub- 
sequently he  operated  a  coal  mine  at  Rapid  City,  at  Cleveland,  ait  Happy  Hol- 
low and  also  at  St.  David,  JSiorris,  Clark  City  and  Gardner,  Illinois.  He  was 
thus  closely  associated  with  the  development  of  the  natural  resources  of  the 
state  in  taking  from  the  earth  its  rich  coal  deposits  and  as  he  met  prosperity 
in  his  undertakings  he  made  judicious  investments  in  property  and  became 
the  owner  of  valuable  fanning  lands.  He  dealt  extensively  in  grain  and  in 
live-stock,  and  although  his  business  interests  called  him  to  various  localities 
he  still  retained  his  residence  in  Sterling  and  here  died  in  1897,  at  the  age 
of  sixty-six  years.  Mrs.  Mary  J.  Williams  still  survives  him.  The  father 
had  been  previously  married,  his  first  union  being  with  Susan  Mickle  and  to 
them  was  born  a  daughter,  Elizabeth,  now  the  wife  of  C.  E.  Goltman,  of 
Sterling.  At  one  time  Taylor  and  Mary  J.  Williams  were  members  of  the 
Baptist  church  but  in  later  life  Mr.  Williams  became  identified  with  the  Pres- 
byterian church.  He  was  a  man  of  exemplary  traits  of  character,  honorable 
and  reliable  in  every  relation  of  life,  and  Sterling  recognized  him  as  one  of 
its  foremost  citizens.  His  path  was  never  strewn  with  the  wreck  of  other 
men's  fortunes,  his  success  resulting  from  a  fair  exchange  in  purchase  and 
sale,  from  judicious  investment  and  the  legitimate  profit  which  arises  from  an 
honorable  conduct  of  business. 

Judson  T.  Williams,  always  a  resident  of  Sterling,  attended  the  public 
schools  of  the  city  in  his  early  youth  and  afterward  continued  his  education 
in  Lake  Forest  Academy,  at  Lake  Forest,  Illinois.  When  he  had  completed 
his  education  he  spent  two  or  three  years  in  buying  live-stock  and  was  after- 
ward engaged  in  the  coal  business  for  six  years  at  St.  Louis.  He  then  returned 
to  his  old  home  in  Sterling  and  in  1904  he  purchased  what  was  known  as  the 
AVhipple  farm,  adjoining  the  corporation  limits  of  the  city  on  the  west.  He 
breeds,  buys  and  sells  live-stock,  handling  trotting  horses,  Percherons,  saddle 
horses  and  Shetland  ponies.  He  also  breeds  and  raises  Holstein,  Hereford, 
Aberdeen  Angus  and  polled  Durham  cattle,  which  are  distributed  over  the 
five  large  farms  which  he  owns.  He  resides  on  what  is  known  as  the  Wood- 
lawn  farm  at  the  edge  of  the  town.  His  landed  possessions,  however,  aggregate 
sixteen  hundred  acres.  In  connection  with  John  N.  Harpham  he  built  what 
is  known  as  the  Harpham  &  Williams  building,  at  the  corner  of  Third  and 
Locust  streets,  one  of  the  fine  business  blocks  of  Sterling.  He  is  a  most  excel- 
lent judge  of  live-stock  and  his  investments  have  been  judiciously  made.  In 
all  of  his  business  interests  he  displays  sound  judgment  and  keen  sagacity. 

On  the  21st  of  April,  1898,  Mr.  Williams  was  married  to  Miss  Olive 
Wood,  a  daughter  of  Thomas  Wood,  but  she  died  on  the  13th  of  July,  just 
three  months  after  her  marriage.  On  the  31st  of  March,  1903,  Mr.  Williams 
was  joined  in  wedlock  to  Miss  Jennie  Hoover,  a  daughter  of  David  and  Mar- 


668  HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY 

garet  (Graybill)  Hoover.  They  have  two  children,  Virginia  and  Jackson 
Taylor.  Mrs.  Williams  is  a  member  of  the  Methodist  church  and  a  most 
estimable  lady.  Her  paternal  grandfather  was  John  Hoover,  who  became  an 
early  resident  of  Whiteside  count}7  and  here  spent  his  remaining  days.  His 
wife  was  a  Miss  Sprecher.  The  maternal  grandfather  was  John  Graybill,  a 
native  of  Pennsylvania,  who  cast  in  his  lot  with  the  pioneer  residents  of 
Ogle  county,  Illinois.  The  parents  of  Mrs.  Jennie  Williams  were  natives  of 
Pennsylvania  and  became  early  settlers  of  Whiteside  county,  her  father  here 
following  the  occupation  of  farming.  He  died  March  13,  1900,  at  the  age 
of  sixty-four  years,  and  is  still  survived  by  his  wife.  They  had  two  children 
but  the  elder  daughter,  Florence  May,  died  at  the  age  of  three  years. 

In  his  political  views  Mr.  Williams  is  a  stalwart  republican  but  the  honors 
and  emoluments  of  office  have  had  no  attraction  for  him,  as  he  has  preferred 
to  concentrate  his  energies  upon  his  business  affairs.  As  a  business  man  he 
has  been  conspicuous  among  his  associates  not  only  for  his  success  but  for  his 
probity,  fairness  and  honorable  methods.  In  everything  he  has  been  eminently 
practical  and  this  has  been  manifest  not  only  in  his  business  undertakings 
but  also  in  social  and  private  life.  His  activity  as  a  live-stock  dealer  has  not 
only  contributed  to  his  individual  success  but  has  also  been  a  factor  in  agri- 
cultural progress,  as  he  has  done  much  to  improve  the  grade  of  stock  raised  and 
thereby  advance  prices.  He  is  yet  a  young  man  but  has  already  attained  a 
notable  measure  of  success,  making  him  one  of  the  prosperous  residents  of 
Sterling. 


GEORGE  W.  BREWER. 

No  resident  of  Whiteside  county  has  so  long  resided  within  its  borders 
as  George  W.  Brewer,  who  dates  his  residence  here  from  1837.  The  history 
of  early  settlement  would  be  incomplete  without  his  record,  for  from  the 
early  founding  of  the  town  he  has  been  a  prominent  factor  in  its  substantial 
growth  and  improvement.  The  land  was  largely  in  the  primitive  condition 
in  which  it  came  from  the  hand  of  nature  and  through  his  agency  much  of 
it  has  been  reclaimed  for  the  purposes  of  cultivation.  He  has  as  the  years 
have  gone  by  purchased  and  sold  large  tracts  of  land  in  the  county  and  his 
business  operations  have  always  been  carefully  conducted,  making  his  invest- 
ments profitable.  Now  in  his  declining  years  he  is  living  retired,  enjoying  a 
well-earned  rest,  which  is  the  merited  reward  of  a  long  and  honorable  busi- 
ness career. 

Mr.  Brewer  was  born  about  eight  miles  from  Cooperstown,  in  Otsego 
county,  New  York,  on  the  6th  of  May,  1827,  his  parents  being  Henry  and 
Lucinda  (Johnson)  Brewer,  who  were  also  natives  of  the  Empire  state.  The 
paternal  grandfather  was  a  soldier  of  the  Revolutionary  war  and  of  German 
descent.  Henry  Brewer  was  a  wagonmaker  by  trade  and  followed  that  pur- 
suit during  the  greater  part  of  his  life.  In  1836  he  came  to  the  middle  west 
to  look  over  the  country  and  in  the  fall  returned  to  the  east.  The  following 


LWWW 

0    '.  >i- 
W!!VERs'ln  ')»  ' 


HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY  671 


Necessity     however,    is    the    mother    of    invention,    and   he 

±rs  Lcny  atcsfrie-hisrrnei'  eventuaiiy  iandins    " 

iamily  at  St.  Louis.    From  that  point  they  went  to  Rock 
passengers  on  another  boat.     While  at  St.  Louis  Mr.  Brewer  met  a 
Mason,  and  giving  the  sign  of  distress,  received  a  loan  of  sixty^ol 

whS'c±tv    A"sisted  him,  with  teams  on  his  way  to  *  a2 

partf  ft  St   Lo'         tSS  SH^S  ^  °CCUIWd'  however«  before  the 

bt.  Louis.    Some  time  before  leaving  the  wharf  Henry  Brewer  left 

it      Th  ^/t^  f  I0ng  that  "  W3S  feared  some  accident^ad  befal  e 

him.     The  doubts  and  fears  of  the  passengers  were  highlv  intensified  by 

port  that  a  man  had  been  murdered  and  his  body  thrown  into  the  river 
Mrs.   Brewer   was   m   great   distress   of  mind   and   a  second   report   tha 
man  who  had  tried  to  walk  the  gang  plank  and  get  into  the  bo't  had  t^t 
fallen  into  the  river  by  no  means  calmed  her  alarm.     She  felt  sur    that 
rmist  have  been  her  husband  and  lighted  a  tallow  candle  to  go  to  the    ear  o 
the  boat  and  see  if  the  body  would  appear.     There  was  no  guard    a  1  at  the 

tern  of  the  vessel  and  in  the  darkness  she  walked  right  off  L  boat  and    el 
into  the  river.     A  man  in  the  crowd  suggested  starting  the  paddle  wheel  to 
working  as  the  only  hope  of  bringing  her  body  to  the  surface.     Thieved 

o  be  a  good  suggestion,  for  in  a  few  seconds  Mrs.  Brewer  appeared   clhg  n! 

"helld  tl  til      *     ,f  "^l  ^  *  ^  Pa(WIe  whed>  ^  in  ^^ 
he  held  the  tallow  candle.    The  men  assisted  her  to  get  aboard  the  boat  a 

while  she  stood  amid  the  large  crowd  of  passengers  afl  gathered  around  her 
the  water  dripping  from  her  clothing,  her  husband  suddenly  appeared  up^n 


re.rfoutb  and  here        nry 

fn    T   T  [rame  °f  a  h°USe'  but  there  was  no  roof  uPon  it.    Later  he 

hl          ** 


m  de  therH  ee'    n  e          fly 

made    heir  home  for  about  six  weeks.     They  next  moved  into  a  log  cabin 

m  Portland  township  which  had  a  hole  in  it  for  a  window  and  also  a 

'  buthere         "°  floor  -d  «  ^b.e  end  nor  was  Z  Tb  n 


Th  f,  was  n 

.     They  lived  there,  however,  for  a  few  months  and  in  February  of 
he  following  year  removed  to  what  was  then  Harrisburg.  making  a  permn- 
nont  sett  ement  upon  ground  that  is  now  part  of  the  site  of  Sterling^  the 
head  of  the  rapids  of  Rock  river,  another  town  called  Chatham  being  „ 
footof  the  rapids.     The  first  settler  here  was  a  man  by  the  name  of  HezeHah 


Henry  Brewer  could  not  find  work  at  his  trade  of  wagon-makine  and 
therefore  turned  hi.s  attention  to  carpentering  for  a  time,  a»Mne  in  buildin 
a  number  of  the  first  houses  of  the  county,  the  timber  for  which  wa,  cut  anS 

1  right  on  the  ground,  parties  wanting  to  improve  the  land  bavin*  free 
access  to  the  timber  on  the  town  site.  The  shingles  were  made,  cut  and 
shaved  by  hand.  Mr.  Brewer  aided  in  large  measure  in  the  pionee  develop 


672  HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY 

ment  of  the  community  and  witnessed  a  most  wonderful  transformation  as 
the  years  passed  by.  As  soon  as  he  could  he  built  a  house  and  wagon  shop 
for  himself,  hauling  logs  to  Brink's  sawmill,  which  was  built  after  his 
arrival  in  the  county.  He  split  out  spokes  and  seasoned  them  and  bought 
plank  at  the  mill  and  seasoned  that,  after  which  he  built  his  wagons,  con- 
tinuing in  the  business  until  his  death,  which  occurred  February  27,  1848. 
He  was  then  aged  fifty-nine  years,  two  months  and  twenty-nine  days.  His 
wife  survived  him  until  January  6,  1867,  and  had  reached  the  age  of  seventy- 
eight  years  and  nine  days  at  the  time  of  her  demise.  Both  were  consistent 
members  of  the  Universalist  church. 

In  their  family  of  nine  children,  five  sons  and  four  daughters,  George 
W.  Brewer  is  the  only  one  now  living.  He  was  ten  years  of  age  at  the  time 
the  family  made  their  memorable  trip  from  the  Empire  state  to  Illinois,  and 
during  intervening  years  Whiteside  county  has  continuously  been  his  home. 
In  fact,  he  lives  upon  an  adjoining  block  to  the  one  on  which  his  father  settled 
in  what  is  now  Sterling  and  has  never  moved  but  once.  His  boyhood  days 
were  spent  in  work  in  his  father's  shop,  where  he  thoroughly  mastered  the 
wagonmaker's  trade,  and  after  his  father's  death  he  became  his  successor  and 
carried  on  the  business  for  five  years.  He  then  traded  the  shop  for  a  farm 
in  Sterling  township  and  for  a  considerable  period  bought,  improved  and 
sold  land,  but  always  made  his  home  in  the  city,  he  and  his  wife  having 
lived  for  fifty-one  years  on  one  corner.  In  his  investments  in  property  he 
showed  wise  judgment  and  keen  discernment,  and  his  carefully  conducted 
business  interests  brought  to  him  a  gratifying  measure  of  prosperity. 

Mr.  Brewer  was  married  in  Walworth  county,  Wisconsin,  on  the  4th  of 
March,  1851,  to  Miss  Elizabeth  S.  Green,  a  daughter  of  David  and  Ruth 
(Southwick)  Green.  His  father  having  died,  Mr.  Brewer  moved  with  his 
bride  into  the  home  of  his  mother  and  there  lived  for  five  years,  after  which 
he  took  his  household  effects  to  his  present  home,  which  he  has  built  up  and 
improved  as  the  years  have  gone  by  until  it  is  now  a  fine  residence  property. 

Ten  children  have  been  born  unto  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Brewer,  four  sons  and 
six  daughters,  of  whom  four  are  yet  living:  Delora  Elizabeth  is  the  wife  of 
Isaac  S.  Bressler,  a  resident  of  Jordan  township,  and  they  have  three  chil- 
dren, Fred  Nelson,  George  Brewer  and  Carrie  Elizabeth.  Orra  Leona  is  the 
wife  of  John  Bressler,  living  near  Sterling,  and  they  have  one  son,  Harry 
Brewer  Bressler.  Carrie  May  is  the  wife  of  William  P.  Northcott,  of  La 
Grange,  Illinois,  and  their  children  are  Horace  Brewer,  Ruth  Elizabeth  and 
Florence  Harriet.  Myrtie  Mabel  is  the  wife  of  Charles  Otis  Lipp,  a  resident 
of  Aurora,  Illinois,  and  they  have  three  children,  Helen  Elizabeth,  Evelyn 
Lucile  and  Charles  Williams.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Brewer  have  two  great-grand- 
children, Gladys  Carrie  Bressler  and  Edward  Nelson  Bressler.  Those  of  the 
family  now  deceased  are:  Emma,  born  March  26,  1856;  George  N.,  born 
August  12,  1857;  Hattie  L.,  born  June  18,  1859;  Charles  D.,  born  December 
8,  1860;  William  H.,  born  November  30,  1863;  and  Eddie  C.,  born  June  6, 
1866. 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  Brewer  are  members  of  the  Methodist  church,  she  being 
a  charter  member  of  the  church  at  Sterling,  and  they  have  lived  lives  of 


HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY  673 

uprightness  and  integrity,  gaining  for  them  the  respect  of  all  with  whom 
they  have  been  brought  in  contact.  Politically  Mr.  Brewer  is  a  republican, 
giving  stalwart  support  to  the  party  since  its  organization.  For  about  thirty 
years  he  served  as  a  school  director,  was  also  alderman  for  a  number  of  years 
and  township  collector,  discharging  his  official  duties  with  promptness  and 
fidelity. 

In  the  early  days  of  his  residence  here  he  hauled  grain  from  Sterling  to 
Chicago  with  an  ox  team,  making  his  first  trip  before  he  attained  his  ma- 
jority and  receiving  ten  dollars  for  his  load  of  wheat,  which  sold  for  fifty 
cents  per  bushel  and  he  received  twenty-five  cents  per  bushel  for  hauling  it. 
Nine  dollars  of  the  same  was  expended  for  a  thousand  feet  of  barn  boards, 
some  of  which  are  still  in  the  gable  of  his  barn.  When  making  the  trips  to 
market  in  that  way  the  early  settlers  camped  out  at  nights  and  took  pro- 
visions with  them  for  the  meals  on  the  journey.  There  is  particular  satisfac- 
tion in  reverting  to  the  life  history  of  this  honored  and  venerable  gentleman, 
since  his  mind  bears  the  impress  of  the  historic  annals  of  the  state  from 
early  pioneer  days  and  also  from  the  fact  that  he  has  attained  to  a  position 
of  distinctive  prominence  in  the  thriving  city  where  he  has  retained  his 
residence  from  1837  until  the  present  time,  being  now  one  of  the  revered 
patriarchs  of  the  community. 


JOSEPH  C.  SNYDER. 

Joseph  C.  Snyder,  one  of  the  prominent,  energetic  and  successful  business 
men  of  Fulton,  whose  labors  contribute  to  general  prosperity  as  well  as  to  in- 
dividual interests,  is  today  engaged  in  dealing  in  grain,  fuel  and  building 
materials.  The  recognition  of  his  personal  worth  on  the  part  of  his  fellow- 
men  has  been  manifest  in  his  election  to  various  positions  of  public  honor  and 
trust.  He  has  been  Fulton's  chief  executive  and  postmaster  and  is  now  filling 
the  office  of  county  supervisor.  His  birth  occurred  in  Fulton,  November  14, 
1857,  his  parents  being  William  C.  and  Isyphene  C.  (Pearce)  Snyder,  natives 
of  New  Jersey  and  Rhode  Island  respectively.  They  came  to  Illinois  in  1849, 
immediately  after  their  marriage,  which  was  celebrated  in  Clinton  county, 
Iowa.  Establishing  their  home  in  Fulton,  Mr.  Snyder  engaged  in  the  grain 
business,  which  he  made  his  principal  occupation,  although  he  also  extended 
his  efforts  to  other  fields  of  activity.  Pie  was  prominent  in  public  affairs  of 
the  community  and  in  1861  was  appointed  postmaster  of  Fulton  by  President 
Lincoln,  filling  the  position  for  twenty  years.  During  the  fall  of  1882  he  was 
elected  to  represent  his  district  in  the  state  senate,  where  he  served  for  one 
term.  He  occupied  other  official  positions  in  the  county,  including  that  of 
drainage  commissioner,  discharging  his  duties  with  credit  to  himself  and  satis- 
faction to  his  constituents.  His  life  was  characterized  by  a  lofty  patriotism 
and  an  unfaltering  devotion  to  what  he  believed  to  be  right,  whether  in 
political  circles,  in  business  or  in  any  other  relation  of  life.  He  died  in  May, 
1902,  and  is  still  survived  by  his  widow,  who  yet  resides  in  Fulton.  They  were 


674  HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY 

the  parents  of  eight  children  of  whom  the  eldest  died  in  infancy.  The  others 
are:  Kate  C.,  now  the  wife  of  Thomas  ,T.  Pickett,  a  resident  of  Wahoe, 
Nebraska;  Martha  C.,  who  is  the  widow  of  Jerome  C.  Neff  and  is  living  in  New 
Jersey;  Annie  E.,  the  wife  of  Albert  Stetson,  of  Los  Angeles,  California; 
Joseph  C.,  of  this  review;  James  J.,  who  married  Minnie  Mickelsen,  of  Mor- 
rison, Illinois,  but  is  now  deceased;  C.  Henry,  a  resident  of  Berkeley,  Califor- 
nia; and  Lena  V.,  now  of  Fulton. 

Joseph  C.  Snyder  pursued  his  education  in  the  public  schools  of  Fulton 
and  at  the  age  of  fifteen  years  started  out  upon  his  business  career  as  a  printer's 
"devil."  He  served  for  nine  years  in  the  printing  office  and  in  1881  became  his 
father's  associate  as  dealer  in  grain,  feed,  fuel  and  building  materials,  in  which 
line  his  father  had  been  eminently  successful.  The  business  relation  between 
them  continued  until  the  father's  death  and  Mr.  Snyder  has  since  carried  on 
operations  alone.  He  controls  a  large  annual  trade  in  these  lines  and  is 
numbered  among  the  energetic  business  men  whose  labors  are  an  element  in 
promoting  commercial  prosperity  here. 

Mr.  Snyder  was  married  on  the  29th  of  March,  1885,  to  Miss  Hattie  L. 
Noble,  a  daughter  of  Hiram  and  Sophie  E.  (Summers)  Noble,  who  came 
to  Fulton  prior  to  their  marriage.  Mr.  Noble  arrived  August  18,  1856,  while 
his  wife  removed  to  this  place  from  Sterling  at  an  earlier  date.  They  were 
thus  pioneer  residents  of  the  county  and  were  interested  witnesses  of  its  early 
development  as  well  as  its  later  day  progress.  Unto  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Noble  were 
born  five  children,  of  whom  three  reached  years  of  maturity:  Mrs.  Snyder; 
Harry  B.,  of  Fulton;  and  Elizabeth,  the  wife  of  Charles  S.  Ruaile,  of  Mason 
City,  Iowa.  Unto  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Snyder  have  been  born  five  children:  Ada, 
Belle,  Paul  N.,  Earl  C.  and  Byron  J. 

Mr.  Snyder  has  served  his  town  for  one  term  as  postmaster  and  has  also 
been  mayor  of  the  city.  He  has  likewise  been  a  member  of  the  board  of 
aldermen  and  of  the  school  board  and  takes  an  active  interest  in  politics  as 
a  life-long  republican,  who  does  everything  in  his  power  to  promote  the  growth 
and  insure  the  success  of  his  party.  In  1906  he  was  elected  to  the  office  of 
county  supervisor  and  has  been  one  of  the  active  members  of  the  board,  doing 
much  effective  service  for  the  interests  of  the  county.  His  loyalty  and 
patriotism  are  salient  characteristics  in  his  life  record  and  he  stands  today 
as  one  of  the  prominent  factors  in  the  business  circles  of  Fulton — a  man 
whose  worth  and  ability  have  gained  him  success,  honor  and  public  confidence. 


FREDERICK  W.  ULRICH. 

The  growth  and  development  of  a  city  depends  not  so  much  upon  its 
machinery  of  government  or  even  upon  the  men  who  fill  its  public  offices  as 
it  does  upon  those  who  represent  its  commercial  and  industrial  activity.  To 
the  latter  class  belongs  Mr.  Ulrich,  a  manufacturer  of  improved  garden  tools 
and  implements  at  Rock  Falls.  He  was  born  in  Schlessen,  Germany,  July  22, 
1854,  a  son  of  Gottfried  and  Susanna  Ulrich,  who  were  likewise  natives  of 


HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY  675 

the  fatherland.  There  also  occurred  the  birth  of  the  grandparents  of  our 
subject,  who  spent  their  entire  lives  in  Germany.  The  maternal  grandfather 
engaged  in  the  lumber  business  there.  Gottfried  Ulrich  became  a  farmer  of 
Germany  and  was  identified  with  agricultural  interests  until  1865,  when  he 
sailed  for  the  new  world,  settling  in  Milwaukee,  Wisconsin,  where  he  worked 
as  a  laborer.  In  1893  he  came'  to  Rock  Falls  to  live  with  his  son  Frederick, 
with  whom  he  remained  for  three  or  four  years,  and  then  went  to  Gutten- 
berg,  Iowa,  where  lie  resided  until  his  death  on  the  31st  of  January,  1898. 
He  had  reached  the  venerable  age  of  ninety-two  years,  and  his  wife,  still  sur- 
viving, lives  in  Guttenberg,  Iowa,  at  the  age  of  eighty-five.  They  were  con- 
sistent in  their  religious  faith  as  members  of  the  Lutheran  church  and  always 
attempted  to  follow  closely  the  teachings  of  that  denomination. 

Frederick  \V.  Ulrich  was  a  lad  of  eleven  years  when  he  accompanied  his 
parents  on  their  emigration  to  the  United  States.  The  father  landed  a  poor 
man,  having  spent  all  the  money  he  had  accumulated  to  bring  his  family 
to  this  country.  He  believed,  however,  that  he  would  have  better  opportunity 
here  for  achieving  financial  independence  nor  was  he  disappointed  in  this 
hope,  for  as  the  years  passed  by  he  became  prosperous  and  died  leaving  a  com- 
petency. His  son  Frederick  was  reared  in  Milwaukee,  Wisconsin,  and  in 
Michigan  and  had  the  advantage  of  instruction  in  a  parochial  school  con- 
ducted under  the  teachings  of  the  German  Lutheran  church.  He  was  con- 
firmed in  that  church  when  about  fourteen  years  of  age. 

At  the  age  of  sixteen  he  started  to  learn  the  machinist's  trade,  working  for 
a  dollar  and  a  half  per  week  and  boarding  at  home  for  a  year.  His  employer 
then  went  to  Manistee,  Michigan,  where  he  conducted  a  machine  shop  and 
foundry,  and  Mr.  .Ulrich  accompanied  him  and  remained  in  his  employ  for 
another  year,  receiving  as  a  compensation  three  dollars  per  week  and  hi>* 
board.  That  he  was  faithful  and  able  in  his  service  is  indicated  by  the  fact 
that  he  remained  with  that  employer  for  four  years  and  during  the  latter  part 
of  the  third  year  he  was  given  two  dollars  and  a  quarter  per  day,  while  still 
later  he  received  higher  wages.  He  had  continually  advanced  in  efficiency, 
becoming  an  expert  workman.  Returning  to  Milwaukee  Mr.  Ulrich  entered 
the  employ  of  the  Queen  City  Iron  Works,  with  which  he  was  connected  for 
four  years,  and  later  was  employed  by  the  E.  B.  Allis  Company  for  a  short 
time.  With  five  others  he  then  formed  a  partnership  and  engaged  in  the 
manufacture  of  bits,  augers  and  various  wood  cutting  tools  at  Rockford,  Illi- 
nois. A  year  later  he  sold  his  interest  in  that  enterprise  and  came  to  Rock 
Falls,  joining  E.  F.  Brock  &  Company,  manufacturing  garden  tools  and  novel- 
ties. He  remained  with  that  firm  for  about  three  years  and  then  embarked  in 
business  on  his  own  account  in  1885  in  the  Industrial  building,  now  the 
Lawrence  building  in  Rock  Falls.  He  manufactured  butter  tub  machinery 
and  conducted  a  machine  shop,  this  being  the  foundation  of  his  present  busi- 
ness— the  manufacture  of  improved  garden  tools  and  implements.  His  an- 
nual output  is  now  extensive  and  his  product  is  sold  to  jobbers,  dealers,  agents 
and  also  to  consumers.  From  the  establishment  of  the  business  it  has  con- 
stantly developed  in  growth  and  importance,  and  in  1899  the  extent  of  his 
trade  justified  the  erection  of  his  present  factory,  which  is  located  on  the 


676  HISTORY    OF   WHITESIDE    COUNTY 

east  side  of  Third  street  near  the  tracks  of  the  Chicago,  Burlington  &  Quincy 
Railroad.  The  plant  is  well  equipped  with  the  latest  improved  machinery 
and  the  house  sustains  an  unassailable  reputation  for  the  character  of  its 
goods  and  the  reliability  of  its  product?. 

On  the  15th  of  September,  1879,  Mr.  Ulrich  was  married  to  Miss  Harriet 
Amelia  Lovelace,  and  they  had  three  children.  William  Julius,  Edward  and 
Frederick  Simon,  but  the  first  named  was  drowned  at  the  age  of  ten  years. 
The  second  son  is  now  living  in  New  York  city,  while  the  youngest  son  is  in 
his  father's  employ.  He  possesses  a  studious  nature  and  a  religious  trend  of 
mind  and  does  some  preaching  in  the  Christian  church,  with  which  he  holds 
membership.  He  was  a  soldier  of  the  Spanish- American  war,  serving  in  the 
Philippines  until  his  discharge  as  civilian  scout  with  the  Seventeenth  Tlakana 
Scouts  on  the  island  of  Mindora. 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  Ulrich  are  members  of  the  Christian  church  and  are  greatly 
esteemed  in  the  community  as  people  of  genuine  worth.  Mr.  Ulrich  belongs 
to  the  Modern  Woodmen  Camp  and  to  the  Mystic  Workers,  and  his  attitude 
on  the  temperance  question  is  indicated  by  the  fact  that  he  gives  his  support 
to  the  prohibition  party.  He  resides  at  No.  502  Dixon  avenue,  where  he 
erected  a  pleasant  home  in  1902.  His  influence  is  always  found  on  the  side 
of  justice,  truth,  right  and  progress,  and  this  is  manifest  in  his  social  relations 
and  in  his  attitude  toward  public  interests  as  well  as  in  his  business  career. 


D.  G.  ACKERMAN. 

The  year  1858  witnessed  the  arrival  of  D.  G.  Ackerman  in  Whiteside 
county  but  he  remained  only  a  short  time  and  returned  to  his  old  home  in 
New  Jersey.  In  1876,  however,  he  came  again  and  has  since  resided  within 
the  borders  of  the  county.  The  place  of  his  nativity  was  Paterson,  New  Jersey, 
and  his  natal  day  February  13,  1832.  His  parents,  Garret  and  Elizabeth 
(Watson)  Ackerman,  were  representatives  of  old  families  of  New  Jersey  and 
were  well  known  fanning  people  there.  They  never  left  the  east  and  passed 
away  in  New  Jersey  many  years  ago. 

D.  G.  Ackerman  is  the  only  survivor  of  the  family  of  five  children.  He 
was  reared  in  the  east  and  has  always  followed  the  trade  of  a  mason  and  builder, 
although  in  early  life  he  was  also  connected  with  agricultural  interests  and  of 
later  years  has  again  taken  to  farming.  He  was  married  first  in  New  Jersey 
to  Miss  Elizabeth  Perrine,  who  died  in  that  state  leaving  one  son,  Ira,  who 
passed  away  at  the  age  of  twenty-two  years.  For  hi-  second  wife  Mr.  Acker- 
man chose  Miss  Elizabeth  Ackerman,  who  passed  away  in  New  Jersey,  leaving 
two  children.  William  and  Elizabeth,  the  former  now  deceased  and  the  latter 
the  wife  of  W.  C.  Wink,  a  resident  of  Missouri. 

As  previously  stated,  T).  G.  Ackerman  came  to  Whiteside  county  in  1858 
and  here  spent  the  summer  but  was  not  then  ready  to  make  Illinois  his  place 
of  residence  and  returning  to  New  Jersey  there  remained  until  the  spring  of 
1876.  He  then  again  came  to  Illinois  and  has  since  made  his  home  here. 
On  the  4th  of  November.  1879,  he  married  Mrs.  Robert  McKay,  nee  Catherine 


HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY  677 

Blue,  who  was  born  in  Toronto,  Canada,  August  17,  1839,  a  daughter  of 
Donald  and  Catherine  (McFarland)  Blue,  both  of  whom  were  natives  of 
the  highlands  of  Scotland  and  on  crossing  the  Atlantic  settled  in  the  United 
States.  Two  years  later  they  removed  to  Toronto,  Canada,  and  in  the  fall  of 
1839  came  to  Illinois,  establishing  their  home  in  Clyde  township,  Whiteside 
county.  Here  the  father  carried  on  general  agricultural  pursuits  until  he 
retired.  Putting  aside  business  cares,  he  removed  to  Morrison,  where  he  lived 
for  eighteen  years.  His  wife  died  there  at  the  age  of  eighty-four  years  and  he 
afterward  lived  for  two  years  again  upon  the  farm  prior  to  his  demise,  which 
occurred  in  1890,  when  he  had  reached  the  very  remarkable  old  age  of  nine- 
ty-two years. 

Mrs.  Ackerman  was  one  of  eleven  children,  of  whom  four  died  in  in- 
fancy, while  a  brother  died  at  the  age  of  seventeen  years  and  a  sister  at  the 
age  of  eleven.  The  other  six  reached  years  of  maturity.  Of  these  Alexander 
went  to  California  in  1852,  after  which  he  returned  to  the  middle  west.  In 
1858  he  started  with  his  brothers,  Donald  and  Charles,  for  Pike's  Peak  and 
they  were  lost  in  one  of  the  severe  storms  of  the  plains.  Two  of  them  starved 
to  death  but  the  youngest  was  found  by  the  Indians  and  cared  for  by  them. 
He  afterward  came  home  and  is  still  living.  The  sisters  were :  Isabella,  who 
is  the  widow  of  John  Brett,  a  resident  of  Washington;  and  Jane,  who  be- 
came the  wife  of  John  Wilson,  a  resident  of  Clyde  township.  Both  are  now 
deceased.  They  had  two  daughters  and  three  sons,  who  reside  in  this  county, 
while  another  daughter  lives  at  Freeport,  Illinois,  and  a  daughter  and  son  are 
residents  of  Evanston,  Illinois. 

Mrs.  Ackerman  is  one  of  the  few  remaining  -pioneer  settlers  of  Whiteside 
county.  Her  people  were  among  the  first  to  locate  here  when  every  evidence  of 
the  frontier  was  to  be  found.  Wild  game  was  to  be  had  in  abundance  and  one 
could  travel  for  miles  across  the  prairie  without  coming  to  any  sign  of  habita- 
tion. Mrs.  Ackerman  attended  the  private  schools  of  that  early  day  and  was 
trained  in  the  duties  of  the  household,  thus  becoming  well  qualified  to  take 
charge  of  a  home  of  her  own  at  the  time  of  her  marriage.  On  the  24th  of  No- 
vember, 1868.  she  became  the  wife  of  Robert  McKay,  who  was  born  near  To- 
ronto, Canada,  in  1837,  and  was  there  reared.  He  became  a  resident  of  Morri- 
son in  1859  and  entered  the  blacksmith's  shop  of  Mr.  Stocking.  He  was,  thus 
employed  at  his  trade  until  1867,  when  he  purchased  the  farm  just  north  of 
Malvern  which  was  the  home  of  Mrs.  Ackerman  until  destroyed  by  fire  January 
31,  1908.  Unto  Mr.  and  Mrs.  McKay  were  born  two  children:  Charles  Neil, 
who  died  at  the  age  of  ten  years;  and  Donald  G.,  who  has  taught  school  and 
engaged  in  the  life  insurance  business  but  is  now  following  farming.  He 
married  Olive  Wink,  a  native  of  Whiteside  county,  and  they  have  four  daugh- 
ters and  a  son :  Iva  May,  Mildred  L.,  Gertrude  Althea,  Catherine  Elizabeth 
and  Donald.  The  death  of  Robert  McKay  occurred  in  Morrison  in  the  fall 
of  1874.  Mrs.  McKay  afterward  became  the  wife  of  D.  G.  Ackerman,  and  to 
them  was  born  one  son,  Garret,  who  died  in  1905,  at  the  age  of  twenty-six 
years. 

Mr.  Ackerman  is  a  democrat  in  his  political  preference,  but  has  never 
held  political  or  other  office,  preferring  to  concentrate  his  energies  upon  his 


678  HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY 

business  affairs  and  private  interests.  He  was  a  member  of  the  American 
Mechanics  and  of  the  Odd  Fellows  Society.  Mrs.  Ackerman  is  a  member  of 
the  Dunkard  church.  He  has  for  more  than  thirty  years  resided  in  the 
county,  while  Mrs.  Ackerman  is  one  of  the  best  known  pioneer  women,  and  a 
representative  of  one  of  the  oldest  families.  Their  good  qualities  have  gained 
them  lasting  friendships,  and  the  fact  that  those  who  have  known  them  long- 
est are  numbered  among  their  warmest  friends  is  an  indication  that  their 
life  principles  are  such  as  awaken  confidence,  trust  and  high  regard.  They 
are  now  living  in  Malvern. 


ALBERT  JUDSON  JACKSON. 

Among  the  earnest  men  whose  depth  of  character  and  strict  adherence 
to  principle  excite  the  admiration  of  his  contemporaries,  Albert  J.  Jackson  is 
prominent.  Banking  institutions  are  the  heart  of  the  commercial  body,  indi- 
cating the  healthfulness  of  trade,  and  the  bank  that  follows  a  safe,  conserva- 
tive business  policy  does  more  to  establish  public  confidence  in  times  of  wide- 
spread financial  depression  than  anything  else.  Such  a  course  has  the  First 
National  Bank  of  Morrison  followed  under  the  able  management  of  its 
cashier  and  other  officers.  From  its  organization  Mr.  Jackson  has  served  as 
cashier  and  thus  occupies  a  prominent  position  in  financial  circles,  while  in 
many  other  ways,  but  always  quietly  and  unostentatiously,  he  has  contrib- 
uted to  the  development  of  the  city. 

He  was  born  in  Knox  county,  Ohio,  May  12,  1837.  His  father,  Na- 
thaniel M.  Jackson,  was  a  native  of  New  Jersey,  born  May  20,  1803,  and 
when  a  lad  accompanied  his  parents  on  their  removal  to  Knox  county,  Ohio. 
He  was  of  English  ancestry  and  his  grandfather,  Benjamin  Jackson,  served  as 
a  sergeant  in  a  Morris  county  (N.  J.)  organization  in  the  Revolutionary 
war.  He  was  at  Valley  Forge  during  the  memorable  winter  there  spent  by 
the  colonial  troops  and  proved  his  loyalty  through  the  sufferings  which  he 
endured.  His  son,  Ziba  Jackson,  father  of  Nathaniel,  served  as  a  soldier  in 
the  war  of  1812.  Nathaniel  Jackson  was  reared  to  the  occupation  of  farming 
and  at  an  early  period  in  the  development  of  Knox  county,  Ohio,  there  pur- 
chased land,  which  he  transformed  into  a  good  farm,  bringing  it  under  a 
high  state  of  cultivation.  He  held  membership  in  the  Presbyterian  church, 
took  a  great  interest  in  the  church  work  and  for  many  years  served  as  one  of 
its  elders.  In  politics  he  was  originally  an  old-line  whig  and  afterward  be- 
came a  supporter  of  the  free-soil  party,  while  subsequently  he  joined  the 
ranks  of  the  new  republican  party,  formed  to  prevent  the  further  extension 
of  slavery.  He  held  a  number  of  township  offices  and  was  a  man  of  influ- 
ence in  the  community  in  which  he  lived. 

On  leaving  Ohio,  Nathaniel  Jackson  removed  to  Illinois  in  1854,  set- 
tling on  section  18,  Mount  Pleasant  township,  Whiteside  county,  where  he 
purchased  and  improved  a  tract  of  land.  He  was  associated  with  others  in 
laying  out  the  town  of  Morrison,  a  part  of  which  was  situated  on  forty  acres 


LIBRARY 

OF  TH€ 

UNIVERSITY  OF  ILLINOIS 


LlBHAtir 

O    !H£ 

UNIVERSITY  OF  ILLINOIS 


HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY  083 

of  land  owned  by  Mr.  Jackson.  In  his  later  years  he  retired  from  farming 
and  established  his  home  in  Morrison,  where  he  purchased  a  residence.  In 
the  meantime,  however,  he  had  bought  a  farm  at  Prairie  Center,  where  he 
had  lived  for  about  twelve  years.  At  one  time  he  served  on  the  city  council 
of  Morrison  and  in  1874-5  was  mayor  of  the  city,  to  which  he  gave  a  public- 
spirited  and  business-like  administration.  He  died  in  April,  1890,  while  his 
wife  passed  away  in  1881.  She  bore  the  maiden  name  of  Harriet  Nightser 
and  was  born  in  Morris  county,  New  Jersey,  July  25,  1811.  She  came  of 
Holland  Dutch  ancestry  and  was  a  daughter  of  John  and  Abigail  Nightssr, 
who  on  leaving  the  east  removed  to  Ohio.  The  marriage  of  Mr.  and  Mrs. 
Jackson  was  celebrated  in  Knox  county  of  the  latter  state.  Mrs.  Jackson  held 
membership  in  the  Presbyterian  church  and  was  a  devoted  wife  and  mother. 
By  her  marriage  she  had  four  children :  Albert  J.,  Aaron  Byram,  Jeptha  N. 
and  Mitchell  L.  The  second  son  was  the  first  man  who  enlisted  for  service 
in  the  Civil  war  from  Morrison  and  the  first  from  that  place  to  lay  down  his 
life  upon  the  altar  of  his  country.  He  enlisted  within  a  half  hour  after  the 
news  was  received  that  Fort  Sumter  had  been  fired  upon,  becoming  a  member 
of  Company  G,  Thirteenth  Illinois  Infantry,  and  died  in  the  hospital  at 
Holla,  Missouri,  in  October,  1861,  at  the  age  of  twenty-two  years,  while  serv- 
ing as  a  non-commissioned  officer.  Jeptha  N.  Jackson,  who  was  born  in 
Ohio,  October  16,  1843,  served  as  a  member  of  the  Eighth  Illinois  Cavalry, 
which  was  assigned  to  the  Army  of  the  Potomac,  enlisting  first  in  the  one 
hundred  days'  service.  -  He  is  now  a  farmer,  living  in  Union  Grove  town- 
ship. Mitchell  L.,  born  October  14,  1851,  died  in  Kansas. 

Albert  J.  Jackson  was  reared  upon  his  father's  farm  in  Ohio  to  the  age 
of  twenty  years.  He  acquired  his  education  in  the  country  schools  and  after- 
ward engaged  in  teaching  school  for  about  five  months.  On  attaining  his 
majority  he  went  into  the  law  office  of  Joseph  Ware  at  Morrison,  Illinois,' 
under  whose  direction  he  continued  his  reading  for  three  years.  He  was 
then  admitted  to  the  bar  in  the  spring  of  1861  and  began  the  practice  of  law 
in  Morrison.  In  1863  he  formed  a  partnership  with  Orr  F.  Woodruff,  which 
connection  was  continued  for  two  years.  In  1863  he  also  engaged  in  the 
banking  business,  establishing  a  private  bank  under  the  firm  name  of  Stiles 
&  Company.  With  that  institution  he  was  associated  until  December,  1834, 
when  Mr.  Stiles  retired  and  Mr.  Jackson  formed  a  partnership  with  Leander 
Smith,  of  Fulton,  Illinois,  under  the  firm  name  of  L.  Smith  &  Company, 
private  bankers.  This  association  was  maintained  until  January  28,  1865, 
when  the  First  National  Bank  of  Morrison  was  organized  by  Leander  Smith, 
who  was  its  first  president,  while  Mr.  Jackson  became  its  first  cashier,  and 
associated  with  them  as  directors  were  Lester  H.  Robinson,  A.  Nelson  Young, 
Willis  F.  Johnson,  Aaron  C.  Jackson,  Charles  Spears,  William  Spears,  Win- 
field  S.  Wilkinson,  Charles  Shirk  and  James  Snyder.  The  bank  was  capital- 
ized for  fifty  thousand  dollars  and  in  1871  this  was  increased  to  one  hundred 
thousand  dollars.  The  deposits  of  the  bank  for  1865  were  thirty-nine  thou- 
sand two  hundred  and  ninety-four  dollars  and  fifty-one  cents  and  for  the 
year  1906  were  two  hundred  and  sixty-six  thousand  dollars,  a  fact  which 
stands  in  incontrovertible  evidence  of  the  growth  and  success  of  the  institu- 


LiBHAHY 

0'    iH£ 

UNIVERSITY  OF  ILLINOIS 


HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY  683 

of  land  owned  by  Mr.  Jackson.  In  his  later  years  he  retired  from  farming 
and  established  his  home  in  Morrison,  where  he  purchased  a  residence.  In 
the  meantime,  however,  he  had  bought  a  farm  at  Prairie  Center,  where  he 
had  lived  for  about  twelve  years.  At  one  time  he  served  on  the  city  council 
of  Morrison  and  in  1874-5  was  mayor  of  the  city,  to  which  he  gave  a  public- 
spirited  and  business-like  administration.  He  died  in  April,  1890,  while  his 
wife  passed  away  in  1881.  She  bore  the  maiden  name  of  Harriet  Nightser 
and  was  born  in  Morris  county,  New  Jersey,  July  25,  1811.  She  came  of 
Holland  Dutch  ancestry  and  was  a  daughter  of  John  and  Abigail  Nightser, 
who  on  leaving  the  east  removed  to  Ohio.  The  marriage  of  Mr.  and  Mrs. 
Jackson  was  celebrated  in  Knox  county  of  the  latter  state.  Mrs.  Jackson  held 
membership  in  the  Presbyterian  church  and  was  a  devoted  wife  and  mother. 
By  her  marriage  she  had  four  children :  Albert  J.,  Aaron  Byram,  Jeptha  N. 
and  Mitchell  L.  The  second  son  was  the  first  man  who  enlisted  for  service 
in  the  Civil  war  from  Morrison  and  the  first  from  that  place  to  lay  down  his 
life  upon  the  altar  of  his  country.  He  enlisted  within  a  half  hour  after  the 
news  was  received  that  Fort  Sumter  had  been  fired  upon,  becoming  a  member 
of  Company  G,  Thirteenth  Illinois  Infantry,  and  died  in  the  hospital  at 
Holla,  Missouri,  in  October,  1861,  at  the  age  of  twenty-two  years,  while  serv- 
ing as  a  non-commissioned  officer.  Jeptha  N.  Jackson,  who  was  born  in 
Ohio,  October  16,  1843,  served  as  a  member  of  the  Eighth  Illinois  Cavalry, 
which  was  assigned  to  the  Army  of  the  Potomac,  enlisting  first  in  the  one 
hundred  days'  service.  •  He  is  now  a  farmer,  living  in  Union  Grove  town- 
ship. Mitchell  L.,  born  October  14,  1851,  died  in  Kansas. 

Albert  J.  Jackson  was  reared  upon  his  father's  farm  in  Ohio  to  the  age 
of  twenty  years.  He  acquired  his  education  in  the  country  schools  and  after- 
ward engaged  in  teaching  school  for  about  five  months.  On  attaining  his 
majority  he  went  into  the  law  office  of  Joseph  Ware  at  Morrison,  Illinois,' 
under  whose  direction  he  continued  his  reading  for  three  years.  He  was 
then  admitted  to  the  bar  in  the  spring  of  1861  and  began  the  practice  of  law 
in  Morrison.  In  1863  he  formed  a  partnership  with  Orr  F.  Woodruff,  which 
connection  was  continued  for  two  years.  In  1863  he  also  engaged  in  the 
banking  business,  establishing  a  private  bank  under  the  firm  name  of  Stiles 
&  Company.  With  that  institution  he  was  associated  until  December,  1834, 
when  Mr.  Stiles  retired  and  Mr.  Jackson  formed  a  partnership  with  Leander 
Smith,  of  Fulton,  Illinois,  under  the  firm  name  of  L.  Smith  &  Company, 
private  bankers.  This  association  was  maintained  until  January  28,  1865, 
when  the  First  National  Bank  of  Morrison  was  organized  by  Leander  Smith, 
who  was  its  first  president,  while  Mr.  Jackson  became  its  first  cashier,  and 
associated  with  them  as  directors  were  Lester  H.  Robinson,  A.  Nelson  Young, 
Willis  F.  Johnson,  Aaron  C.  Jackson,  Charles  Spears,  William  Spears,  Win- 
field  S.  Wilkinson,  Charles  Shirk  and  James  Snyder.  The  bank  was  capital- 
ized for  fifty  thousand  dollars  and  in  1871  this  was  increased  to  one  hundred 
thousand  dollars.  The  deposits  of  the  bank  for  1865  were  thirty-nine  thou- 
sand two  hundred  and  ninety-four  dollars  and  fifty-one  cents  and  for  the 
year  1906  were  two  hundred  and  sixty-six  thousand  dollars,  a  fact  which 
stands  in  incontrovertible  evidence  of  the  growth  and  success  of  the  institu- 


684  HISTORY    OF   WHITESIDE    COUNTY 

tion.  Mr.  Jackson  still  remains  as  cashier  of  the  bank  and  has  served  contin- 
uously as  a  national  bank  cashier  for  a  longer  period  than  any  other  man 
in  the  United  States.  The  First  National  Bank  of  Morrison  was  the  first 
institution  organized  under  the  national  banking  laws  in  Whiteside  county. 
It  is  one  of  the  conservative  and  substantial  moneyed  institutions  of  this 
part  of  the  state  and  its  success  is  attributable  in  large  measure  to  the  efforts, 
the  executive  ability  and  the  enterprise  of  Mr.  Jackson. 

On  the  15th  of  December,  1863,  Mr.  Jackson  was  married  to  Miss  Jennie 
Quackenbush,  who  was  born  in  Paterson,  New  Jersey,  January  21,  1843,  and 
was  of  Holland  Dutch  descent.  She  speaks  the  language  of  her  ancestors  as 
well  as  the  English  tongue.  Her  parents  were  David  J.  and  Ann  Quacken- 
bush, the  former  a  bricklayer,  who  came  to  Illinois  in  August,  1856,  and 
located  at  Morrison,  where  he  spent  his  remaining  days.  He  was  a  veteran 
of  the  Civil  war,  serving  as  a  member  of  Company  B  Thirty-fourth  Illinois 
Volunteer  Infantry.  Unto  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Jackson  have  been  born  two  sons 
and  a  daughter:  Carl,  in  business  in  South  Dakota;  Kittie,  at  home;  and 
Pierre,  who  is  a  member  of  the  firm  of  Wilkinson  &  Company,  conducting 
an  abstract  business  in  Morrison.  The  wife  and  mother  died  October  8,  1906, 
and  her  death  was  deeply  deplored  by  many  friends  as  well  as  her  immediate 
family. 

Mr.  Jackson  is  a  member  of  the  Presbyterian  church,  in  which  he  is 
serving  as  trustee,  while  in  the  work  of  the  church  he  is  helpfully  interested. 
Fraternally  he  is  connected  with  the  Masons  and  is  also  a  member  of  the 
Bankers'  Association  of  the  state  and  the  National  Bankers'  Association.  His 
political  allegiance  is  given  the  democracy  and  he  served  as  mayor  of  Mor- 
rison in  1876-7.  He  also  filled  the  office  of  deputy  county  treasurer  from 
1858  to  18'61,  inclusive,  and  after  his  retirement  from  that  office  he  enlisted 
in  July,  1861,  for  service  with  the  boys  in  blue  in  the  Civil  war,  joining  Com- 
pany A  of  the  Second  Illinois  Cavalry,  with  which  he  continued  for  a  year. 
He  was  elected  by  his  company  to  the  rank  of  second  lieutenant  and  resigned 
in  1862,  having  been  injured  by  his  horse,  the  result  of  which  unfitted  him 
for  service.  He  is  now  a  member  of  Alpheus  Clark  Post,  No.  118,  G.  A.  R., 
and  served  as  its  commander  in  1900.  He  is  also  a  member  of  the  Loyal 
Legion  of  the  United  States  and  takes  an  active  interest  in  military  affairs 
and  in  his  associations  with  his  old  army  comrades. 


CHARLES  M.  LYTLE. 

Charles  M.  Lytle,  manager  of  the  Rock  Falls  Manufacturing  Company 
on  East  Third  street  in  Sterling,  belongs  to  that  class  of  respected  and  repre- 
sentative American  men  who  owe  their  bu«iness  advancement  and  prosperity 
entirely  to  their  own  efforts.  Early  coming  to  a  realization  of  the  value  of 
industry  and  guiding  his  efforts  by  sound  judgment,  he  has  become  a  force- 
ful factor  in  business  circles  and  since  July,  1905,  has  occupied  his  present 
position  in  Sterling. 


HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY  685 

A  native  of  Pennsylvania,  Mr.  Lytle  was  born  in  Erie  county  near  the 
city  of  Erie,  in  July,  1852,  his  parents  being  Andrew  and  Nancy  Ann  (Mc- 
Kay) Lytle,  also  natives  of  Erie  county.  The  former  was  a  grandson  of  John 
Lytle,  Sr.,  who  came  of  French  Huguenot  ancestry,  the  family  being  founded 
in  America  at  an  early  day.  He  served  as  a  captain  in  the  Revolutionary 
war  and  was  in  charge  of  Fort  Freeland.  His  son,  John  Lytle,  was  born  in  the 
Keystone  state  and  followed  farming  as  a  life  work.  He  was  the  first  repre- 
sentative in  the  legislature  from  the  northwestern  part  of  his  district,  com- 
prising at  that  time  what  is  now  Erie,  Crawford  and  Warren  counties.  Death 
came  to  him  suddenly  in  a  runaway  accident.  His  wife,  Mrs.  Jane  (Ander- 
son) Lytle,  was  more  than  ninety  years  of  age  at  the  time  of  her  demise. 
They  reared  a  large  family. 

The  maternal  grandfather  of  Charles  M.  Lytle  was  John  McKay,  who  was 
born  on  the  borderland  of  Scotland  and  on  coming  to  America  settled  in 
Crawford  county,  Pennsylvania.  Later  he  removed  to  Erie  county,  that 
state,  where  he  died  in  middle  life.  He  had  followed  weaving  to  provide  for 
his  family.  His  wife,  who  in  her  maidenhood  was  Miss  Long,  died  at  an  ad- 
vanced age. 

Andrew  Lytle,  father  of  our  subject,  was  a  tanner  by  trade,  conducting  a 
tannery  on  his  farm  near  Erie  for  many  years.  In  his  later  life  he  lived 
retired,  enjoying  a  well  earned  rest.  In  his  community  he  was  prominent 
and  influential,  served  as  collector  and  assessor,  and  that  he  was  worthy  of  the 
utmost  trust  and  confidence  was  indicated  by  the  fact  that  he  was  made  ad- 
ministrator of  many  estates.  He  died  in  1876  at  the  age  of  seventy-two  years, 
while  his  wife  passed  away  in  1893  at  the  age  of  eighty-five  years.  They 
were  both  members  of  the  old  Scotch  Presbyterian  church  and  afterward  became 
identified  with  the  United  Presbyterian  church.  Their  family  numbered  seven 
sons:  John,  living  at  Oak  Park,  near  Chicago;  James,  of  Erie  county,  Penn- 
sylvania; Robert,  who  is  assistant  postmaster  of  Decatur.  Illinois;  George,  who 
is  engaged  in  the  drug  business  at  New  Boston,  Mercer  county,  Illinois;  Henry, 
proprietor  of  a  grocery  at  Waterford,  Pennsylvania:  Charles  M.,  of  this  review; 
and  Frank,  who  died  when  about  eight  years  of  age. 

Charles  M.  Lytle  was  reared  in  Erie  county  and  attended  the  old  North- 
western Academy  there  but  when  fifteen  years  of  age  started  out  in  life  on  his 
own  account  and  has  since  been  dependent  upon  his  own  resources.  He  began 
clerking  in  a  dry-goods  and  clothing  store  and  followed  that  pursuit  until  1880, 
when  he  came  to  Illinois  and  accepted  a  position  as  traveling  salesman  for  the 
Decatur  Furniture  Company.  Later  he  entered  the  office  of  the  Decatur  Cof- 
fin Company  and  had  charge  of  the  office  for  twenty  years.  His  ability  in  that 
direction  led  to  his  selection  for  his  present  position.  He  came  to  Sterling  in 
July,  1905,  to  accept  the  position  of  manager  of  the  Rock  Falls  Manufacturing 
Company,  makers  of  coffins,  hearses  and  all  undertakers'  supplies.  This  is  a 
very  important  and  responsible  position,  employment  being  furnished  to  eigh- 
ty-five people,  and  their  goods  are  sold  all  over  the  country.  The  company  . 
won  a  silver  medal  on  its  exhibit  at  the  Louisiana  Purchase  Exposition  at  St. 
Louis  in  1904. 


686  HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY 

On  the  25th  of  May,  1876.  Mr.  Lytle  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss 
Mary  Frances  Thomas,  a  daughter  of  W.  W.  and  Mary  (Small)  Thomas. 
They  have  one  daughter,  Hortense,  now  the  wife  of  C.  G.  Heiby,  a  resident  of 
Decatur,  and  the  mother  of  one  child,  Frances  Jane  Heiby.  Mrs.  Lytle  is  a 
member  of  the  Presbyterian  church. 

Mr.  Lytle  gives  his  political  allegiance  to  the  republican  party,  being  in- 
flexible in  his  support  of  its  principles.  He  belongs  to  Macon  Lodge,  No.  8, 
A.  F.  &  A.  M.,  and  is  prominent  in  the  Odd  Fellows  society,  holding  member- 
ship in  Celestial  Lodge,  No.  186,  I.  0.  0.  F.  He  served  as  the  grand  patriarch 
in  the  Grand  Encampment  of  the  state  of  Illinois  in  1900  and  1901,  and  was  a 
delegate  to  the  sovereign  grand  sessions  of  1901  and  1902.  He  was  also  the 
first  secretary  of  the  Odd  Fellows  Old  Folks'  Home  at  Mattoon,  Illinois,  and 
at  present  occupies  the  position  of  brigade  commander  of  the  Second  Brigade 
of  the  Patriarchs  Militant.  He  is  most  highly  esteemed  by  his  brethren  of 
that  fraternity,  while  in  business  circles  he  has  made  for  himself  a  creditable 
name  by  his  unfaltering  devotion  to  every  duty  entrusted  to  him,  combined 
with  marked  ability  as  a  successful  manager. 


ARTHUR  H.  HARMS,  M.  D. 

Dr.  Arthur  H.  Harms,  engaged  in  the  practice  of  medicine  and  surgery 
with  office  in  the  Academy  of  Music  at  Sterling,  is  one  of  the  native  sons  of 
Illinois,  his  birth  having  occurred  in  Dixon  on  the  22nd  of  December,  1880. 
His  parents  were  Anton  W.  and  Mary  S.  (Ahrens)  Harms,  natives  of  Dixon, 
Illinois,  and  of  Oldenburg,  Germany,  respectively.  The  paternal  grandfather, 
Anton  W.  Harms,  was  born  on  the  island  of  Heligoland,  north  of  Germany, 
and  made  farming  his  life  work.  Emigrating  to  America  in  1837,  he  located  at 
Buffalo.  New  York,  and  afterward  removed  westward  to  Galena,  Illinois.  At  a 
later  date  he  took  up  his  abode  at  Dixon  and  there  purchased  the  interests  of 
Harris  and  Mason,  who  had  come  from  the  south  to  establish  a  plantation. 
Upon  that  place  he  spent  his  remaining  days  and  the  stone  house  which  he 
there  built  is  still  standing,  one  of  the  landmarks  of  the  community.  He  was 
eighty-nine  years  of  age  at  the  time  of  his  demise,  and  his  wife,  Mrs.  Anna 
(Hector)  Harms,  was  about  eighty-six  years  of  age  at  the  time  of  her  death. 
They  were  the  parents  of  five  children  and  by  a  former  marriage  the  father 
also  had  five  children. 

Aaron  Ahrens,  the  maternal  grandfather  of  Mr.  Harms,  was  born  at 
Oldenburg.  Germany,  and  about  1855  came  to  the  United  States.  He  after- 
ward returned  to  his  native  country,  where  he  lived  for  several  years  and  in 
1868  again  made  his  way  to  the  new  world,  settling  on  the  present  site  of 
Clinton,  Iowa.  His  next  removal  brought  him  to  Sterling,  where  he  still 
resides  at  the  venerable  age  of  eighty-four  years.  His  wife,  Mrs.  Gertrude 
(Soecker)  Ahrens,  died  a  number  of  years  ago  at  the  age  of  about  sixty-seven. 
In  their  family  were  three  sons  and  one  daughter,  including  Mary  S.  Ahrens, 
who  became  the  wife  of  Anton  W.  Harms.  Mr.  Harms  throughout  his  active 


HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY  •     687 

business  life  followed  the  occupation  of  farming  and  for  many  years  lived  in 
Palmyra  township,  but  in  1905  took  up  his  abode  in  Dixon,  where  he  is  now 
retired,  enjoying  in  well  earned  rest  the  fruits  of  his  former  labor.  He  has  a 
good  income  property  in  his  home  farm  of  one  hundred  and  sixty  acres.  Both 
he  and  his  wife  are  members  of  the  Lutheran  church.  In  their  family  are 
three  children:  Arthur  H.,  of  this  review;  Herbert  W.  and  Jessie  B.,  both  of 
Dixon. 

Dr.  Harms,  whose  name  introduces  this  record,  was  reared  upon  the  old 
homestead  farm  in  Palmyra  township,  early  becoming  familiar  with  the 
duties  and  labors  that  fall  to  the  lot  of  the  agriculturist.  He  attended  the 
district  schools  and  the  North  Dixon  high  school,  from  which  he  was  gradu- 
ated in  1894.  He  afterward  spent  about  two  years  in  Steinman  Institute  at 
Dixon  prior  to  entering  the  University  of  Chicago,  where  he  pursued  a  combi- 
nation course,  devoting  a  part  of  his  time  to  scientific  branches  and  the  re- 
mainder to  the  study  of  medicine.  He  further  continued  his  professional  edu- 
cation in  Eush  Medical  College  and  in  1904  located  for  practice  in  Sterling, 
where  he  has  since  remained.  He  is  thoroughly  conversant  with  the  most 
modern  methods  of  the  profession  and  is  continually  promoting  his  efficiency 
by  study  and  research.  He  is  now  health  officer  of  the  city  and  he  belongs  to 
the  Sterling  and  Rock  Falls  Physicians'  Club,  the  County  and  State  Medical 
Societies  and  the  American  Medical  Association. 

Pleasantly  situated  in  his  home  life,  Dr.  Harms  was  married  on  the 
29th  of  May,  1906,  to  Miss  Alice  Ward,  a  daughter  of  Judge  Henry  C.  and 
Mary  (Anthony)  Ward.  They  now  have  a  little  son,  H.  Ward  Harms.  Dr. 
Harms  and  his  wife  are  members  of  the  Presbyterian  church  and  he  belongs 
to  Rock  River  Lodge,  No.  612,  A.  F.  &  A.  M.  Politically  he  is  a  republican. 
In  hid  chosen  life  work  he  is  making  continued  advancement,  his  patronage 
steadily  growing  as  he  gives  proof  of  his  ability  to  cope  with  the  complex  prob- 
lems that  continually  confront  the  physician. 


WILLIAM  J.  BURLEIGH. 

William  J.  Burleigh,  manager  of  the  Novelty  Iron  Works,  to  which  re- 
sponsible position  he  has  worked  his  way  upward  by  his  close  application, 
unfaltering  fidelity  and  biisiness  capacity,  was  born  in  Boston,  Massachusetts, 
October  15,  1867.  His  parents,  Jedathan  and  Elizabeth  (Stockwell)  Bur- 
leigh, were  both  natives  of* New  England,  the  former  born  in  New  Hampshire 
and  the  latter  in  Massachusetts.  The  paternal  grandfather,  also  a  native  of 
the  old  Granite  state,  was  of  English  descent.  The  maternal  grandfather, 
born  in  Massachusetts,  likewise  ca.me  of  English  ancestry.  Jedathan  Bur- 
leigh was  a  pattern-maker  and  followed  that  business  in  Boston  and  other 
eastern  cities.  He  died  December  3,  1870,  at  the  age  of  thirty-three  years, 
and  since  1883  his  widow  has  been  a  resident  of  Sterling.  They  had  but 
two  children,  the  daughter  being  Lizzie,  the  wife  of  John  Cline  of  this  city. 

The  son,  William  J.  Burleigh,  spent  the  first  seven  years  of  his  life  in 
his  native  city,  and  then  went  with  his  parents  to  Northampton,  Massachu- 


688  HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY 

setts,  where  he  attended  the  public  schools,  acquiring  a  good  English  educa- 
tion. When  his  school  life  was  ended  he  accepted  a  clerkship  in  a  book 
store,  remaining  in  the  east  until  1883,  when  he  came  with  his  mother  to 
Sterling.  Here  he  accepted  a  clerkship  in  a  grocery  store,  where  he  continued 
for  a  short  time,  when  he  began  learning  his  pattern-making  trade,  which 
he  followed  for  several  years.  On  the  expiration  of  that  period  he -accepted 
the  position  of  shipping  clerk  in  the  Novelty  Iron  Works,  and  in  May,  1903, 
was  promoted  to  manager  of  the  company.  The  product  of  the  factory  in- 
cludes furnace  registers  and  cold  air  faces,  iron  hitching  posts,  automatic  stock 
fountains,  porcelain  lined  cylinders  for  wood  and  iron  pumps,  iron  trimmings 
for  wood  pumps,  plumbers'  supplies  and  gray  iron  castings  of  all  kinds. 
Employment  is  furnished  to  about  fifty  people,  and  the  goods  are  sold  in 
all  parts  of  the  country.  Mr.  Burleigh's  previous  experience  and  training 
in  the  business  world  well  qualify  him  for  his  present  position,  which  he 
is  now  creditably  filling.  The  Novelty  Iron  Works  is  one  of  the  oldest  manu- 
facturing concerns  in  the  city,  and  has  been  successful  from  the  beginning, 
enjoying  a  constantly  increasing  business. 

On  the  26th  of  February,  1889,  Mr.  Burleigh  was  married  to  Miss  Jessie 
Alexander,  a  daughter  of  Edward  and  Ada  (Hale)  Alexander.  There  are 
two  children  of  this  marriage,  Russell  A.  and  Edith.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Burleigh 
are  faithful  members  of  the  Congregational  church,  and  are  well  known  so- 
cially in  the  city.  Mr.  Burleigh  has  attained  high  rank  in  Masonry,  belong- 
ing to  Rock  River  Lodge,  No.  612,  A.  F.  &  A.  M. ;  Sterling  Chapter,  No.  57, 
R.  A.  M. ;  Sterling  Commandery,  No.  57,  K.  T. ;  and  is  also  a  thirty-second 
degree  Scottish  Rite  Mason  and  a  Noble  of  Tebala  Temple  of  the  Mystic 
Shrine.  He  likewise  holds  membership  relations  with  the  Modern  Woodmen 
of  America,  and  he  gives  his  political  support  to  the  republican  party.  With- 
out special  advantages  at  the  outset  of  his  career,  he  has  made  good  use  of 
his  opportunities  and  through  the  sterling  worth  of  his  character,  combined 
with  his  skill  in  business,  he  has  worked  his  way  upward  until  he  is  now 
one  of  the  leading  representatives  of  industrial  interests  in  Sterling. 


CHARLES  A.  DAVIS. 

Charles  A.  Davis,  conducting"  a  successful  commercial  enterprise  as  a 
dealer  in  hardware,  stoves  and  furnaces,  at  No.  32  West  Third  street,  in 
Sterling,  claims  Pennsylvania  as  the  state  of  his  nativity,  his  birth  having 
occurred  in  New  Holland,  Lancaster  county,  May  13,  1854.  His  parents 
were  Gabriel  and  Susanna  R.  (Diller)  Davis,  likewise  natives  of  the  Key- 
stone state,  and  that  the  family  wns  established  there  at  an  early  day  is  indi- 
cated by  the  fact  that  Archibald  Douglas  Davis,  the  grandfather  of  our  sub- 
ject, was  also  there  born.  He  was  of  Welsh  lineage,  devoted  his  life  during 
his  business  career  to  merchandising  and  died  in  early  manhood,  being  sur- 
vived by  his  wife,  Julianna  Barton  (Anderson)  Davis.  The  maternal  grand- 
father was  Jonathan  Diller,  also  a  native  of  Pennsylvania,  and  of  German 


HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY  689 

lineage.  He  wedded  Ann  Weaver  and  died  when  past  middle  life,  while  his 
widow  lived  to  be  nearly  eighty  years  of  age.  They  were  the  parents  of  six 
children,  five  of  whom  reached  years  of  maturity. 

Gabriel  Davis  became  a  merchant  in  the  east,  residing  in  Pennsylvania 
until  1856,  when  he  removed  westward  to  Sterling.  Here  he  lived  retired, 
enjoying  a  well  earned  rest  until  his  death,  which  occurred  January  26,  1880, 
at  the  age  of  seventy-six  years.  His  wife  survived  him  until  October  23, 
1907,  and  had  reached  the  very  advanced  age  of  ninety-three  years  when 
she  passed  away.  They  were  both  members  of  the  Protestant  Episcopal 
church,  but  in  her  later  life  Mrs.  Davis  became  a  member  of  the  Presbyterian 
church.  Mr.  Davis  served  as  senior  warden  in  his  church  and  was  deeply 
interested  in  all  that  pertained  to  the  welfare  and  upbuilding  of  the  com- 
munity and  to  the  promotion  of  its  material,  social,  intellectual  and  moral 
interests.  He  served  as  one  of  the  directors  of  the  public  schools  of  Ster- 
ling and  was  one  of  the  founders  of  the  Wallace  school.  Unto  him  and  his 
wife  were  born  seven  children,  six  eons  and  one  daughter,  of  whom  six  are 
now  living:  William  W. ;  Julianna  B. ;  Gabriel  H. ;  Isaac  Newton,  deceased; 
E.  Diller;  Henry  L. ;  and  Charles  A. 

The  last  named  was  reared  in  Sterling,  having  been  brought  to  the 
middle  west  by  his  parents  when  but  two  years  of  age.  He  attended  the 
public  schools  here,  and  when  he  entered  business  life  he  took  his  initial 
step  as  a  clerk  in  a  hardware  store.  He  thus  continued  for  eight  years,  during 
which  time  he  became  thoroughly  acquainted  with  the  business,  and  since 
1882  he  has  conducted  a  hardware  store  on  bis  own  account,  carrying  a 
full  line  of  shelf  and  heavy  hardware,  stoves  and  furnaces.  He  has  put 
forth-  earnest  effort  to  please  his  patrons,  and  his  straightforward  business 
methods  and  unwearied  industry  constitute  the  basis  of  his  success.  In  1894 
he  built  his  present  business  block  at  the  corner  of  West  Third  street  and 
Avenue  A.  It  is  a  brick  structure,  two  stories  and  basement,  and  is  one  of  the 
substantial  business  houses  of  the  city. 

In  September,  1894,  occurred  the  marriage  of  Charles  A.  Davis  and  Mrs. 
Rebecca  J.  Mack,  the  widow  of  George  Mack,  and  a  daughter  of  William 
Wilkinson.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Davis  belong  to  the  Presbyterian  church  and  the 
hospitality  of  the  best  homes  of  the  city  is  freely  accorded  them,  while  the 
warm  greetings  extended  in  their  own  home  makes  it  a  favorite  resort  with 
their  many  friends. 

The  name  of  Charles  A.  Davis  is  on  the  membership  rolls  of  Rock  River 
Lodge,  No.  612,  A.  F.  &  A.  M. ;  Sterling  Lodge,  No.  174,  I.  0.  0.  F. ;  and  the 
Knights  of  the  Globe.  He  is  a  stalwart  republican,  and  is  chairman  of  the 
Whiteside  county  central  committee,  of  which  he  has  been  a  member  for 
several  years.  He  served  for  several  terms  as  supervisor  and  has  been  urged 
by  his  fellow  townsmen  to  become  a  candidate  for  the  legislature.  From  its 
organization  he  has  been  a  member  of  the  Sterling  Club,  and  he  is  interested 
in  everything  that  pertains  to  the  welfare  and  progress  of  the  city.  He  was 
one  of  the  executive  committee  of  six  men  who  planned  the  fine  demonstra- 
tion in  celebration  of  the  opening  of  the  feeder  to  the  Hennepin  canal,  on 
the  24th  of  October,  1907.  He  has  been  a  resident  of  this  city  for  more  than 


690  HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY 

half  a  century,  and  is  one  of  its  best  known  and  most  honored  men,  active  in 
all  that  pertains  to  its  public  life  and  its  commercial  interests.  His  life  has 
been  actuated  by  high  principles  and  honorable  purposes,  and  the  sterling 
qualities  of  his  manhood  have  made  the  circle  of  his  friends  almost  co-exten- 
sive with  the  circle  of  his  acquaintances. 


MARTIN  BROTHERS. 

The  firm  of  Martin  Brothers — David  L.  and  John  W. — is  well  known  in 
Sterling  as  dealers  in  real  estate  and  as  representative  business  men  of  marked 
energy  and  enterprise.  They  stand  today  as  a  splendid  type  of  the  American 
citizen  who  recognizes  that  there  is  no  royal  road  to  wealth,  but  that  industry, 
intelligently  applied,  will  bring  success.  Starting  out  in  life  empty-handed, 
they  have  achieved  a  measure  of  prosperity  that  is  indeed  creditable,  and  at 
no  time  has  their  business  career  ever  presented  a  narrow  phase.  On  the  con- 
trary, their  methods  are  such  as  will  bear  close  investigation  and  scrutiny, 
and  their  labors  have  been  of  the  utmost  benefit  to  the  city  in  its  substantial 
upbuilding  and  adornment. 

Noting  something  of  the  family  history  of  the  Martin  Brothers,  it  is 
found  that  their  paternal  grandfather,  David  Martin,  was  a  native  of  Penn- 
sylvania and  of  German  descent.  He  followed  the  occupation  of  farming, 
living  in  Martinsburg,  Blair  county,  Pennsylvania,  where  he  died  when 
more  than  eighty  years  of  age.  His  wife  in  her  maidenhood  was  Miss  Long, 
and  she,  too,  was  about  eighty  years  of  age  when  called  to  her  final  rest.  They 
had  a  large  family  of  four  sons  and  ten  daughters,  including  John  Martin, 
our  subjects'  father,  who  was  a  native  of  Pennsylvania.  He,  too,  carried  on 
general  agricultural  pursuits,  and  in  1857  came  to  Illinois,  settling  at  Ster- 
ling, where  he  lived  retired,  save  for  the  supervision  which  he  gave  to  his 
invested  interests.  He  owned  a  number  of  farms  and  displayed  remarkable 
sagacity  and  enterprise  in  the  purchase  and  sale  of  farm  property.  In  early 
manhood  he  wedded  Catharine  Hoover,  also  a  native  of  the  Keystone  state 
and  a  daughter  of  Samuel  Hoover,  likewise  born  in  Pennsylvania  but  of 
German  descent.  Samuel  Hoover  was  a  farmer  by  occupation  and  in  1855 
removed  westward  to  Illinois,  establishing  his  home  in  Sterling.  Soon  after- 
ward he  began  making  investments  in  land  in  this  part  of  the  state  and 
became  the  owner  of  several  good  tracts,  together  with  some  city  property. 
He  died  here  in  1859  at  the  age  of  sixty-six  years.  His  wife  was  Mrs.  Eliza- 
beth (Sprecher)  Hoover.  In  her  family  were  five  sons  and  five  daughters, 
including  Catharine  Hoover,  who  gave  her  hand  in  marriage  to  John  Martin. 
She  died  in  July,  1863,  at  the  age  of  forty-three  years  and  six  months,  pass- 
ing away  in  the  faith  of  the  Methodist  church.  John  Martin,  who  was  a 
Lutheran  in  religious  belief,  survived  his  wife  until  May  16,  1896,  dying  at 
the  age  of  eighty-two  years,  one  month  and  twenty-nine  days.  Unto  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  John  Martin  were  born  seven  children,  five  sons  and  two  daughters,  four 
of  whom  are  now  living,  the  other  three  having  died  in  infancy :  Joseph  S., 


LlBHAHt 

(tt   IHfc 

OF  ILLINOIS 


HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY  693 

Jennie,  David  L.  and  John  W.  The  daughter  Jennie  is  the  wife  of  W.  M. 
Dillon. 

David  L.  Martin,  the  senior  partner  of  the  firm  of  Martin  Brothers,  was 
born  near  Martinsburg,  Pennsylvania,  in  Blair  county,  September  12,  1849, 
and  was  about  eight  years  of  age  when  he  came  to  Illinois  with  his  parents. 
Here  he  was  reared  to  manhood  and  has  since  lived  in  Sterling.  He  attended 
the  public  schools  and  afterward  pursued  a  commercial  course  in  Eastman's 
Business  College.  Returning  to  Sterling,  he  began  work  for  John  H.  Snavely 
in  the  furniture  business  and  was  in  his  employ  at  different  intervals  for  a 
number  of  years.  Later  he  engaged  in  the  sewing  machine  business  on  his 
own  account,  and  about  1897  formed  a  partnership  with  his  brother  John 
for  the  conduct  of  a  real-estate  business,  since  which  time  they  have  engaged 
in  buying  and  selling  property. 

John  W.  Martin  was  born  in  Sterling,  April  26,  1859,  and  has  spent  his 
entire  life  here.  He  attended  the  public  schools  until  his  fifteenth  year,  and 
at  the  age  of  seventeen  he  began  buying  cattle,  following  that  business  for 
some  time.  Later  he  was  in  partnership  with  S.  F.  Gleason  and  they  con- 
tinued together  for  several  years,  after  which  Mr.  Martin  joined  his  brother 
in  the  real  estate  business.  They  have  'been  very  successful  and  now  own 
about  two  thousand  acres  of  land  in  the  vicinity  of  Sterling  and  about  one 
hundred  and  twenty  acres  in  the  city,  which  has  been  platted  into  town  lots, 
besides  other  lots  in  all  parts  of  Sterling.  They  also  have  about  three  thou- 
sand acres  in  western  states.  They  buy  and  sell  outright  and  are  conducting 
an  extensive  and  profitable  real-estate  business.  They  have  purchased  consid- 
erable old  property,  have  remodeled  business  blocks  and  transformed  them 
into  attractive  modern  buildings.  They  have  laid  out  several  additions  to  the 
city,  which  they  have  improved  in  keeping  with  twentieth  century  ideas  of 
city  development,  laying  sidewalks,  planting  trees  and  doing  other  work 
which  contributes  to  the  substantial  upbuilding  and  beautifying  of  the  place. 
In  connection  with  what  they  have  done  in  Sterling  they  have  laid  out  an 
addition  in  Rock  Falls.  They  have  the  confidence  and  high  esteem  of  the 
citizens  of  Sterling,  and  are  well  known  over  the  country.  Their  word  is 
good  wherever  they  are  known,  for  in  all  business  dealings  they  have  been 
thoroughly  reliable  and  straightforward.  Moreover,  they  are  energetic  men, 
carrying  forward  well-defined  plans  to  successful  execution. 

The  Martin  brothers  take  a  great  interest  in  the  welfare  of  the  city  of 
Sterling,  and  have  spent  much  money  in  assisting  to  beautify,  improve  and 
upbuild  it.  Their  public-spirited  devotion  finds  tangible  evidence  in  many 
public  improvements  and  in  stock  which  they  own  in  various  business  enter- 
-prises.  Movements  which  are  projected  for  the  welfare  of  the  city  receive 
their  endorsement  and  cooperation,  and  their  work  has  been  of  much  value. 
Their  contributions  have  been  most  generous  toward  different  public  enter- 
prises, and  their  opinions  prove  an  influential  factor  in  matters  of  moment 
to  Sterling.  They  have  gained  for  themselves  a  most  creditable  name  and 
place  in  the  business  world,  and  upon  realty  values  their  views  are  largely 
received  as  conclusive.  But  while  developing  prosperous  business,  they  have 
never  concentrated  their  energies  upon  individual  concerns  to  the  exclusion 


694  HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY 

of  outside  interests,  but  on  the  contrary  have  worked  toward  the  upbuilding 
of  a  greater  Sterling,  generously  supporting  all  that  tends  to  public  benefit. 
Without  invidious  distinction  they  may  be  classed  with  the  foremost  citizens 
of  Whiteside  county. 


HENRY  M.  DETWEILER. 

Henry  M.  Detweiler,  who  carries  on  general  farming  on  section  14, 
Jordan  township,  is  one  of  the  native  sons  of  Ohio,  his  birth  having  oc- 
curred in  that  .state  on  the  26th  of  October,  1835.  He  has,  therefore,  passed 
the  seventy-second  milestone  on  life's  journey,  and  his  has  been  an  active  and 
honorable  career,  in  which  unfaltering  diligence  has  been  followed  by  suc- 
cess. 

His  parents,  Joseph  and  Mary  (Myers)  Detweiler,  were  natives  of  Bucks 
county,  Pennsylvania.     Little  is  known  concerning  the  ancestral  history  of 
the  family  save  that  the  grandparents  of  Mr.  Detweiler,  in  both  the  paternal 
and  maternal  lines,  were  natives  of  the  Keystone  state,  and  the  maternal  grand- 
father bore  the  name  of  William  Myers.     It  was  in  1821  that  Joseph  Det- 
weiler removed  from  Pennsylvania  to  Ohio,  the  journey  being  made  with 
one  four-horse  team  and  one  two-horse  team,  and  on  reaching  his  destination 
he  unloaded  his  goods  under  a  big  oak  tree  in  the  deep  woods.    Shortly  after-  i 
ward  he  purchased  three  hundred  acres  of  timber  land,  which  he  at  once  began 
to  clear  and  cultivate.     Both  he  and  his  wife  died  in  Ohio,  where  they  had 
long  resided  as  worthy  and  respected  farming  people.     The  only  survivors 
of  their  family  of  nine  children  are  Henry  M.,  of  this  review;  and  Abraham,   ! 
who  is  now  residing  in  Maryland.     Those  deceased  are:     William,  wh6  died 
in  California;  Sarah,  who  married  Louis  Yoder  and  died  in  Ohio;  Samuel   j 
and  Mary,  who  both  died  in  that  state;  Joseph,  who  died  near  Freeport,  Illi- 
nois; Hannah,  who  married  Abraham  Blosser  and  died  in  Ohio;  and  Eli,  j 
who  also  died  in  the  Buckeye  state. 

Under  the  parental  roof  Henry  M.  Detweiler  spent  his  boyhood,  and 
lessons  of  industry  and  integrity  were  early  impressed  upon  his  mind.  He 
acquainted  himself  with  the  best  methods  of  carrying  on  the  farm  work,  and 
thus  brought  practical  experience  to  his  duties  when  he  began  farming  in  this 
county,  coming  here  from  Ohio  in  1860. 

As  a  companion  and  helpmate  for  life's  journey  Mr.  Detweiler  chose 
Miss  Magdalena  G.  Detweiler,  whose  parents  spent  their  entire  lives  in  Bucks 
county,  Pennsylvania.  She  was  also  born  in  the  Keystone  state,  and  on  the 
21st  of  December,  1861,  gave  her  hand  in  marriage  to  the  subject  of  this  re- 
view. Six  children  have  been  born  to  them,  all  of  whom  are  yet  living, 
namely:  William  D.,  who  is  the  owner  of  a  general  store  in  Penrose,  Illi- 
nois; Eliza  J.,  wife  of  Martin  Book,  a  farmer  of  Lee  county;  Amelia,  the  wife 
of  Es*on  Waite,  a  farmer  residing  in  Jordan  township,  Whiteside  county; 
Frank,  a  farmer  living  across  the  road  from  his  father;  Maggie,  the  wife  of 
T.  H.  LeFevre,  a  farmer  living  in  South  Dakota;  and  Uriah,  a  telegraph 
operator  at  Conrad,  Indiana, 


HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY  695 

When  Mr.  Detweiler  first  settled  in  Jordan  township,  in  1860,  he  be- 
came the  owner  of  one  hundred  and  sixty  acres  of  rich  land,  which  was, 
however,  but  slightly  improved  at  that  time.  Possessing  energy  and  ambi- 
tion, he  resolved  to  increase  his  holdings,  and  after  some  years  added  to  the 
original  purchase.  He  is  now  the  owner  of  three  hundred  and  forty-nine 
acres,  all  in  one  body  and  constituting  one  of  the  finest  farms  of  the  county. 
In  its  midst  stands  a  comfortable  and  commodious  residence,  together  with 
large,  barns  and  outbuildings,  and  everything  is  kept  in  a  state  of  good  re- 
pair. Fences  divide  the  farm  into  fields  of  convenient  size  and  the  latest 
improved  machinery  is  vised  in  carrying  on  the  work  of  the  fields.  He  also 
has  good  buildings  for  his  tenants  and  his  farm  is  one  of  the  model  proper- 
ties of  the  twentieth  century  in  Whiteside  county. 

Mr.  Detweiler  has  long  been  a  stanch  republican,  inflexible  in  his  sup- 
port of  the  principles  of  the  party.  Mr.  Detweiler  is  numbered  among  the 
most  respected  citizens  of  Jordan  township,  for  there  have  been  no  chapters  in 
his  life  history  that  are  not  worthy  of  respect  and  good  will.  He  has  en- 
deavored to  live  peaceably  with  his  fellowmen,  to  recognize  the  rights  and 
privileges  of  others,  and  as  the  years  have  passed  he  has  achieved  a  measure 
of  success  that  indicates  his  unfaltering  diligence  in  business  affairs. 


H.  A.  REYNOLDS. 

II.  A.  Reynolds  is  numbered  among  the  substantial  citizens  of  White- 
side  county,  owning  a  valuable  property  comprising  two  hundred  and  thirty- 
five  acres,  situated  on  sections  1  and  2,  Mount  Pleasant  township,  which  is 
now  being  operated  by  his  two  sons,  M.  W.  and  C.  F.  Reynolds.  Mr.  Rey- 
nolds was  born  in  Rutland  county,  Vermont,  January  14,  1836,  a  son  of 
Raymond  A.  and  Nancy  B.  (Wentworth)  Reynolds,  who,  in  1855,  removed 
from  the  east  to  this  state,  making  a  settlement  in  Kane  county,  where  they 
lived  for  two  years,  subsequent  to  which  time  they  settled  in  Whiteside 
county  on  the  farm  which  is  now  the  home  of  our  subject.  In  his  later 
years  the  father  retired  from  agricultural  life  and  removed  to  Unionville, 
where  his  death  occurred  in  1885,  when  he  had  reached  the  age  of  seventy- 
five  years,  while  his  wife  survived  for  about  two  years,  passing  away  in  1887 
at  about  the  same  age.  The  father  gave  his  political  support  to  the  demo- 
cratic party,  and  both  he  and  his  wife  were  consistent  members  of  the  Meth- 
odist Episcopal  church.  The  two  daughters  of  the  family  are  also  deceased. 
Mrs.  Clark  Fisk,  who  made  her  home  in  Whiteside  county  throughout  a  long 
period  had  a  son,  Hon.  Charles  J.  Fisk,  who  is  now  a  supreme  judge  of 
North  Dakota,  making  his  home  in  Grand  Forks.  The  other  daughter  was 
Mrs.  Almon  W.  Champlin,  whose  husband  was  formerly  identified  with  the 
agricultural  life  of  Mount  Pleasant  township,  but  now  resides  in  Clinton. 
Their  two  sons  are  prominent  horse  dealers  of  Clinton. 

H.  A.  Reynolds,  the  only  survivor  of  his  father's  family,  was  reared  in 
Vermont  and  there  acquired  his  education  in  the  village  schools.  He  also 


696  HISTORY    OF   WHITESIDE    COUNTY 

assisted  his  father  in  his  blacksmith  shop  during  the  period  of  his  youth,  but 
since  coming  to  Whiteside  county  has  always  been  connected  with  farming 
interests.  He  was  very  successful  in  his  undertakings,  and  although  his  place 
at  first  comprised  but  seventy-five  acres,  he  has  increased  its  boundaries  until 
he  now  owns  two  hundred  and  thirty-five  acres,  all  of  which  is  under  a  good 
state  of  cultivation  and  is  improved  with  modern  and  substantial  residence 
and  outbuildings.  He  is  now  practically  living  retired,  the  farm  being  con- 
ducted by  his  two  eons. 

Mr.  Reynolds  was  married  at  his  present  home  to  Miss  Mary  E.  Rey- 
nolds, the  wedding  ceremony  being  performed  on  the  1st  of  January,  1862. 
Mrs.  Reynolds  was  born  in  Pennsylvania,  a  daughter  of  Philip  and  Nancy 
(Fisk)  Reynolds,  who  settled  in  Whiteside  county  about  the  same  time  that 
the  parents  of  our  subject  located  here.  Unto  our  subject  and  his  wife  have 
been  born  three  children,  but  one  died  in  infancy,  the  surviving  members 
being :  Martin  W.,  who  wedded  Emily  C.  Hammer,  by  whom  he  has  a  daugh- 
ter, Edna  Mae,  and  who  makes  his  home  with  our  subject;  and  Charles  F., 
who  was  married  to  Miss  Lillie  A.  James,  who  died  about  four  years  ago, 
leaving  four  daughters,  Mabel,  Pauline,  Myrtle  and  Gladys.  For  his  second 
wife  Charles  F.  Reynolds  chose  Mrs.  Margaret  (Norrish)  Houghtaling. 

Mr.  Reynolds  gives  his  political  support  to  the  democratic  party  where  na- 
tional issues  are  involved,  but  at  local  elections  casts  an  independent  ballot.  In 
former  years  he  worked  industriously  and  energetically  and  his  efforts  were 
richly  rewarded,  so  that  now,  at  the  age  of  seventy-two  years,  he  is  enabled 
to  live  retired  in  his  pleasant  country  home,  surrounded  by  many  warm 
friends,  who  esteem  him  highly  for  his  genuine  personal  worth. 


BENJAMIN  FRANKLIN  HENDRICKS. 

Benjamin  Franklin  Hendricks,  of  Morrison,  serving  for  the  third  term 
as  county  superintendent  of  schools  of  Whiteside  county,  and  recognized 
as  one  of  the  able  educators  of  this  section  of  the  state,  is  a  native  of  Pennsyl- 
vania, his  birth  having  occurred  in  Lancaster  county  in  1851.  His  father, 
Ephraim  D.  Hendricks,  was  born  in  Montgomery  county,  Pennsylvania,  and 
was  of  Holland  Dutch  lineage.  In  early  life  he  learned  and  followed  the 
tailor's  trade,  and  after  his  removal  to  Illinois,  in  1851,  he  located  on  a  farm 
in  Sterling  township,  Whiteside  county,  where  he  carried  on  general  agri- 
cultural pursuits  until  1864.  In  that  year  he  went  to  southern  Illinois,  where 
he  spent  a  few  years  as  an  agriculturist,  and  afterward  again  located  in  Ster- 
ling township,  where  he  followed  farming  until  his  removal  to  Kansas. 
His  last  days  were  spent  in  that  state,  his  death  occurring  in  1904.  He  was 
an  energetic  farmer  and  in  all  of  his  business  dealings  was  straightforward 
and  reliable,  so  that  he  commanded  the  confidence  and  trust  of  his  fellow- 
men  to  an  unusual  degree.  He  held  membership  in  the  Reformed  Men- 
nonite  church.  Ephraim  Hendricks  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Mary 
Rosenberger,  who  was  of  German  lineage.  She,  too,  belonged  to  the  Re- 


HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY  697 

formed  Mennonite  church,  and  died  in  that  faith.  In  their  family  were  five 
children:  Allen  R.,  a  druggist  of  Sterling;  Benjamin  Franklin,  of  this  re- 
view; Jacob  R.,  who  passed  away  early  in  life;  John  R.,  who  is  a  musician 
residing  in  Smithville,  Arkansas;  and  Charles  R.,  an  agriculturist  living 
near  Cawker  City,  Kansas. 

Benjamin  F.  Hendricks  was  reared  in  the  usual  manner  of  farm  lads 
and  supplemented  his  early  education,  acquired  in  the  common  schools,  by 
study  in  the  Sterling  high  school.  He  began  teaching  in  1870,  when  a  young 
man  of  nineteen  years,  and  has  since  followed  that  profession  with  the  ex- 
ception of  one  year,  which  was  devoted  to  rest  and  recreation.  He  proved 
most  capable  in  his  work  in  the  schoolroom,  imparting  clearly,  concisely  and 
readily  to  others  the  knowledge  that  he  had  acquired,  and  in  1877  he  re- 
ceived a  state  certificate.  He  has  been  connected  with  the  schools  of  Sterling, 
Erie,  Rock  Falls  and  Savanna.  He  is  now  serving  for  the  fourth  term  as 
county  superintendent  of  schools,  having  first  been  elected  to  the  office  in 
1882  for  a  four  years'  term  and  re-elected  in  1886.  He  continued  in  the 
office  until  1889,  when  he  resigned  to  accept  the  superintendency  of  the 
schools  of  Savanna,  Illinois,  where  he  remained  for  eight  years,  the  educa- 
tional system  there  receiving  marked  impetus  by  reason  of  his  practical  and 
progressive  ideas  and  labors.  He  then  returned  to  Whiteside  county  and 
was  re-elected  county  superintendent  in  1902,  since  which  time  he  has  filled 
the  office.  He  is  alert  and  enterprising,  constantly  studying  out  new  methods 
for  the  benefit  of  the  schools  and  introducing  ideas,  the  practical  utility  of 
which  have  been  proven  in  the  excellent  results  that  have  followed. 

Professor  Hendricks  was  married  in  1876  to  Miss  Lillian  E.  Peck,  who 
was  born  in  Portage  county,  Ohio,  in  1854.  They  had  four  children:  Earl 
L.,  a  physician  of  Lanark,  Illinois,  who  is  married  and  has  one  child;  Clyde 
P.,  a  dentist  of  Kalkaska,  Michigan,  also  married;  Hazel  D.,  who  is  attend- 
ing Normal  school  at  DeKalb;  and  Paul  M.,  twin  brother  of  Hazel,  who  died 
when  but  two  years  of  age.  The  parents  are  members  of  the  Presbyterian 
church,  in  the  work  of  which  they  are  deeply  interested.  Fraternally  he  is 
connected  with  the  Odd  Fellows  and  the  Modern  Woodmen  of  America,  while 
his  political  allegiance  is  given  to  the  republican  party.  In  the  field  of  his 
chosen  profession  he  has  made  constant  progress  and  has  gained  a  place  of 
distinctive  prominence  as  an  educator  of  this  part  of  the  state. 


WILLIAM  II.  SHAW. 

William  H.  Shaw,  a  farm  hand  in  his  early  youth,  is  now  conducting 
a  successful  business  in  grain  and  coal  in  Lyndon,  where  he  owns  and  oper- 
ates a  large  elevator.  He  was  born  in  Tioga  county,  New  York,  August  21, 
1850,  but  ihe  following  year  was  brought  to  Lyndon  township,  Whiteside 
county,  with  his  parents,  Henry  B.  and  Rosina  W.  (Newton)  Shaw.  His 
paternal  grandparents  were  William  and  Betsy  (Talmage)  Shaw,  natives  of 
Saratoga  county,  New  York,  where  their  entire  lives  were  passed.  The 


698  HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY 

mother  was  an  own  cousin  of  l)r.  DeWitt  Talmage,  the  noted  divine,  and 
was  a  daughter  of  Enos  Talmage,  who  served  for  seven  years  in  the  patriot 
army  in  the  Revolutionary  war.  William  Shaw  had  a  brother  who  was 
judge  of  the  circuit  court  of  Saratoga  county,  and  he  was  the  third  in  a 
family  of  four  sons.  The  eldest  brother,  Thomas  Shaw,  had  a  family  of 
twelve  sons  and  one  daughter.  The  second  brother,  Robert  Shaw,  became  a 
resident  of  New  Jersey,  and  the  youngest  was  William  Shaw,  grandfather  of 
.our  subject.  All,  however,  are  now  deceased.  Unto  Mr.  and  Mrs.  William 
Shaw  were  born  five  children:  Lucy,  deceased;  Elizabeth;  William  T.,  who 
has  also  passed  away ;  Henry  B. ;  and  Mary,  deceased. 

Henry  B.  Shaw  was  born  in  Tioga  county,  New  York,  November  12, 
1826,  and  resided  in  his  native  county  until  1850,  when  he  came  to  the  middle 
west  and  has  since  resided  in  Whiteside  county.  He  was  reared  on  a  farm 
and  after  coming  to  Illinois  purchased  and  secured  land.  His  father  had 
been  a  carpenter  by  trade,  and  Henry  Shaw  learned  that  business  under  his 
direction,  but  following  his  removal  to  the  west,  he  turned  his  attention  to 
agricultural  pursuits  and  purchased  one  hundred  and  sixty  acres  of  land  at 
the  bend  in  Lyndon  township.  This  he  improved,  but  after  a  time  sold  eighty 
acres,  and  later  disposed  of  the  remaining  eighty  acres.  He  then  again  en- 
gaged in  carpentering.  He  brought  some  money  with  him  on  his  removal 
from  New  York,  but  lost  most  of  his  property  through  the  illness  of  his  wife, 
which  brought  on  heavy  expenses.  He  then  took  up  his  trade  and  was 
identified  with  building  operations  in  the  county  until  he  enlisted  for  service 
in  the  Civil  war,  on  the  14th  of  August,  1862,  becoming  a  member  of  Com- 
pany B,  Seventy-fifth  Illinois  Volunteer  Infantry.  He  then  took  part  in 
the  battles  of  Perryville,  Stone  River,  Chickamauga,  Mission  Ridge  and  Look- 
out Mountain.  Later  he  was  transferred  to  the  First  United  States  Engineer 
Corps  and  saw  no  more  fighting,  but  did  equally  valiant  service  for  his  coun- 
try during  the  succeeding  eighteen  months.  After  being  with  the  engineers 
for  about  two  weeks  he  was  commissioned  artificer  and  continued  in  that  posi- 
tion until  the  close  of  the  war,  being  honorably  discharged  July  3,  1865. 

When  the  country  no  longer  needed  his  aid  at  the  front  Henry  B.  Shaw 
returned  home  and  worked  at  his  trade  as  long  as  he  was  able,  being  a  well 
known  representative  of  building  operations  in  Lyndon  and  the'  surrounding 
districts.  His  early  political  support  was  given  to  the  democracy,  but  on  the 
organization  of  the  republican  party  he  joined  its  ranks,  and  has  since  sup- 
ported the  candidates  at  the  head  of  its  ticket  with  two  exceptions,  when  he 
voted  the  greenback  ticket.  He  is  a  valued  member  of  Orson  K.  Hubbard 
Post,  No.  749,  G.  A.  R.  of  Lyndon,  and  is  a  member  of  the  Methodist  Epis- 
copal church.  His  life  has  been  characterized  by  industry  and  activity,  and  in 
all  things  he  has  been  guided  by  honorable  principles.  He  was  married  on  the 
7th  of  February,  1846,  to  Miss  Rosiria  W.  Newton,  who  was  born  in  Chenango 
county,  New  York,  February  29,  1828,  a  daughter  of  Moses  and  Mehitable 
(Burlingame)  Newton,  whose  family  numbered  twelve  children,  all  of  whom 
were  professional  people  with  the  exception  of  Mrs.  Shaw.  Mr.  Shaw  came  i 
to  this  county  in  1850,  and  his  wife  joined  him  in  1851.  Thus  far  more  than 
a  half  century  they  have  resided  in  the  county  and  have  witnessed  the  greater  • 


HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY  699 

part  of  its  development.  They  have  lived  together  longer  than  any  married 
couple  in  Whiteside  county,  having  traveled  life's  journey  as  man  and  wife 
for  sixty-three  years.  Their  family  numbered  five  children:  Sophia,  now 
the  wife  of  J.  F.  Brumbley,  of  Lyndon;  William  H.,  of  this  review;  Ida  A., 
the  wife  of  Jesse  Troop,  of  Sterling;  Clair  V".,  who  is  living  in  Hume  town- 
ship; and  Lily,  deceased. 

William  H.  Shaw,  whose  name  introduces  this  record,  spent  the  days  of 
his  boyhood  and  youth  in  his  parents'  home,  and  from  an  early  age  has  been 
dependent  entirely  upon  his  own  resources.  When  but  a  boy  he  began  earn- 
ing his  own  living  by  working  as  a  farm  hand,  his  father  being  away  from 
home  as  a  soldier  in  the  Civil  war.  William  H.  Shaw  continued  his  labors 
in  the  fields  in  the  employ  of  others  for  six  years,  but  was  ambitious  to  en- 
gage in  farming  on  his  own  account  arid,  carefully  saving  his  earnings,  at 
length  purchased  one  hundred  and  seventy  acres  of  land  on  sections  17,  19 
and  20,  Lyndon  township.  With  characteristic  energy  he  began  to  cultivate 
and  improve  the  fields,  which  he  brought  to  a  high  state  of  fertility,  so  that 
he  annually  marketed  good  harvests.  In  1890,  however,  he  retired  from  the 
farm  and  took  up  his  abode  in  Lyndon,  where  he  established  his  present  busi- 
ness as  a  dealer  in  grain  and  coal.  The  new  enterprise  proved  profitable,  and 
in  1902  he  built  a  large  elevator  with  a  capacity  of  twelve  thousand  bushels. 
In  addition  to  his  elevator  property,  he  owns  several  houses  and  lots  and  a 
business  building  in  Lyndon,  which  stand  as  monuments  to  his  ability  and 
enterprise  and  are  tangible  proof  of  his  unwearied  diligence. 

In  his  political  views  Mr.  Shaw  is  a  stalwart  republican,  and  his  fellow 
townsmen  have  called  him  to  a  number  of  positions  of  public  honor  and 
trust.  He  has  been  school  treasurer  for  the  past  fifteen  years,  and  was  as- 
sessor of  his  township  for  one  term.  Interested  in  the  moral  development 
of  his  community,  he  is  an  active  and  faithful  member  of  the  Congregational 
church,  in  which  he  is  serving  as  deacon.  His  fraternal  relations  are  with 
the  Masonic  lodge.  No.  750,  of  which  he  is  a  past  master,  the  Modern 
Woodmen  of  America  and  the  Mystics.  Almost  his  entire  life  has  been 
passed  in  this  county,  and  the  fact  that  many  of  his  stanchest  friends  are 
those  who  have  known  him  from  his  boyhood  to  the  present  is  an  indication 
that  his  has  been  an  honorable  career,  well  meriting  the  confidence  and  es- 
teem of  those  with  whom  he  has  been  brought  in  contact. 


M.  H.  GLEASON. 

M.  H.  Gleason,  who  is  well  known  as  a  raiser  of  full  blooded  Hereford 
cattle  and  as  a  successful  general  agriculturist,  who  now  owns  and  cultivates 
two  hundred  and  forty  acres  of  land  on  sections  25  and  36,  Montmorency 
township,  is  one  of  the  worthy  citizens  that  the  Emerald  isle  has  furnished  to 
Whiteside  county.  His  birth  occurred  in  Ireland  on  the  24th  of  March, 
1867,  and  after  spending  the  first  thirteen  years  of  his  life  in  his  native 
country  he  came  to  America  with  his  mother  in  1880.  They  had  heard  fa- 


700  HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY 

vorable  reports  concerning  the  opportunities  here  offered  and,  attracted 
thereby,  sailed  for  the  United  States,  becoming  residents  of  Whiteside  county. 
The  father  and  one  sister  died  in  Ireland.  The  mother's  death  occurred  in 
1907.  In  the  family  are  seven  living  children :  T.  P.,  who  is  now  in  South 
Africa;  John,  a  resident  of  Sterling;  .1.  P.,  who  is  living  in  Seattle,  Wash- 
ington; M.  H.,  of  this  review;  Mary,  the  wife  of  James  Rourk,  of  Sterling; 
"W.  H.,  also  living  in  Sterling;  and  Catherine,  the  wife  of  John  Daley,  whose 
home  is  in  Freeport,  Illinois.  One  daughter,  Nora,  is  deceased. 

M.  H.  Gleason  remained  at  home  with  his  mother  until  age  proclaimed 
him  a  man  grown,  with  all  the  responsibilities  and  duties  of  citizenship.  He 
then  started  out  in  life  for  himself,  and  the  occupation  to  which  he  was 
reared  he  determined  to  make  his  work.  He  rented  a  farm  for  five  years, 
and  during  that  time  carefully  saved  his  earnings  until  he  felt  justified  in 
making  purchase  of  two  hundred  and  forty  acres  of  'land  on  sections  25  and 
36,  Montmorency  township.  He  at  once  began  its  further  development  and 
improvement,  and  now  has  a  fine  farm,  well  equipped  with  good  buildings 
and  all  modern  machinery  for  facilitating  the  work  of  the  fields.  He  like- 
wise makes  a  specialty  of  raising  full  blooded  Hereford  cattle,  owning  some 
of  the  best  blooded  cattle  to  be  found  in  the  county. 

Pleasantly  situated  in  his  home  life,  Mr.  Gleason  was  married,  in  1896, 
to  Miss  Anna  M.  Miller,  and  unto  them  were  born  seven  children:  Mary 
Irene,  Clarence  J.,  Edward,  F.  Lester,  Walter  L.,  John  C.  and  Howard  H. 
The  parents  are  members  of  the  Catholic  church.  Mr.  Gleason  has  served 
as  school  director  for  ten  years,  and  believes  in  providing  good  educational 
privileges  to  equip  the  young  for  life's  practical  and  responsible  duties.  He 
also  filled  the  office  of  justice  of  the  peace,  and  his  decisions  were  strictly  fair 
and  impartial.  He  is  not  allied  with  any  political  party,  supporting  men  and 
measures  rather  than  a  political  organization,  and  standing  stanchly  in  de- 
fense of  whatever  he  believes  to  be  for  the  public  welfare. 


GEORGE  W.  CHAMBERLAIN. 

George  W.  Chamberlain  was  the  eldest  of  four  children,  the  others  being 
farmer  and  stock-raiser  of  Lyndon  township,  passed  away  on  the  3d  of  May, 
1900.  He  was  born  in  Monterey,  Steuben  county,  ,New  York,  January  30, 
1835,  a  son  of  Jason  and  Mary  (Goodrich)  Chamberlain,  who  were  natives 
of  Worcester  county,  Massachusetts,  their  early  life  being  spent  in  Petersham. 
Reared  and  married  in  that  state,  they  afterward  went  to  New  York  and  in 
1857  the  father  arrived  in  Whiteside  county,  Illinois,  the  mother  having 
died  in  the  Empire  state.  Mr.  Chamberlain  was  married  a  second  time  and 
carried  on  general  agricultural  pursuits  until  his  death  in  1880. 

George  W.  Chamberlain  was  the  eldest  of  four  children,  the  others  being 
Mrs.  Mary  Cole,  a  resident  of  Osage,  Iowa ;  Sylvester,  who  is  living  at  Amboy, 
Illinois;  and  Lucy  Loring,  deceased.  Until  twenty-one  years  of  age  George 
W.  Chamberlain  remained  in  the  Empire  state  and  then  came  alone  to  the 
middle  west  in  1856,  being  joined  the  following  year  by  _  his  parents.  He 


GEORGE    W  .  CHAMBERLAIN 


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HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY  703 

settled  first  in  Hopkins  township,  where  he  resided  until  1884,  identified 
with  the  agricultural  interests  of  this  .part  of  the  state.  In  that  year  he  went 
to  South  Dakota  with  his  family  and  settled  in  McPherson  county,  where 
he  owned  and  controlled  extensive  farming  interests,  spending  twelve  years 
in  the  northwest.  In  1896  he  returned  to  this  county  and  took  up  his  abode 
in  Lyndon  township,  where  he  continued  to  reside  until  his  life's  labors  were 
ended  in  death,  on  the  4th  of  May,  1900.  He  left  an  estate  there  of  three 
hundred  acres,  the  farm  lying  on  sections  13  and  14,  Lyndon  township. 
While  carrying  on  his  farm  he  made  a  study  of  the  feeding  and  raising  of 
cattle  and  horses  and  his  business  interests  were  carefully  and  successfully 
managed. 

At  the  time  of  the  Civil  war  Mr.  Chamberlain,  his  sympathies  thor- 
oughly aroused  in  behalf  of  the  Union,  enlisted  in  August,  1861,  as  a  mem- 
ber of  Company  A,  Thirty-third  Illinois  Volunteer  Infantry.  He  took  part 
in  fourteen  important  battles  and  also  the  siege  of  Vicksburg.  He  was  never 
wounded  nor  in  the  hospital,  but  was  always  found  at  his  post  of  duty,  taking 
part  in  long,  hard  marches  as  well  as  in  battles,  or  serving  his  turn  on  the 
lonely  picket  line.  He  continued  at  the  front  for  several  months  after  the 
cessation  of  hostilities,  being  mustered  out  in  December,  1865.  He  after- 
ward became  a  member  of  the  Grand  Army  Post  in  South  Dakota  and  thus 
maintained  pleasant  relations  with  his  old  army  comrades.  While  living 
in  that  section  of  the  country  he  was  also  an  active  factor  in  political  circles. 
From  the  time  when  age  conferred  upon  him  the  right  of  franchise  he  gave 
unfaltering  allegiance  to  the  republican  party,  and  while  in  the  northwest 
served  as  president  of  the  board  of  supervisors  of  McPherson  county,  filled 
other  positions  and  was  frequently  chosen  as  a  delegate  to  the  party  conven- 
tions. No  trust  reposed  in  him  was  ever  betrayed  in  the  slightest  degree. 
On  the  contrary  he  was  as  loyal  in  citizenship  as  when  he  followed  the  old 
flag  on  southern  battlefields  and  was  equally  faithful  to 'the  obligations  which 
devolved  upon  him. 

It  was  not  long  after  his  return  from  the  war  that  Mr.  Chamberlain  was 
married  in  1867  to  Miss  Olive  Roe,  who  was  born  in  Sharon  township,  Rich- 
land  county,  Ohio,  June  22,  1841,  and  in  1864  came  with  her  parents  to 
Whiteside  county,  the  family  home  being  established  in  Lyndon  township. 
Mrs.  Chamberlain  is  a  daughter  of  Thomas  and  Curcurence  (Orton)  Cham- 
berlain, the  former  a  native  of  Richland  county,  Ohio,  and  the  latter  of 
Monroe  county,  New  York.  They  were  married  in  the  Buckeye  state  and 
from  1864  continued  residents  of  Whiteside  county  until  called  to  their 
final  rest,  the  father  at  the  age  of  seventy-three  years,  the  mother  at  the  age 
of  sixty-seven.  She  was  of  Connecticut  parentage,  while  Mr.  Roe's  people 
came  from  Orange  county,  New  York.  His  grandfather,  Thomas  Roe,  was  a 
soldier  of  the  American  army  in  the  Revolutionary  war  and,  being  cap- 
tured, was  sent  as  a  prisoner  to  England,  where  he  remained  for  a  year.  His 
son  Thomas  served  in  the  war  of  1'812  under  General  William  Henry  Harri- 
son. Unto  Thomas  and  Curcurence  Roe  were  born  four  children :  Mrs. 
Chamberlain:  Margaret  Jane,  the  wife  of  Henry  Wilser,  of  Lyndon  town- 


704  HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY 

ship;  Oliver  O.,  a  resident  of  Dayton,  Washington;  and  Joseph,  who  is  living 
in  Topeka,  Kansas. 

The  home  of  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Chamberlain  was  blessed  with  a  daughter 
and  two  sons.  The  elder  son,  George  Howard,  born  in  Lyndon  township,  in 
1872,  is  living  on  the  old  homestead  and  Orton  Jason  is  also  in  the  same 
township.  The  daughter,  Lilly  Mary,  died  at  the  age  of  two  years.  The 
death  of  the  husband  and  father  occurred  May  3,  1900,  and  the  county 
thereby  lost  a  valued  citizen,  one  who  in  a  substantial  measure  contributed 
to  the  agricultural  development  of  his  part  of  the  county.  He  belonged  to 
that  class  of  men  who  owe  their  advancement  and  success  to  their  own 
efforts  and  as  the  architect  of  his  own  fortunes  he  builded  wiselv  and  well. 


WILLIAM  P.  BENSON. 

Among  the  enterprises  which  have  gained  for  Sterling  industrial  and 
commercial  prominence  is  that  conducted  under  the  name  of  the  National 
Manufacturing  Company,  and  as  president  of  this  company  William  P.  Ben- 
son is  widely  and  favorably  known.  He  was  born  in  Chicago,  March  27, 
1869,  and  is  of  Swedish  descent,  his  ancestors  having  lived  in  Sweden  for 
many  generations.  His  paternal  grandfather  spent  his  entire  life  there, 
reaching  the  age  of  about  seventy  years.  His  son.  John  Benson,  was  born 
in  Sweden,  and  followed  the  occupation  of  farming  in  that  country.  At- 
tracted by  the  excellent  business  opportunities  of  the  new  world,  he  bade 
adieu  to  friends  and  native  country  and  sailed  for  the  United  States  in  1866, 
his  destination  being  Chicago.  In  that  city  he  followed  the  cabinet-making 
trade  for  a  time,  but  is  now  a  purchasing  agent.  In  1870  he  removed  to 
Sterling,  where  he  resided  for  twenty-one  years,  or  until  1891,  when  he  re- 
turned to  the  metropolis  by  the  lake,  and  is  still  living  there.  Both  he  and  his 
wife  are  members  of  the  Congregational  church.  Their  family  numbered 
four  children,  a  son  and  three  daughters,  but  Anna,  the  second  daughter,  is 
now  deceased.  The  others  are:  William  P.,  of  this  review;  and  Ida  C.  and 
Alma,  both  of  Chicago. 

In  taking  up  the  personal  history  of  William  P.  Benson  we  present  to 
our  readers  the  life  record  of  one  who  is  widely  and  favorably  known  here, 
for  he  was  only  about  a  year  old  when  brought  by  his  parents  to  Sterling. 
When  he  had  attained  the  usual  age  he  entered  the  public  schools,  therein 
pursuing  his  studies  for  seven  years.  At  the  early  age  of  thirteen,  however, 
he  started  out  in  life  on  his  own  account,  and  whatever  success  he  has  since 
achieved  or  enjoyed  is  attributable  entirely  to  his  own  labors.  He  began 
work  in  the  factory  of  the  Novelty  Manufacturing  Company,  and  his  trust- 
worthiness and  capability  led  to  his  retention  in  that  service  until  he  was 
nineteen  years  of  age.  He  completed  his  education  in  the  night  school. 

At  the  age  of  nineteen  Mr.  Benson  entered  the  employ  of  Lawrence 
Brothers  as  bookkeeper,  continuing  with  them  in  the  office  and  also  as  trav- 
eling salesman,  from  1889  until  1901.  He  then  resigned  his  position  and 
organized  the  National  Manufacturing  Company  for  the  purpose  of  manu- 
facturing builders'  hardware.  That  the  enterprise  has  proved  prosperous  and 


HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY  705 

has  become  one  of  the  foremost  industrial  interests  of  Sterling  is  indicated 
by  the  fact  that  they  now  employ  ninety  workmen.  They  have  recently 
erected  a  new  factory  building,  their  first  building  having  been  a  two-story 
structure,  fifty  by  seventy  feet.  Later  they  put  up  additions  thereto,  and  in 
1907  they  erected  a  fine  brick  factory,  one  hundred  by  one  shundred  and 
seven  feet  and  three  stories  in  height,  with  a  boiler  and  engine  room,  forty- 
six  by  twenty-six  feet.  This  is  in  a  separate  one-story  building.  Their  office 
building  adjoins  the  factory  on  the  corner  of  Wallace  street  and  First  avenue. 
They  sell  their  goods  in  all  parts  of  the  United  States  and  Canada,  and  that 
the  output  finds  favor  with  the  public  is  indicated  by  the  large  trade  they 
now  receive.  The  officers  of  the  company  are:  W.  P.  Benson,  president;  L. 
A.  Bittorf,  secretary;  and  H.  V.  Bittorf,  vice-president  and  treasurer.  All 
are  men  of  good  business  ability  and  commercial  enterprise,  and  their  well 
directed  labors  have  resulted  in  most  gratifying  success. 

In  1900  Mr.  Benson  erected  an  attractive  residence  at  No.  1007  Penning- 
ton  avenue,  where  he  and  his  family  now  reside.  He  was  married  on  the 
12th  of  October,  1893,  to  Miss  Alice  W.  Manning,  a  daughter  of  Adam  V. 
and  Elizabeth  (Hutchison)  Manning.  Thev  have  two  sons,  Merrill  M.  and 
Keith  W. 

The  parents  are  members  of  the  Congregational  church,  active  and  help- 
ful in  its  work,  and  Mr.  Benson  is  a  member  of  its  prudential  committee. 
Interested  in  all  that  tends  to  elevate  mankind  and  promote  the  moral  pro- 
gress of  the  race,  he  is  connected  with  the  Young  Men's  Christian  Association, 
of  which  he  is  now  serving  as  a  director.  He  is  likewise  a  director  of  the 
Galt-Brookfield  Hospital,  and  a  spirit  of  benevolence  is  indicated  in  his  rela- 
tions with  Rock  River  Lodge,  No.  612,  A.  F.  &  A.  M. ;  Sterling  Chapter,  No. 
57,  R.  A.  M. ;  and  Sterling  Commandery,  No.  57,  K.  T.  His  political  en- 
dorsement is  given  the  republican  party.  In  business  life  Mr.  Benson  has 
won  the  somewhat  hackneyed  but  altogether  expressive  title  of  a  self-made 
man,  for  from  early  youth  he  has  depended  upon  his  own  resources,  his 
energy  and  perseverance  overcoming  obstacles  and  competition  until  he  is 
now  at  the  head  of  an  important  and  profitable  industrial  enterprise  of 
Sterling. 


NATHAN  COLE  WARNER. 

Nathan  Cole  Warner,  a  well  known  and  valued  resident  of  Prophetstown, 
was  born  in  this  village  January  22,  1856,  and  has  always  resided  here.  He 
was  named  after  Nathan  Cole,  a  millionaire  ex-mayor  of  St.  Louis,  and  a 
warm  personal  friend  of  his  father.  A.  J.  Warner,  the  grandfather,  was  a 
native  of  Springfield,  Massachusetts,  born  in  1787,  and  in  1806  he  removed 
to  Missouri,  which  only  three  years  before  had  been  purchased  from  the 
French  and  was  still  largely  inhabited  by  French  settlers.  Jabez  Warner 
took  up  his  abode  near  St.  Louis,  and  during  his  residence  there  was  promi- 
nent in  public  affairs,  serving  as  probate  judge  and  a  sheriff  of  St.  Louis 


706  HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY 

county.  Having  in  early  life  learned  the  cooper's  trade  he  established  and 
successfully  conducted  an  extensive  cooperage  business  in  St.  Louis,  making 
flour  barrels  for  the  mills  of  that  city.  When  the  news  of  the  victory  of 
the  Americans  over  the  British  at  New  Orleans,  on  the  8th  of  January,  1815, 
reached  St.  Louis,  Mr.  Warner  lost  his  right  arm  while  assisting  in  firing  a 
salute  in  celebration  of  the  triumph.  He  was  lieutenant  during  the  second 
war  with  England,  and  with  his  company  made  a  trip  up  the  Mississippi 
river  to  keep  the  Indians  in  subjection.  During  this  expedition  the  captain 
of  the  company  was  wounded  and  soon  afterward  died,  leaving  the  troops  in 
command  of  Lieutenant  Warner.  In  his  home  county,  where  he  was  widely 
known,  Jabez  Warner  was  regarded  as  a  man  of  clear  judgment,  of  un- 
swerving integrity  and  great  kindness  of  heart,  qualities  which  won  him  high 
and  uniform  esteem.  In  1811  he  married  Elizabeth  Conner,  who  was  born 
in  Clarkston,  South  Carolina,  in  1794.  He  died  in  1847  and  was  long  sur- 
vived by  his  wife.  Their  children  were:  John  H. ;  Mary  E.,  the  wife  of 
Job  Dodge;  Elias  Burchard;  Andrew  J. ;  Sarah  C.,  the  wife  of  Silas  Sears; 
Edward  B. ;  Eliza  A.,  the  wife  of  Andrew  J.  Tuller;  Morton  P.;  and  Ellen  M., 
the  wife  of  B.  H.  Bacon. 

Andrew  Jackson  Warner,  the  father  of  our  subject,  came  to  this  county 
at  the  age  of  fourteen  years,  in  1837,  making  the  journey  with  his  father, 
Jabez  Warner,  on  a  flat  boat.  He  always  remained  in  this  district  and  be- 
came prominent  in  community  affairs.  He  was  engaged  in  merchandising 
with  Andrew  J.  Ford  from  1849  until  1851,  and  for  several  years  was  part 
owner  of  a  plow  factory  and  sawmill  in  Prophetstown.  In  1862  he  was 
appointed  assistant  United  States  revenue  assessor,  and  in  1865  was  promoted 
to  the  office  of  revenue  assessor  for  the  third  congressional  district,  retaining 
the  position  until  1873.  He  also  filled  various  township  offices,  and  for  sev- 
eral terms  was  president  of  the  board  of  trustees  of  Prophetstown.  His  po- 
litical allegiance  was  given  to  the  republican  party,  and  he  was  one  of  the 
stalwart  workers  in  its  ranks.  Aside  from  his  commercial  interests,  he  was 
one  of  the  original  promoters  of  the  First  National  Bank  of  Prophetstown, 
and  became  one  of  its  directors.  He  likewise  engaged  in  loaning  money,  and 
was  an  extensive  property  owner  here  up  to  the  time  of  his  death,  which  oc- 
curred when  he  was  seventy-two  years  of  age.  In  early  manhood  he  married 
Elvira  Rowe,  who  died  at  the  age  of  thirty-five  years,  and  the  father  after- 
ward married  Mrs.  Eliza  M.  Woodard,  the  widow  of  Oscar  Woodard.  Of  the 
five  children  of  his  first  marriage,  two  died  in  infancy,  the  others  being: 
Florence,  the  deceased  wife  of  Dr.  Mosher;  Nathan  Cole;  and  George  E.,  a 
prosperous  farmer  living  west  of  Prophetstown.  By  the  second  marriage  there 
were  two  children:  Charles  J.,  who  is  conducting  the  Citizens'  Bank  in 
Prophetstown ;  and  Agnes  E.,  the  wife  of  A.  S.  Greene,  a  hardware  merchant 
of  Prophetstown. 

Nathan  Cole  Warner  entered  the  public  schools  at  the  usual  age,  and 
pursued  his  studies  to  the  age  of  twenty,  when  he  entered  upon  his  business 
career,  accepting  a  position  as  clerk  in  the  First  National  Bank.  He  thus 
served  for  about  two  years,  after  which  he  removed  to  his  farm  of  one  hun- 
dred and  sixty  acres  on  section  1.  Prophetstown  township.  There  he  made 


HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY  707 

his  home  for  eighteen  years,  carefully  conducting  the  place  and  bringing 
the  fields  under  a  high  state  of  cultivation.  He  still  retains  the  ownership  of 
this  farm,  but  in  the  fall  of  1899  again  took  up  his  residence'  in  the  town, 
where  he  began  dealing  in  poultry  and  ice.  He  has  built  up  an  extensive 
trade  in  this  connection  and  the  business  is  increasing,  year  by  year,  having 
from  the  first  proved  a  profitable  enterprise. 

In  1879  Mr.  Warner  was  married  to  Miss  II.  Euphemia  Dias,  a  native 
of  Indiana,  who  came  to  Illinois  with  her  parents  about  forty  years  ago. 
Her  father,  Edward  Dias,  died  of  typhoid  fever  about  two  weeks  after  his 
arrival  here,  leaving  the  children  to  the  care  of  his  widow.  Unto  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  Warner  have  been  born  a  son  and  daughter:  Harry  Jackson,  who  is  a 
graduate  of  the  Illinois  State  university,  and  is  now  assistant  chemist  in  the 
employ  of  the  government  at  Wiishington,  D.  C. ;  and  Florence,  who  is  also  a 
graduate  of  the  State  University,  and  is  now  assistant  librarian  at  the  State 
Agricultural  College  library  in  Manhattan.  Kansas. 

Mr.  Warner  is  now  a  commissioner  of  the  union  special  drainage  dis- 
trict, comprising  the  townships  of  Prophetstown,  Tampico  and  Hume,  and 
also  extending  into  Lee  county,  embracing  over  fifty  thousand  acres  in  the 
district.  He  was  re-elected  in  the  fall  of  1907  for  a  second  term  of  three 
years.  In  this  position  he  is  doing  much  to  drain  the  bad  lands  .of  the 
county  and  render  the  soil  fertile  and  productive.  His  political  allegiance 
has  always  been  given  to  the  republican  party,  and  he  has  never  faltered  in 
his  support  thereof,  for  he  believes  its  platform  contains  the  best  elements  of 
good  government.  He  represents  one  of  the  oldest  families  of  the  county, 
and  this  alone  would  entitle  him  to  mention  in  this  volume,  but  his  per- 
sonal characteristics  also  make  him  worthy  of  a  place  in  the  history  of  his 
community.  He  is  known  as  a  dependable  man  in  every  relation  and  in 
emergency.  He  is  eminently  a  man  of  business  sense,  who  easily  avoids  the 
mistakes  and  disasters  that  come  to  others,  and  while  a  man  of  well-balanced 
mind,  even  temper  and  conservative  habit,  he  is  never  lacking  in  that  enter- 
prise which  leads  to  the  accomplishment  of  its  purpose. 


WALTER  V.  PARKER. 

Walter  V.  Parker,  who  is  one  of  the  successful  stockmen  in  Whiteside 
county,  was  born  in  Garden  Plain  township,  April  19,  1856,  his  parents 
being  Truman  and  Emma  (James)  Parker,  who  came  to  this  county  in 
1836,  settling  in  Parker's  Grove,  in  the  southeast  portion  of  the  county,  on 
section  25.  The  death  of  the  father  occurred  April  11,  1887,  when  he  had 
attained  the  age  of  seventy-one  years,  while  his  wife  died  January  30,  1889, 
at  the  age  of  sixty-one  years.  Their  family  numbered  three  children:  Ella 
L.,  the  wife  of  Perry  A.  Willis,  of  Port  Byron,  Illinois;  Walter  V.,  of  this 
review;  and  Arthur  T.,  of  East  St.  Louis,  Illinois. 

Walter  V.  Parker  received  his  education  in  the  schools  of  his  home 
locality,  and  when  he  had  attained  his  majority  engaged  in  farming  on^hia 


708  HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY 

father's  land,  at  the  same  time  carrying  on  the  business  of  buying  and  ship- 
ping stock,  which  he  has  followed  with  gratifying  success  to  the  present  time. 
He  owns  two  well  improved  farms  in  Garden  Plain  township,  aggregating 
some  three  hundred  acres,  and  his  prosperity  has  come  to  him  entirely 
through  his  well  directed  labor  and  enterprise  since  starting  out  in  life  on 
his  own  account.  He  is  widely  recognized  as  one  of  the  most  successful 
stockmen  of  the  county,  and  as  a  citizen  who.se  business  methods  have  ever 
been  thoroughly  honorable,  straightforward  and  reliable. 

On  the  loth  of  January,  1884,  Mr.  Parker  was  united  in  marriage  to 
Miss  Emma  L.  Knapp,  a  daughter  of  C.  S.  and  Henrietta  (Armstrong) 
Knapp.  The  father  came  here  in  1848,  and  the  mother  in  1849,  being  one 
of  the  oldest  families  in  the  county.  The  father,  whose  birth  occurred  at 
Mooers,  Clinton  county,  JSTew  York,  January  4,  1824,  passed  away  in  Garden 
Plain,  Whiteside  county,  Illinois,  December  7,  1905,  at  the  age  of  eighty 
years  and  twenty-three  days.  His  wife  still  survives  and,  her  birth  having 
occurred  on  the  17th  of  March,  1828,  is  now  more  than  eighty  years  of  age. 
This  worthy  couple  were  the  parents  of  five  children,  namely:  Mrs.  Parker; 
Robert,  of  Sheridan,  Illinois;  Dr.  R.  G.  Knapp,  of  Chicago;  Charles  A.,  de- 
ceased; and  Nettie  L.,  at  home.  Unto  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Parker  have  been  born 
two  children :  Leslie  V.,  who  is  engaged  with  his  father  in  the  stock  busi- 
ness; and  E.  Clair,  who  is  attending  school. 

Mr.  Parker  gives  his  allegiance  to  the  republican  party,  but  has  not 
cared  to  take  more  than  a  citizen's  interest  in  the  work  of  the  organization, 
preferring  to  concentrate  his  energies  upon  his  business  affairs.  However, 
he  held  the  office  of  township  clerk  for  a  number  of  years,  discharging  his 
duties  with  promptness  and  capability.  Fraternally  he  has  been  identified 
with  the  Ancient  Order  of  United  Workmen  since  1882.  For  fifty-two  years, 
or  throughout  his  entire  life,  he  has  lived  in  Whiteside  county,  and  that 
many  of  his  stanchest  friends  are  numbered  among  those  who  have  known 
him  from  his  boyhood  to  the  present  time  is  indicative  of  the  fact  that  his 
has  been  an  honorable  and  upright  career. 

He  has  always  lived  on  the  home  farm — in  three  houses,  all  now  stand- 
ing within  three  hundred  feet  of  each  other.  He  has  never  been  away 
from  home  more  than  two  weeks  at  a  time,  giving  his  attention  uninterrupt- 
edly to  business. 


CLARE  GATES   HARRISON. 

The  welfare,  progress  and  upbuilding  of  every  community  depend  upon 
its  industrial  and  commercial  enterprises  and  the  men  who  control  these  in- 
terests. In  this  connection  Mr.  Harrison  is  well  known  as  the  founder  and 
promoter  of  the  Harrison  Manufacturing  Company,  and  though  yet  a  young 
man  he  has  made  a  creditable  and  enviable  record  in  business  circles. 

He  was  born  in  Sterling,  August  24,  1872.  and  is  a  son  of  William  N. 
and  Jennie  (Gates)  Harrison.  The  father  was  born  near  Corning,  New 


HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY  709 

York,  and  his  father,  a  resident  of  the  Empire  state,  lived  for  many  years 
on  his  farm  near  Corning,  or  until  he  passed  away  in  middle  life.  He  mar- 
ried a  Miss  Sands,  who  was  about  eighty-two  years  of  age  at  the  time  of  her 
demise.  They  were  the  parents  of  three  sons  and  two  daughters.  The  ma- 
ternal grandfather  was  William  Henry  Gates,  a  native  of  Vermont,  who  in 
early  life  followed  the  wagon-maker's  trade,  and  after  his  removal  to  the 
middle  west  carried  on  farming  near  Independence,  Iowa,  his  death  there 
occurring  when  he  was  about  eighty  years  of  age.  His  widow,  Mrs.  Maria 
(Hyde)  Gates,  is  still  living,  her  home  being  upon  the  old  farm  in  Iowa. 
They  had  five  sons  and  seven  daughters,  and  the  family  _  is  of  English 
lineage. 

William  N.  Harrison  was  reared  to  agricultural  pursuits  and  carried  on 
farming  until  after  the  outbreak  of  the  Civil  war,  when,  in  response  to  the 
country's  need,  he  enlisted  as  a  member  of  Company  H,  Tenth  New  York 
Cavalry,  with  which  he  served  for  more  than  three  years.  He  enlisted  as  a 
private,  but  was  mustered  out  as  quartermaster  sergeant.  He  took  part  in 
the  battles  of  Gettysburg,  Shiloh  and  a  number  of  other  important  engage- 
ments, and  on  one  occasion  was  captured  by  Confederate  troops,  after  which 
he  was  incarcerated  in  Libby  prison  for  several  months.  He  went  through 
all  the  hardships  and  horrors  of  war  and  proved  himself  a  valiant  and  loyal 
soldier.  When  hostilities  had  ceased  and  victory  perched  upon  the  Union 
banners,  he  went  to  Elmira,  New  York,  where  he  began  learning  the  car- 
penter's trade,  following  that  pursuit  until  his  death.  In  1868  he 
removed  westward  to  Illinois,  settling  first  at  Sterling,  but  soon  afterward 
going  to  Rock  Island  Junction.  He  was  there  employed  as  car  repairer  for 
the  old  Galena  Air  Line,  but  made  his  home  in  Sterling.  Two  years  later 
he  began  contracting  and  building  on  his  own  account  in  this  city,  and  was 
closely  identified  with  its  building  operations,  erecting  many  of  the  substan- 
tial structures  of  the  city.  He  died  March  10,  1903,  at  the  age  of  sixty-six 
years,  and  is  still  survived  by  his  wife,  who  is  a  native  of  Bradford,  Vermont. 
For  many  years  she  has  been  a  consistent  member  of  the  Congregational 
church.  Their  family  numbered  but  two  children,  the  younger  being  Dale 
Stuart  Harrison. 

Clare  G.  Harrison  was  reared  in  his  native  city  and  attended  the  public 
schools  and  business  college.  He  was  afterward  employed  for  a  year  and  a 
half  in  a  jewelry  store,  and  then  took  up  his  present  business,  contracting 
and  operating  a  planing  mill  under  the  name  of  the  Harrison  Manufactur- 
ing Company.  In  this  way  he  employs  from  fifteen  to  thirty  people  in  the 
conduct  of  what  is  one  of  the  old  established  business  enterprises  of  Sterling, 
with  which  Mr.  Harrison  has  been  connected  since  1897. 

Pleasantly  situated  in  his  home  life,  Mr.  Harrison  was  married  on  the 
10th  of  December,  1899,  to  Miss  Carrie  Kannaka,  a  daughter  of  Emanuel 
and  Fredericka  (Whalen)  Kannaka.  Her  parents  were  natives  of  Germany, 
her  father  being  a  young  man  of  about  twenty-one  years  when  he  came  to 
the  United  States,  while  her  mother  was  a  maiden  of  fourteen  years.  Mr. 
Kannaka  settled  near  Buffalo,  New  York,  and  throughout  his  business  life 
has  been  a  shoemaker.  Since  the  spring  of  1907,  however,  he  and  his  wife 


710  HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY 

have  resided  in  Sterling.  They  have  two  children,  the  son  being  Edward 
Kannaka,  who  is  now  in  the  employ  of  the  National  Manufacturing  Com- 
pany. The  father  was  twice  married,  and  by  his  first  union  had  three  daugh- 
ters and  one  son :  Marie,  Anna,  Ella  and  Louis. 

Mr.  Harrison  is  well  known  as  an  exemplary  representative  of  the  Ma- 
sonic fraternity.  He  belongs  to  Rock  River  Lodge,  No.  612,  A.  F.  &  A.  M. ; 
Sterling  Chapter,  No.  57,  R.  A.  M. ;  Sterling  Commandery,  No.  57,  K.  T. ;  and 
Oriental  Consistory  of  Chicago.  He  is  likewise  connected  with  Medinah 
Temple  of  the  Mystic  Shrine  in  the  latter, city.  His  wife  holds  membership 
in  the  Episcopal  church.  Politically  he  is  a  republican,  and  is  alderman  of 
the  Fourth  ward.  In  political  circles  he  is  locally  prominent,  and  his  devo- 
tion to  the  public  good  is  manifest  in  the  many  tangible  ways  in  which  he 
gives  support  to  progressive  movements  for  the  benefit  of  the  city. 


WASHINGTON  M.  DILLON. 

It  is  only  under  the  stimulus  of  opposition  and  the  pressure  of  ad- 
versity that  the  best  and  strongest  in  men  is  brought  out  and  developed. 
The  world  is  fast  coming  to  a  realization  of  the  fact  that  it  is  not  the  poor 
boy  but  the  son  of  wealthy  parents  who  is  deserving  of  pity.  Seldom  does 
the  latter  make  his  mark  in  the  world,  but  the  former,  when  buffetted  by 
fortune,  calls  forth  his  latent  energies  and  in  many  cases  comes  off  victor  in 
the  strife  for  name  and  fortune.  Such  has  been  the  career  of  Washington 
Moorehead  Dillon,  who  as  president  and  treasurer  of  the  Northwestern  Barb 
Wire  Company,  is  accounted  one  of  the  most  prominent  of  Sterling's  suc- 
cessful business  men. 

Born  in  Zanesville,  Ohio,  on  the  2d  of  July,  1842,  he  was  the  fourth 
in  order  of  birth  in  a  family  of  five  children,  whose  parents  were  Loyd  and 
Margaret  Annauche  (Culbertson)  Dillon.  The  great-grandfather,  Moses  Dil- 
lon, spent  his  entire  life  in  England.  The  paternal  grandfather,  John  Dil- 
lon, was  a  native  of  England  and  of  French  Huguenot  stock.  Emigrating 
to  America,  he  became  interested  in  the  shipping  business  between  Balti- 
more and  the  West  Indies  and  owned  a  number  of  vessels  which  were  de- 
stroyed by  the  French  privateers.  In  this  enterprise  he  was  in  partnership 
with  his  son  Loyd.  He  became  a  Friend  or  Quaker  in  religious  faith  and 
died  in  Zanesville,  Ohio,  at  an  advanced  age.  He  married  Miss  Edith  Hus- 
sey,  who  died  in  middle  life.  Her  ancestry  could  be  traced  back  in  the 
maternal  line  to  the  Griffiths,  the  last  king  of  Wales.  Unto  John  and  Edith 
(Hussey)  Dillon  were  born  a  large  family,  Loyd  being  their  eldest  child. 

Loyd  Dillon  was  born  in  Maryland  and  for  many  years  was  interested 
in  the  shipping  business  in  partnership  with  his  father.  After  their  vessels 
were  destroyed  by  the  French  privateers  they  removed  to  Zanesville,  Ohio, 
and  engaged  in  the  iron  business  at  Dillon's  Falls  on  the  Licking  river,  three 
miles  above  Zanesville.  The  business  was  there  conducted  successfully  for 
many  years,  but  the  father  died  in  1845  at  the  comparatively  early  age  of 


LIBRARY 

OF  TH£ 

WERSITY  OF  ILLINOIS 


HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY  713 

forty-two  years.  In  early  manhood  he  wedded  Margaret  Annauche  Cul- 
bertson,  a  daughter  of  William  Culbertson,  a  native  of  Chambersburg,  Penn- 
sylvania, who  followed  the  occupation  of  farming,  and  died  at  an  advanced 
age.  His  wife,  Mary  Sharpe,  passed  away  in  early  womanhood.  They  had 
two  children,  Mary  Jane  and  Margaret  Annauche.  The  latter  was  born  in 
Ohio  and  by  her  first  marriage  to  Loyd  Dillon  became  the  mother  of  two 
daughters  and  three  sons:  Ellen,  deceased;  Mary  Price,  the  deceased  wife 
of  Dr.  D.  H.  Law;  Loyd  Haynes,  who  lived  in  Sterling,  but  has  now  passed 
away;  Washington  M.,  of  this  review;  and  Moses  Dillon,  now  of  Boston, 
Massachusetts.  The  last  named  came  to  Sterling  many  years  ago  and  was 
prominently  connected  with  its  business  interests  as  a  dealer  in  groceries, 
lumber  and  coal  and  as  owner  of  an  elevator.  Here  he  resided  until  1905, 
since  which  time  he  has  made  his  home  in  Boston,  but  still  has  business 
interests  here,  being  proprietor  of  lumber  and  coal  yards  and  of  an  elevator, 
his  commercial  interests  at  this  point  being  managed  by  Frank  Grimes. 
After  losing  her  first  husband  Mrs.  Loyd  Dillon  became  the  wife  of  R.  P. 
Robinson,  and  to  them  was  born  a  son,  George  Mathiott  Robinson,  who  is 
now  president  of  the  Charters  Gas  Engine  Company  of  Sterling.  Mrs.  Rob- 
inson, who  was  a  consistent  member  of  the  Presbyterian  church  and  a  lady 
of  many  estimable  qualities,  died  June  2,  1881,  at  the  age  of  sixty-eight 
years,  while  Mr.  Robinson  passed  away  when  about  sixty  years  of  age.  He 
was  a  hardware  merchant  of  Zanesville,  Ohio,  and  afterward  of  Dixon,  Illi- 
nois, and  subsequently  engaged  in  the  agricultural  implement  business. 

Washington  M.  Dillon  lived  in  Ohio  until  1856,  covering  the  first  four- 
teen years  of  his  life,  and  during  that  time  attended  the  public  schools.  He 
afterward  worked  on  a  farm  for  his  uncle  at  Zaleski,  Ohio,  and  completed 
his  education  in  the  Ohio  University  at  Athens.  He  was  a  young  man  of 
twenty-two  years,  when,  in  1864,  he  responded  to  the  country's  call  for  aid, 
enlisting  as  a  member  of  Company  C,  One  Hundred  and  Forty-eighth  Ohio 
Volunteer*  Infantry  in  the  one  hundred  days'  service.  He  continued  at  the 
front  until  the  expiration  of  his  term  and  after  the  war  began  clerking  in 
the  banking  house  of  Culver,  Penn  &  Company,  at  Nos.  19  and  21  Nassau 
street,  New  York,  where  he  remained  for  several  years.  Removing  to  St. 
Louis,  Missouri,  he  was  there  engaged  in  the  newspaper  business  and  sub- 
sequently took  up  his  abode  at  Dixon,  Illinois,  where  he  clerked  in  a  dry- 
goods  store  for  a  few  months,  after  which  he  opened  a  grocery  and  queens- 
ware  business. 

Four  years  later  he  came  to  Sterling,  where  he  has  lived  since  1869. 
Here  he  entered  into  partnership  with  W.  C.  Robinson  in  the  ownership 
and  conduct  of  a  hardware  and  agricultural  implement  business,  which  they 
carried  on  for  nine  or  ten  years.  He  then  organized  the  Northwestern  Barb 
Wire  Company,  which  he  has  since  conducted  and  of  which  he  was  vice 
president  and  is  now  president  and  treasurer,  while  A.  H.  Dillon  is  secretary 
and  vice  president,  and  Paul  Washington  Dillon  superintendent.  The  com- 
pany manufactures  barb  wire,  fencing,  gates,  nails,  stretchers,  etc.  Their 
goods  are  sold  extensively  throughout  the  west  and  employment  is  furnished 
to  from  forty  to  fifty  people.  Their  factory  is  located  at  Rock  Falls,  is  built 


714  HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY 

of  stone  taken  from  the  bottom  of  Rock  river  and  is  three  stories  in  height, 
and  their  output  has  become  extensive,  this  proving  one  of  the  profitable  pro- 
ductive industries  of  the  county.  Mr.  Dillon  was  also  one  of  the  organizers 
and  president  of  the  Dillon-Griswold  Wire  Company,  which  was  formed  in 
1892.  He  is  still  largely  interested  in  this  concern,  which  is  on  the  Sterling 
side  of  the  Rock  river  and  which  has  employed  as  many  as  three  hundred 
men  at  a  time. 

On  the  8th  of  May,  1873,  occurred  the  marriage  of  Washington  M. 
Dillon  and  Miss  Sarah  J.  Martin,  a  daughter  of  John  and  Catherine 
(Hoover)  Martin.  There  are  four  children  of  that  union,  Mary  Catharine, 
Margaret  Annauche,  John  Martin  and  Paul  Washington.  The  elder  daugh- 
ter is  the  wife  of  Daniel  Pierce  Wild,  a  resident  of  Sycamore,  Illinois,  and 
they  have  three  daughters,  Margaret  Dillon,  Sarah  Pauline  and  Catharine 
Virginia.  The  elder  son  is  a  practicing  physician  of  Chicago,  while  the 
younger  son  is  superintendent  of  the  Northwestern  Wire  Works.  He  mar- 
ried Miss  Crete  Blackman  and  they  have  two  daughters,  Crete  Blackman  and 
Margaret  Jane.  The  son-in-law,  Daniel  Pierce  Wild,  is  connected  with  the 
financial  interest  of  Sycamore,  being  vice  president  of  the  Pierce  Trust  & 
Savings  Bank. 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  Dillon  are  devoted  members  of  the  Presbyterian  church 
and  Mr.  Dillon  belongs  to  Will  Robinson  Post,  G.  A.  R.  His  political  alle- 
giance is  given  to  the  republican  party,  but  he  has  neither  time  nor  inclina- 
tion for  office,  preferring  to  concentrate  his  energies  upon  his  extensive  busi- 
ness affairs.  His  beautiful  home,  known  as  Oaklawn,  embraces  six  acres  of 
ground,  in  the  midst  of  which  stands  a  fine  residence.  In  his  business  life  he 
has  been  watchful  of  opportunity  and  through  the  improvement  of  the  advan- 
tages that  have  come  to  him  he  has  gradually  advanced  to  a  prominent  place 
in  industrial  circles,  belonging  also  to  that  class  of  representative  business 
men  who,  while  promoting  individual  prosperity,  also  contribute  to  the  gen- 
eral welfare. 


FREDERICK  WOESSNER,  JR. 

Frederick  Woessner,  Jr.,  is  engaged  in  the  cultivation  of  a  farm  of  two 
hundred  and  thirty  acres  in  Genesee  township  belonging  to  his  father.  He 
is  a  wide-awake,  alert  and  energetic  young  business  man,  whom  Whiteside 
county  is  glad  to  number  among  her  native  sons.  He  was  born  on  the  old 
family  homestead  here  May  27,  1878,  and,  as  the  name  indicates,  is  of  German 
lineage.  His  parents,  Frederick  and  Christina  (Mutchler)  Woessner,  were 
both  natives  of  Germany,  and  in  early  life  came  to  the  United  States.  Al- 
though the  father  began  his  business  career  as  a  farm  hand,  he  is  now  the 
owner  of  two  fine  farm  properties  in  Jordan  and  Genesee  townships.  His  life 
has  been  one  of  unremitting  activity  and  well  directed  effort,  and  upon  these 
qualities  he  has  builded  the  success  which  now  makes  him  one  of  the  sub- 
stantial citizens  of  his  community.  Both  he  and  his  wife  are  yet  residents  of 
Jordan  township.  In  the  family  of  this  worthy  couple  were  ten  children, 


HISTORY    OF   WHITESIDE    COUNTY  715 

namely:  William,  of  Whiteside  county;  Frederick,  of  this  review;  Frank  and 
John,  both  deceased;  George,  likewise  of  this  county;  Kate,  the  wife  of 
John  Holacher,  of  Whiteside  county ;  Minnie,  who  became  the  wife  of 
Charles  Fanlker,  and  resides  in  this  county;  Lizzie,  at  home;  Emma,  who 
has  passed  away;  and  Anna,  also  at  home. 

Frederick  Woessner  attended  the  public  schools  in  early  youth  and  re- 
mained with  his  parents  until  he  attained  his  majority.  During  the  summer 
months  he  worked  in  the  fields  until  the  task  of  plowing,  planting  and  har- 
vesting became  familiar  to  him,  and  thus,  with  practical  experience,  he  en- 
tered upon  agricultural  pursuits  as  a  life  work  when,  on  attaining  his  ma- 
jority, he  started  in  business  on  his  own  account  by  renting  one  of  his 
father's  farms.  The  place  comprises  two  hundred  and  thirty  acres  of  rich 
and  productive  land  in  Genesee  township,  the  soil  responding  readily  to  the 
care  and  cultivation  which  he  bestows  upon  it,  the  early  spring  planting 
being  followed  by  the  golden  harvests  of  autumn. 

In  1900  Mr.  Woessner  was  married  to  Miss  Mary  Johnson,  a  native  of 
Whiteside  county,  whose  parents  are  residents  of  Sterling.  This  union  has 
been  blessed  with  four  children:  Olive  C.,  Eveline  A.,  Ada  M.  and  Euth  M. 
The  parents  are  members  of  the  German  Lutheran  church,  and  are  inter- 
ested in  the  church  work  and  other  movements  which  are  for  the  benefit  of 
mankind  or  the  promotion  of  the  interests  of  the  county.  Mr.  Woessner 
exercises  his  right  of  franchise  in  support  of  the  republican  party,  and  keeps 
well  informed  on  the  questions  of  the  day,  but  has  never  sought  or  desired 
office,  preferring  to  give  his  undivided  attention  to  his  business,  knowing  that 
close  and  unrelaxing  industry,  guided  by  sound  judgment,  will  eventually 
win  the  success  which  is  the  goal  of  his  hopes. 


ALLEN  N.  BRADFORD. 

Rock  Falls  is  pre-eminently  an  industrial  center,  and  is  brought  into 
close  contact  with  the  outside  world  through  its  trade  relations,  as  it  sends 
its  manufactured  products  into  various  parts  of  the  country.  Mr.  Bradford 
L?  a  well  known  representative  of  industrial  life  here,  as  manager  of  the 
Russell,  Burdsall  &  Ward  Bolt  &  Nut  Company,  in  which  connection  his 
expert  mechanical  ability  and  knowledge  are  brought  into  constant  play. 

He  was  born  in  Plymouth,  Massachusetts,  April  3,  1873,  being  the 
elder  of  two  children  of  Allen  and  Lydia  (Nye)  Bradford,  his  sister  being 
Lydia  Drew  Bradford.  He  is  a  direct  descendant  in  the  seventh  generation 
from  Governor  William  Bradford,  who  came  over  in  the  Mayflower  in  1620 
and  was  chosen  executive  head  of  the  Plymouth  colony.  His  grand- 
father, David  Bradford,  who  was  born  in  Plymouth,  Massachusetts,  April 
29,  1796,  died  July  22,  1860.  A  rolling  mill  and  nail  factory  at  Chilton- 
ville,  now  a  part  of  Plymouth,  began  operation  there  in  1827,  and  soon 
afterward  David  Bradford  became  superintendent  and  was  thus  closely  as- 
sociated with  the  industrial  interests  of  the  town.  He  was  the  inventor  of 


716  HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY 

a  nail  machine  of  considerable  merit,  and  was  widely  known  for  his  skill 
and  ability  in  his  chosen  field  of  labor.  Allen  Bradford,  father  of  our  sub- 
ject, was  born  in  Plymouth,  August  17,  1837,  and  departed  this  life  April 
26,  1876.  At  the  time  of  his  death  he  was  superintendent  of  the  tack  de- 
partment of  the  Cobb  &  Drews  factory.  His  widow  still  survives  him  and  is 
yet  a  resident  of  Plymouth.  Her  father,  Captain  Gorham  H.  Nye,  was  bom 
at  Nantucket,  Massachusetts,  April  25,  1803,  and  died  on  the  31st  of  October, 
1878  He  was  a  sea  captain  and  made  many  voyages  to  the  Sandwich  Islands 
and  was  a  trader  on  the  coast  of  Oregon.  At  the  time  that  gold  was  discov- 
ered in  California  in  1848,  he  was  in  that  state.  His  daughter,  Lydia  G.  Nye, 
was  born  in  Honolulu,  on  the  Sandwich  Islands,  January  30,  1844. 

Allen  N  Bradford,  reared  in  the  place  of  his  nativity,  entered  the  public 
schools  at  the  usual  age,  and  as  he  mastered  the  various  branches  of  learning 
passed  from  grade  to  grade  until  he  completed  the  high  school  course  by 
graduation  His  literary  training  completed,  he  entered  upon  his  business 
career  in  the  employ  of  Cobb  &  Drew,  manufacturers  of  rivets,  tacks  and 
nails  at  their  main 'factory  in  Plymouth.  In  1896  he  came  to  Rock  lalls 
and  took  charge  of  their  plant  there,  which  at  that  time  occupied  a  part  of 
the  Lawrence  Brothers'  building.  In  the  year  1901  the  company  erected  a 
wire  mill  on  land  leased  from  the  Chicago,  Burlington  &  Quincy  Railroad, 
for  drawing  their  own  wire,  and  in  1903  erected  a  large  plant  for  the  manu- 
facture of  rivete,  bolts  and  nuts,  which  contains  sixty  thousand  square 
of  floor  space,  being  in  part  two  stories  high,  and  the  remainder  three  ston, 
high  Employment  is  given  to  one  hundred  skilled  workmen.  The  firm 
of  Cobb  &  Drew  carried  on  business  until  1907,  when  they  sold  their  Rock 
Falls  plant  to  the  Russell,  Burdsall  &  Ward  Bolt  &  Nut  Company,  which  i 
the  style  of  the  present  firm.  The  product  of  this  plant  is  sold  throughout 
the  west  and  they  have  sales  offices  in  the  Commercial  National  Bank  build- 
ins  of  Chicago.  Mr.  Bradford,  because  of  his  practical  knowledge  of  the  busi 
ness  is  well  qualified  for  the  onerous  and  responsible  duties  which  devolve 
upon  him  as  manager  of  the  factory,  and  the  success  of  the  enterprise  is  due 
in  no  small  degree  to  his  well  directed  efforts. 

In  his  social  relations  Mr.  Bradford  is  a  Mason,  and  has  attained  high 
rank  in  the  order,  belonging  to  Rock  River  Lodge,  No.  612,  A.  F.  &  A  M.  J 
Sterling  Chapter,  No.  57,  R.  A.  M. ;  and  Sterling  Commandery,  No.  5  /  T 
He  is  also  a  valued  member  of  the  Sterling  Club  and  has  gamed  much  social 
popularity  during  his  residence  in  this  city. 


HARRY  ECKLES  BURKHOLDER. 

The  history  of  a  community  has  long  since  ceased  to  be  a  record  of  war 
and  conquest.  It  is  the  account  of  its  business  development  the  utilization 
of  its  natural  resources  and  the  establishment  of  those  institutions  which  in- 
dicate the  onward  march  of  civilization.  Now  associated  with  commercial 
activity  in  Sterling  is  Harry  Eckles  Burkholder,  one  of  the  native  sons  of 
the  city  who  is  successfully  dealing  in  farm  implements,  buggies  and  wagons. 


HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY  717 

He  was  born  on  the  5th  of  December,  1877,  being  one  of  the  seven  chil- 
dren of  Christian  and  Mary  (Irvine)  Burkholder,  natives  of  Lancaster  county, 
Pennsylvania,  and  of  Illinois,  respectively.  The  paternal  grandfather,  Elias 
Burkholder,  was  also  born  in  the  Keystone  state,  and  was  of  German  descent. 
In  early  life  he  followed  general  farming  in  Pennsylvania,  but  afterward 
engaged  in  buying  cattle  in  Whiteside  county  for  many  years,  becoming  one 
of  the  enterprising  and  leading  business  men  of  this  part  of  the  state.  He 
died  in  the  spring  of  1907  at  the  advanced  age  of  eighty-four  years,  and  thus 
passed  away  one  of  the  respected  and  worthy  residents  of  the  community.  His 
wife,  Mrs.  Maria  (Blair)  Burkholder,  still  survives. 

Their  family  of  four  children  included  Christian  Burkholder,  who  was 
brought  by  his  parents  to  Illinois  during  his  boyhood  days,  in  1859,  and 
settled  at  Sterling,  where  he  acquired  his  early  education,  continuing  his 
studies  at  Mount  Morris,  Illinois.  He  has  now  lived  in  Whiteside  county 
for  almost  a  half  century.  In  his  youth  he  worked  on  the  farm  with  his 
father,  and  early  became  inured  to  hard  labor,  such  as  falls  to  the  lot  of  the 
pioneer  in  the  development  of  farms  on  the  frontier.  He  afterward  accepted 
the  position  of  bookkeeper  with  H.  S.  Street  in  the  implement  business,  and 
eventually  became  Mr.  Street's  successor.  He  prospered  as  a  merchant  and 
.erected  a  large  brick  building,  where  he  has  now  conducted  business  for 
thirty  year?,  being  one  of  the  most  reliable  and  best  known  business  men  of 
the  city.  He  and  his  wife  are  members  of  the  Congregational  church.  He 
stands  for  progressive  citizenship  and  his  efforts  in  behalf  of  municipal  in- 
terests have  been  far-reaching  and  beneficial.  He  was  mayor  of  Sterling 
for  two  terms,  and  discharged  the  duties  of  the  office  in  a  prompt  and  busi- 
ness-like way  that  produced  results  favorable  to  the  best  interests  of  the  city. 
Prior  to  his  service  as  mayor  he  was  alderman  for  several  .terms,  and  for  a 
number  of  years  has  been  president  of  the  consolidated  school  board,  the 
cause  of  education  finding  in  him  a  stalwart  champion.  He  was  also  a 
member  of  the  republican  central  committee  for  several  years,  and  his  opin- 
ions have  carried  weight  in  the  councils  of  the  party. 

Christian  Burkholder  wedded  Mary  Irvine,  a  daughter  of  Joseph  Ir- 
vine, one  of  the  early  settlers  of  Illinois  and  a  farmer  who  for  many  years 
tilled  the  soil,  but  finally  retired  from  active  life  and  removed  to  Rockford, 
where  he  died  at  an  advanced  age,  having  long  survived  his  wife.  There 
were  three  children  of  the  first  marriage,  and  later  he  married  again,  having 
also  three  children  by  that  union.  Unto  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Burkholder  have  been 
born  four  sons  and  three  daughters,  of  whom  five  are  yet  living:  Charley, 
who  makes  his  home  in  Charlotte,  North  Carolina;  Charlotte,  the  wife  of 
Harvey  Keefer,  of  Sterling;  Homer  S.,  residing  in  Cedar  Rapids,  Iowa; 
Harry  E.,  a  twin  brother  of  Homer,  who  lives  in  Sterling;  and  Alice,  the  wife 
of  E.  B.  Scott,  of  West  Haven,  Connecticut. 

Harry  E.  Burkholder  was  reared  in  Sterling,  and  when  he  had  mastered 
the  branches  of  learning  taught  in  the  public  schools  he  prepared  specially 
for  the  practical  and  responsible  duties  of  business  life  by  a  course  in  a  com- 
mercial college  in  Quincy.  He  then  joined  his  father  in  business,  becoming 
familiar  with  the  implement  trade,  and  is  now  his  father's  successor.  For 


718  HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY 


five  years  he  traveled  upon  the  road  as  a  salesman,  and  is  now  controlling 
an  extensive  patronage  in  Sterling  in  farm  implements,  buggies  and  wagons. 
He  carries  the  output  of  standard  manufactories,  and  his  earnest  desire  to 
please  his  patrons,  combined  with  reliable  business  methods,  have  won  for  him 
desirable  success. 

On  the  12th  of  September,  1900,  Mr.  Burkholder  married  Miss  Frances 
Louise  Bowman,  a  daughter  of  Edward  and  Maria  (Adams)  Bowman,  who 
came  to  this  county  at  an  early  day  and  here  reared  their  family  of  five 
children.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Burkholder  are  members  of  the  Congregational 
church  and  are  prominent  socially,  the  hospitality  of  the  best  homes  of  the 
city  being  cordially  extended  them.  Mr.  Burkholder  votes  with  the  repub- 
lican party,  but  the  demands  of  growing  business  leave  him  little  time  for 
activity  in  public  affairs. 


C.  F.  RIBORDY. 

C.  F.  Ribordy,  who  has  devoted  his  entire  life  to  general  agricultural 
pursuits,  has  gained  a  prosperity  which  comes  as  the  direct  reward  of  earn- 
est, persistent  labor,  intelligently  applied.  A  valuable  property  of  four  hun- 
dred and  thirty-two  acres  now  pays  tribute  to  him,  and  he  also  derives  a  good 
income  from  his  stock-raising  interests.  His  life  record  began  in  LaSalle 
county,  Illinois,  on  the  14th  of  July,  1866,  his  parents  being  Ferdinand  and 
Louisa  (Pellouchoud)  Ribordy,  who  were  natives  of  Switzerland  and  came 
to  America  in  the  early  '40s.  They  settled  in  LaSalle  Icounty,  Illinois,  whero 
the  father  secured  land  from  the  government,  converting  this  raw  tract  into 
well  cultivated  fields.  There  he  carried  on  farming  until  the  time  of  the 
Civil  war,  when,  feeling  that  his  first  duty  was  to  his  adopted  country,  and 
being  imbued  with  the  liberty-loving  spirit  so  characteristic  of  the  Swiss  race, 
he  joined  the  army  as  a  member  of  the  Fifty-sixth  Illinois  Infantry  and 
served  for  three  years.  After  the  close  of  the  war,  in  which  he  did  his  full 
duty  as  a  soldier,  he  returned  to  LaSalle  county,  and  soon  after  removed  to 
Livingston  county,  where  he  purchased  two  hundred  acres  of  good  farm  land. 
From  that  time  until  1892  he  was  busily  and  successfully  engaged  in  the 
work  of  cultivating  the  fields  and  caring  for  the  crops.  He  then  retired 
from  active  business  and  removed  to  Dwight,  where  his  remaining  days  were 
passed  in  the  enjoyment  of  well  earned  rest,  his  death  occurring  in  1903. 
His  wife  died  in  1892.  Their  family  numbered  four  children,  namely:  C. 
F.  Ribordy;  Pauline,  a  resident  of  Kempton,  Illinois;  and  Joseph  and  Will- 
iam, who  are  living  in  Ford  county,  this  state. 

At  the  usual  age  C.  F.  Ribordy  became  a  pupil  in  the  public  school  near 
his  father's  home,  and  completed  his  education  in  the  Sugar  Grove  school. 
When  not  occupied  with  his  text-books  his  time  was  largely  given  to  the  work 
of  the  fields  and  year  after  year  he  assisted  in  plowing,  planting  and  harvest- 
ing, until  he  gained  comprehensive  knowledge  of  the  best  methods  of  tilling 
the  soil  and  caring  for  the  crops.  He  continued  on  the  old  homestead  farm 


HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY  719 

until  twenty-seven  years  of  age,  when  he  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss 
Catherine  Lyons,  who  was  born  in  Livingston  county,  Illinois,  in  1867.  Her 
father  is  still  residing  there,  but  the  mother  is  now  deceased.  Their  family 
numbered  eleven  children,  and  unto  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Ribordy  were  born  the 
following  children:  Louisa,  Isabelle,  Florence,  Beatrice,  Raymond  and 
Genevieve  Catherine.  Mrs.  Ribordy  died  on  the  27th  of  January,  1908. 

Following  his  marriage  Mr.  Ribordy  rented  his  father's  farm,  which  he 
cultivated  for  six  years.  His  careful  coatrol  of  expenses  and  his  unfaltering 
industry  brought  him  a  goodly  measure  of  success,  and  he  bought  land  in 
Lee  county,  upon  which  he  lived  for  five  years,  when  he  sold  that  property. 
He  next  invested  in  two  hundred  and  sixty  acres  of  land  on  section  12,  Mont- 
morericy  township,  where  he  now  makes  his  home.  He  has  since  added  to  his 
holdings,  however,  until  his  possessions  aggregate  four  hundred  and  thirty- 
two  acres  in  Whiteside  and  Lee  counties.  His  farm  property  is  valuable, 
owing  to  the  care  and  labor  he  has  bestowed  upon  it,  and  to  the  substantial 
improvements  that  have  been  made.  He  is  engaged  in  the  raising  of  short- 
horn cattle  and  Shropshire  sheep,  and  this  branch  of  his  business  claims 
much  of  his  attention  and  brings  him  a  good  profit.  In  politics  Mr. 
Ribordy  is  a  republican,  but  while  neither  seeking  nor  desiring  office,  he 
has  served  as  school  treasurer.  He  and  his  wife  are  members  of  St.  Mary's 
Catholic  church  of  Sterling.  Mr.  Ribordy  displays  many  of  the  strong  and 
salient  characteristics  of  his  Swiss  ancestry,  and  in  his  business  life  has  mani- 
fested a  strength  of  purpose  that  has  never  permitted  him  to  turn  back  from 
any  work  that  he  has  undertaken,  but  has  always  permitted  his  faithful  exe- 
cution of  the  same.  Year  after  year  he  has  worked  on,  and  his  labors  have 
brought  him  a  gratifying  measure  of  success. 


EUGENE  P.  SULLIVAN,  M.  D. 

Dr.  Eugene  P.  Sullivan  is  engaged  in  the  practice  of  medicine  and  sur- 
gery in  Morrison.  His  life  record  began  in  Madison,  Wisconsin,  on  the  31st 
of  October,  1873.  His  father,  Cornelius  Sullivan,  a  native  of  Ireland,  is  now 
living  in  Chicago,  Illinois,  at  the  age  of  fifty-nine  years.  He  came  to  the 
United  States  about  1858,  and  for  a  time  resided  in  New  York,  after  which 
he  removed  westward  to  Wisconsin,  where  he  engaged  in  business  as  a  rail- 
road contractor.  This  work  took  him  from  one  state  to  another,  but  for  the 
past  ten  years  he  has  made  his  home  in  Chicago.  He  has  been  quite  success- 
ful in  his  business  undertakings,  and  though  he  started  out  in  life  empty- 
handed,  he  is  now  in  possession  of  a  comfortable  competency.  In  politics 
he  is  a  republican,  and  his  religious  faith  is  indicated  by  his  membership  in 
the  Catholic  church.  In  early  manhood  he  wedded  Katherine  Galligher,  who 
was  born  on  the  Emerald  isle,  and  is  now  living  at  the  age  of  fifty-six  years. 
She  came  to  the  United  States,  with  her  parents,  about  1858,  and  the  family 
home  was  established  in  Madison,  Wisconsin.  She  holds  membership  with 
the  Episcopal  church.  By  her  marriage  she  became  the  mother  of  two  sons, 
.the  younger  being  Samuel,  a  practicing  physician  of  Chicago. 


720  HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY 

Dr.  Eugene  P.  Sullivan,  the  elder  son,  was  educated  in  the  public  schools 
of  his  native  city,  passing  through  successive  gra'des  until  he  was  graduated 
from  the  high  school  there.  He  afterward  pursued  a  pre-medical  course  in 
the  University  of  Wisconsin,  and  in  1895  entered  Rush  Medical  College  of 
Chicago,  from  which  he  was  graduated  with  the  class  of  1899.  The  follow- 
ing year  he  began  practice  in  Malvern,  Illinois,  where  he  remained  until 
1902,  when  he  came  to  Morrison,  where  for  six  years  he  has  practiced, 
meeting  with  a  fair  measure  of  success. 

In  1897  Dr.  Sullivan  was  married  to  Miss  Laura  Gertrude  Ennis,  who 
was  born  in  Chicago  in  1875.  They  have  four  children:  Samuel,  Eugenie, 
Lawrence  and  Lorna.  The  parents  are  communicant?  of  the  Catholic  church 
and  Dr.  Sullivan  is  a  member  of  the  Knights  of  Columbus,  the  Modern 
Woodmen  of  America  and  the  Mystic  Workers  of  the  World.  He  belongs 
to  the  Whiteside  County,  the  State,  the  American  and  the  Northern  Central 
Medical  Associations.  His  political  allegiance  is  given  to  the  republican 
party,  but  he  has  never  been  an  aspirant  for  office,  preferring  to  give  his  un- 
divided attention  to  his  professional  duties,  which  are  performed  with  a  sense 
of  conscientious  obligation. 


GEORGE  P.  RICHMOND. 

Almost  six  decades  have  passed  since  George  P.  Richmond  located  in 
WThiteside  county  and  cast  in  his  lot  with  its  early  pioneer  settlers,  so  that 
no  history  of  the  county  would  be  complete  without  mention  of  him.  He 
is  also  one  of  the  largest  landowners  and  stock-raisers  of  this  section  of  the 
state,  being  in  possession  of  nineteen  hundred  acres,  all  in  Whiteside  county 
and  of  this  amount  he  operates  nine  hundred  acres. 

Mr.  Richmond  was  born  in  Berkshire  county,  Massachusetts,  October 
24,  1827,  a  son  of  John  and  Clara  (Parker)  Richmond,  who  were  likewise 
natives  of  the  old  Bay  state,  where  they  spent  their  entire  lives.  Their 
family  numbered  three  sons  and  one  daughter,  namely:  John,  who  resided 
in  Massachusetts,  but  is  now  deceased;  Mary,  who  resides  in  Connecticut; 
George  P.,  of  this  review;  and  Rufus  P.,  deceased. 

George  P.  Richmond  was  a  little  lad  of  eleven  years  when  he  lost  his 
parents,  so  that  he  was  early  thrown  upon  his  own  resources.  He  acquired 
his  education  in  the  common  schools  of  the  east,  wherein  he  obtained  a  fair 
knowledge  of  the  English  branches.  After  the  death  of  his  parents  he  went 
to  live  with  an  uncle,  with  whom  he  remained  until  he  had  attained  his 
majority.  At  that  time,  in  the  year  1849,  he  started  for  Illinois,  hoping 
that  in  the  west  he  might  find  better  advantages  than  could  be  enjoyed  in  the 
older  east.  Accordingly  he  made  his  way  by  water  to  Chicago  and  in  that  . 
city  purchased  a  horse,  which  he  rode  to  Whiteside  county.  Here  he  entered 
one  hundred  and  sixty  acres  of  land  from  the  government,  this  tract  being 
located  on  section  26,  Prophetstown  township.  He  still  owns  his  first  pur- 
chase. He  at  once  began  to  develop  and  improve  the  land  and  in  due  course 


L1BRAHY 

OF  1H£ 

i;»jiVpP.SITV  OF  ILLINOIS 


HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY  723 

of  time  had  it  in  a  good  state  of  fertility.     The  following  year  he  purchased 

ninety-one  acres  more,  and  also  improved  this.     Since  that  time  as  his  finan- 

cial condition  has  permitted  he  has  added  to  his  landed  possessions  until  he 

now  owns  nearly  nineteen  hundred  acre*,  all  in  Prophetstown  township     He 

has  under  his  personal  supervision  nine  hundred  acres  of  this    while  the 

balance  he  rents    so  that  he  is  numbered  among  the  largest  landowners  of 

i  section  of  Illinois.    In  addition  to  raising  the  cereals  best  adapted  to  soil 

d  climate,  he  devotes  much  of  his  land  to  pasturage,  for  since  1857  he  has 

made  a  specialty  of  raising  and  feeding  cattle  and  hogs,  being  extensively 

engaged  in  this  business,  shipping  from  two  to  three  hundred  cattle  each 

year     For  the  past  twenty-five  years  he  has  also  engaged  in  raising  horses, 

handling  Hambletoman  stock,  and  this  also  adds  materially  to  his  annual 

He  is  a  man  of  excellent  business  ability  and  sound  judgment  and 

this  has  proved  the  foundation  of  his  splendid  success 

S  v°n  ohe.,?2d  °f  Feb™ry,  I860,  Mr.  Richmond  was  united  in  marriage 

s  Sevilla  Gage,  who  was  born  in  Whiteside  county,  while  her  parents 

nere  natives  of  Vermont.     She  became  the  mother  of  two  sons  and  a  daugh- 

John,  who  lives  on  the  homestead  farm;  Mrs.  Mary  Passmore,  a  resi- 

st of  Iowa;  and  Harry,  at  home.     The  wife  and  mother,  however,  is  de- 

ceased, her  death  occurring  April  18,  1879. 


rMrtr'Clfinn!      u3S    ~WayS    gi™n    Stanch   SupP°rt    to   the    ^publican 
party  and  has  filled  the  offices  of  school  director  and  assessor.     When  Mr 

Richmond  located  in  Whiteside  county  it  was  still  inhabited  by  the  red  men' 

*h,te  settlers  having  as  yet  ventured  into  the  wild  region  to  establish 

omes.     Deer  and  wolves  were  still  found  roaming  over  the  prairies  and  through 

forests  and  wild  game  was  to  be  had  in  abundance.     There  was  little  to 

e"Zrdgteo   ™,        £    t  fif,Cam6'  bUt  he  POSSeSS6d  a  c™™geous  -PMt  and 
evolved  to  endure  the  hardships  and  privations  which  are  alwavs  to  be  met 

e  ha        t1"  ,          \vln  th!  Sk  deC8deS  Which  have  Since  come  and  g™e 
e  has  not  only  seen  Whiteside  county  grow  from  a  wild  country,  with  only 

a  few  white  inhabitants,  to  a  rich  agricultural  district,  containing  thousands 

homes  and  growing  towns  inhabited  by  an  industrious,  prosperous 

and  progressive  people,  but  he  has  participated  in  the  slow,  persistent  work 

the  a   PTf  ^  ^^  t0  Pr°duCe  this  Sreat  chanSe'  an*  now 

at  t  e  age  of  four  score  years  he  is  supplied  with  all  the  comforts  and  many 

the  luxuries  of  life  and  is  numbered  among  the  venerable  and  highly 
respected  pioneer  settlers  of  .his  section  of  the  state 


ALFRED  P.  PORTER. 

nd  fJ!Tn  f  •  P°rter  1S  ""I  °f  th°  PXtensive  land  °wncrs  of  Whiteside  county 
^ell  known  as  a  real-estate  dealer,  having  in  charge  the  rental  of  vari- 
ou,  piopert.es  and  also  conducting  a  loan  business.     The  enterprising  spirit 

' 


ril   SST'1""  7?  "  hiS"     B°rn  iD  DiX0"'  Illinoi*'  «  thc  °f 

>»,  he  L<  a  son  of  James  and  Paulina  (Bowman)  Porter,  who  were 


724  HISTORY   OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY 

natives  of  the  Empire  state,  born  about  ten  miles  from  Buffalo  and  near  the 
Niagara  Falls. 

The  father,  a  farmer  by  occupation,  came  to  Illinois  in  1846,  settling  at 
Dixon,  where  he  engaged  in  business  as  a  contractor.  He  also  followed  team- 
ing until  1859  and  at  an  early  date  hauled  grain  from  Dixon  to  Chicago  by 
wagon.  The  country,  then  largely  uncultivated  and  undrained,  could  not 
boast  of  excellent  highways.  On  the  contrary,  Mr.  Porter  frequently  became 
stuck  in  the  mud  and  had  to  carry  the  load  out  of  the  mire  upon  his  back,  the 
grain  being  loaded  in  sacks.  After  taking  his  wheat  to  Chicago  he  would  trade 
it  for  produce  and  on  the  return  trip  would  haul  produce  for  his  neighbors  and 
also  goods  for  the  merchants  of  Dixon.  The  pre-ent  generation  can  never 
know,  except  through  hearsay  and  history,  of  the  hardships  endured  by  the 
early  pioneers.  It  was  not  only  the  men  of  the  family  but  the  women  as  well 
who  met  difficulties  and  obstacles  in  the  building  of  the  homes  on  the  fron- 
tier. Theirs  was  a  lot  of  patient  toil  as  they  performed  the  work  of  the  house- 
hold, usually  not  only  preparing  the  meals  and  doing  other  such  tasks  but 
ako  supplying  the  family  with  clothing.  There  was,  however,  much  enjoy- 
ment in  the  life  and  the  people  were  usually  happy  and  contented.  The  spirit 
of  hospitality  reigned  supreme  and  mutual  helpfulness  was  manifest  through- 
out the  pioneer  neighborhoods.  On  leaving  Dixon  in  1859,  James  Porter  re- 
moved to  Harmon,  Lee  county,  Illinois,  being  the  third  or  fourth  settler  in  his 
township.  There  he  carried  on  general  agricultural  pursuits  until  a  year  prior 
to  his  death,  when  he  removed  to  the  village  of  Harmon,  -where  he  died  in  1880, 
when  about  sixty-six  years  of  age.  His  wife  survived  him  until  January  4, 
1900,  passing  away  at  the  age  of  eighty-two  years,  four  months  and  eight 
days,  her  birth  having  occurred  August  '27,  1818.  They  were  Methodists  in 
religious  faith  and  were  loyal  Christian  people,  true  to  the  teachings  of  the 
church.  Mr.  Porter  held  various  township  offices,  being  at  different  times 
supervisor,  assessor  and  collector.  In  politics  he  was  a  republican  and  promi- 
nent in  the  ranks  of  the  party.  His  family  numbered  four  sons  and  four 
daughters  but  only  three  are  now  living:  Cytheria  M..  of  Sterling;  Gula,  the 
wife  of  G.  W.  Hill,  of  Dixon,  Illinois;  and  Alfred  P.,  of  Sterling. 

The  history  of  the  family  can  be  traced  back  to  a  more  remote  period. 
James  Porter,  the  grandfather  of  our  subject,  lived  in  New  York,  near  Buffalo, 
for  many  years,  conducting  a  tavern  on  the  plank  road  at  an  early  day  and 
also  carrying  on  a  farm  there.  He  died  when  about  fifty-two  years  of  age, 
while  his  wife,  Mrs.  Phoebe  (Fairchild)  Porter,  lived  to  be  eighty-four  years  of 
age.  They  had  a  large  family.  The  Porters  were  of  Irish  descent.  The  maternal 
grandfather  was  Benjamin  Bowman,  a  native  of  Pennsylvania,  whence  he 
removed  to  New  York,  settling  near  Buffalo.  He  was  quite  a  prominent  man 
and  founded  the  city  of  Bowmansville,  which  was  named  in  his  honor.  There 
he  extensively  engaged  in  farming  and  also  conducted  a  gristmill,  a  store  and 
a  blacksmith  shop.  Both  he  and  his  wife,  Mrs.  Polly  (Suavely)  Bowman, 
lived  to  be  quite  aged.  Their  family  numbered  two  sons  and  eight  daughters. 

Alfred  P.  Porter  was  only  about  a  year  old  when  his  parents  removed  to 
Lee  county.  He  was  reared  on  his  father's  farm,  early  becoming  familiar  with 
the  duties  and  labors  that  fall  to  the  lot  of  the  agriculturist,  and  upon  the  old 


HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY  725 

homastead  property  he  remained  until  1902.  For  seven  years  he  owned  the 
homestead,  which  he  purchased  and  which  contained  one  hundred  and  sixty 
acres  of  rich  and  productive  land  situated  in  Harmon  township.  His  educa- 
tional privileges  were  those  afforded  by  the  common  schools.  In  his  business 
life  he  early  manifested  keen  discernment  and  marked  enterprise,  and  those 
qualities  have  been  the  salient  elements  in  his  success.  In  1902  he  took  up 
his  abode  in  Sterling,  where  he  began  operating  in  real  estate  and  still  con- 
tinues in  this  line,  doing  business  also  in  making  rentals  and  loans.  He  buy? 
and  sells  on  his  own  account  and  is  now  one  of  the  extensive  landowners  of 
this  part  of  the  state.'  In  addition  to  handling  his  own  property  he  also  sells 
on  commission  and  has  negotiated  many  important  realty  transfers. 

On  the  4th  of  February,  1880,  Mr.  Porter  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss 
Jemima  D.  Keith,  a  daughter  of  George  and  Ann  (Eddy)  Keith.  Six  chil- 
dren were  born  of  that  union :  Ferris  E.,  Lula  E.,  Wayne  H.,  Erma  Z.,  Un- 
dine and  Thelma  Ann.  The  oldest  child,  Ferris,  died  August  5,  1899,  at  the 
age  of  sixteen  years,  and  Wayne  passed  away  at  the  age  of  six  years.  The  old- 
est daughter,  Lula,  is  the  wife  of  T.  E.  Purcell,  a  resident  of  Billings  county, 
North  Dakota,  and  they  have  two  children,  Wayne  H.,  and  Ina.  The  younger 
daughters.  Erma,  Undine  and  Thelma,  are  at  home.  The  wife  and  mother 
died  February  22,  1902,  at  the  age  of  forty-two  years  and  four  months,  passing 
away  in  the  faith  of  the  Methodist  Episcopal  church.  She  was  of  Scotch  line- 
age, her  parents  having  been  born  in  Scotland.  They  became  residents  of 
Rockford,  Illinois,  about  1837  and  engaged  in  farming  in  that  locality.  About 
1861  they  removed  to  a  farm  near  Marion,  Lee  county,  and  upon  that  place 
the  mother  died,  after  which  the  father  removed  to  Nebraska,  where  he  spent 
his  remaining  days.  In  their  family  were  four  sons  and  four  daughters. 

In  his  political  views  Mr.  Porter  is  a  republican  and  in  Lee  county  held 
•some  minor  township  offices,  the  duties  of  which  he  discharged  with  prompt- 
ness and  fidelity.  Since  coming  to  Sterling,  however,  he  has  concentrated  his 
energies  upon  his  business  affairs  and  has  met  with  excellent  success  in  his 
undertakings.  He  possesses  untiring  energy,  is  quick  of  perception,  forms 
his  plans  readily  and  is  determined  in  their  execution,  while  his  close  applica- 
tion to  business  and  his  excellent  management  have  brought  to  him  the  high 
degree  of  prosperity  which  is  today  his. 


ISAAC  S.  BRESSLER, 

Isaac  S.  Bressler,  whose  capably  directed  labor  has  gained  him  a  place 
among  the  men  of  affluence  in  Jordan  township,  lives  on  section  34,  where  he 
is  now  successfully  carrying  on  general  farming.  He  is  one  of  Whiteside 
county's  native  sons,  born  August  23,  1851,  a  son  of  Henry  Bressler,  well 
known  and  honored  as  one  of  the  pioneer  residents  of  this  part  of  the  state. 
He  attended  the  common  schools  until  sixteen  years  of  age  and  afterward  had 
the  benefit  of  a  few  terms  instruction  in  Cornell  College  at  Mount  Vernon, 
Iowa.  After  leaving  college  he  returned  to  his  native  county  and  from  his 


726  HISTORY    OF   WHITESIDE    COUNTY 

grandfather,  Isaac  Bressler,  rented  a  farm  located  on  section  35,  Jordan  town- 
ship.    With  characteristic  energy  he  began  its  development  and  his  labc 
were  soon  manifest  in  the  improved  condition  of  the  fields. 

While  on  the  old  Bressler  farm,  Isaac  S.  Bressler  was  married  to  Miss 
Delora  E.  Brewer,  a  daughter  of  George  W.  Brewer,  of  Sterling.    She  was  born 
December  14,  1851,  in  the  city  of  Sterling  and  comes  from  sturdy  old  Nev 
England  ancestry,  her  parents  removing,  however,  from  the  state  of  New 
York  to  the  west!    George  W.  Brewer  has  made  his  home  in  Whiteside  coun- 
tv  since  1837  and  is  therefore  one  of  its  oldest  residents.     He  was  born  near 
Cooperstown,  Otsego  county,  New  York,  May  6,  1827,  and  was  descended 
from  Revolutionary  ancestry,  his  paternal  grandfather  having  been  a  soldi< 
of  the  American  army  in  the  war  for  independence.     His  father,  1 
Brewer,  was  a  wagonmaker  by  trade  and  in  1836  made  a  prospecting  trip  to 
the  middle  west.     The  following  year  he  started  with  his  family  for  \\  hite- 
side  county,  Illinois,  going  down  the  Allegheny  and  Ohio  rivers  on  a  lumber 
raft     From  Louisville  he  proceeded  by  steamboat  to  St.  Louis  and  from  that 
point  came  to  Whiteside  county.     He  assisted  in  building  a  number  of  the 
first  houses  of  the  county  and  his  family  was  among  the  first  to  establish  a 
home  in  this  part  of  the  state.     He  afterward  built  and  conducted  a  wagon 
shop  and  was  thus  one  of  the  earliest  representatives  of  industnal  interests  in 
Whiteside  county.     He  died  February  27,  1848,  while,  his  wife  passed  away 
Januarv  6    1867.     Their  son,  George  W.  Brewer,  father  of  Mrs.  Bressler,  is 
the  only  survivor  of  a  family  of  nine  children.     He  has  lived  continuously 
in  thi«'countv  for  more  than  seventy  years  and  in  early  life  worked  at  the 
wagonmaker's  trade.    Later  he  turned  his  attention  to  farming,  which  he  fol- 
lowed for  a  long  period,  and  later  gave  his  attention  to  the  purchase  and  sale 
of  land.    Acquiring,  as  the  years  passed  by,  a  handsome  competence,  he  is  now 
living  retired  in  the  enjoyment  of  well  earned  rest.     He  was  married  March 
4   1851,  to  Elizabeth  S.  Green  and  they  became  the  parents  of  four  sons  and 
six  daughters,  of  whom  Mrs.  Bressler  is  the  oldest  surviving.    Extended  men- 
tion is  made  of  George  W.  Brewer  on  another  page  of  this  work. 

Unto  Mr   and  Mrs.  Bressler  have  been  born  three  children:     Fred  Nel- 
son, born  September  12,  1876,  married  Miss  Ray  Zella  Lamar,  of  Chicago, 
a  daughter  of  Raymond  Lamar,  a  photographer  of  that  city.     This  mar- 
riagTwas  celebrated  in  1900  and  unto  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Fred  N.  Bressler  have 
bell  born  three  children:    Gladys,  born  June  30,  1901;  Burton,  deceased    and 
Edward    born  November  19,  1907.     Fred  N.  Bressler  is  a  graduate  of  the 
countrv  schools  and  further  continued  his  studies  in  the  high  school  and  bus- 
ine=s  college,  being  graduated  from  the  latter  with  honors.     At  present  he  ] 
id  ntified  wi  h  commercial  interests  in  Sterling.     George  B.  Bressler,  the  sec- 
ond son  born  December  21,  1880,  after  attending  the  common  schoo  s  pursued 
his  education  in  the  high  school  and  busmess  college  of  Sterling.    In  1 
ten    to  Sago,  whert  he  has  since  resided,  and  at  present  occupies  a  re 
Tponsible  position  with  Crane  &  Company   of  that  city.     He  ™*ff>** 
1905  to  Miss  Dot  Lee,  of  Chicago.    Carrie  E.,  born  December  1,  1887,  b 
her  education  in  the  district  schools  and  afterward  took  up  the ^tudy  .3 f  mmc 
in  Sterling.    In  1907  she  gave  her  hand  in  mamage  to  Frank  L.  ^  eath 


HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY  727 

of  Milledgeville,  Carroll  county,  Illinois,  a  son  of  Thomas  Weatherwax,  de- 
ceased, an  old  settler  of  Carroll  county.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Frank  L.  Weather- 
wax  are  now  living  on  her  father's  farm  on  section  35,  Jordan  township. 

Isaac  S.  Bressler  became  the  owner  of  his  present  farm  in  1883.  He  has 
always  lived  the  life  of  an  enterprising,  active  and  energetic  agriculturist  and 
his  labors  are  attended  with  a  measure  of  success  which  has  gained  him  place 
among  the  men  of  affluence  in  his  county.  His  farm  is  a  well  developed  prop- 
erty, in  the  midst  of  which  stand  substantial  buildings,  while  everything 
about  the  place  is  indicative  of  the  careful  supervision  and  practical  methods 
of  the  owner.  He  is  widely  known  as  a  reliable  business  man  and  trustworthy 
citizen  and  has  an  extensive  circle  of  friends  in  the  county  in  which  his  en- 
tire life  has  been  passed. 


CAPTAIN  JOHN  W.  NILES. 

Captain  John  W.  Mies  is  very  prominent  in  Masonic  circles,  and  is  well 
known  in  Sterling  as  justice  of  the  peace  and  notary  public,  his  official  service 
being  characterized  by  the  utmost  fairness  and  impartiality  in  the  discharge 
of  his  duties.  He  was  born  in  Lebanon,  New  York,  November  11,  1830,  and 
was  one  of  the  eight  children  of  Captain  John  and  Sarah  (Moseley)  Niles, 
natives  of  Madison  county,  New  York.  The  paternal  grandfather,  who  was 
also  Captain  John  Miles,  won  his  title  by  service  with  the  New  York  militia. 
He  was  a  farmer  by  occupation,  and  also  speculated  in  and  raised  hops.  He 
died  in  Madison  county,  New  York,  when  about  seventy  years  of  age,  his 
remains  being  interred  at  Lebanon.  His  wife,  Mrs.  Lydia  (Bryant)  Niles, 
was  a  relative  of  the  famous  poet,  William  Cullen  Bryant,  and  she  had  two 
brothers  who  were  valiant  soldiers  of  the  American  army  in  the  Revolutionary 
war.  Mrs.  Niles  was  more  than  seventy  years  of  age  at  the  time  of  her  death. 
By  her  marriage  she  had  three  sons,  Harvey  and  Luther,  who  were  in  the 
war  of  1812,  and  Captain  John.  The  ancestry  of  the  family  can  be  traced 
still  further  back,  for  Captain  John  Niles,  the  grandfather,  was  the  son  of 
Nahum  Niles,  a  native  of  Massachusetts,  of  English  descent.  He  was  a  Pres- 
byterian minister,  and  in  his  old  age  went  to  Madison  county,  New  York,  to 
live  with  his  children,  passing  away  there  when  well  advanced  in  years.  In 
early  manhood  he  married  Susanna  Cole,  wrhose  brother,  Samuel  Cole,  was 
killed  by  the  Indians  long  prior  to  the  Revolutionary  war,  when  the  red  men 
inhabited  that  section  of  the  country. 

The  maternal  grandfather  of  Captain  Niles,  of  Sterling,  was  Araunah 
Moseley,  a  native  of  western  Massachusetts,  born  near  Hoosac.  He  followed 
agricultural  pursuits  as  a  source  of  livelihood,  and  in  early  manhood  wedded 
Sarah  Shapley,  by  whom  he  had  nine  children,  their  daughter  Sarah,  who 
became  Mrs.  Niles,  being  the  eldest.  Araunah  Moseley  died  in  Lebanon, 
New  York,  at  the  very  venerable  age  of  ninety-three  years,  while  his  wife 
passed  away  in  middle  life.  He  was  the  son  of  Peabody  Moseley,  who  took 
his  younger  children  to  the  Shaker  settlement  in  New  York  and  there  reared 


728  HISTOEY    OF   WHITESIDE    COUNTY 

them.     His  son,  Araunah,  although  not  of  the  Shaker  faith,  won  his  wife 
from  'among  that  sect  and  eloped  with  '  her. 

Captain  John  Niles,  father  of  our  subject,  followed  the  occupation  of 
farming  throughout  his  entire  business  career.  In  1855  he  made  his  way 
westward  to  Iowa  and  settled  in  Jones  county.  After  the  Civil  war  he  re- 
moved to  Sterling,  where  he  died  in  1882,  at  the  age  of  eighty-two  years.  His 
wife  survived  him  two  years,  and  died  at  the  age  of  eighty-two.  Both  were 
consistent  members  of  the  Baptist  church  and  earnest  Christian  people.  As  a 
member  of  the  New  York  Militia  he  commanded  a  company,  thereby  gaining 
the  military  title  by  which  he  was  uniformly  known.  He  filled  the  office  of 
.justice  of  the  peace  in  the  Empire  state,  and  later  in  Iowa,  and  took  an 
active  interest  in  politics.  Unto  him  and  his  wife  were  born  four  sons  and 
four  daughters,  and  of  the  family  five 'are  now  living,  namely:  Sarah  S., 
the  widow  of  David  D.  Jewett,  and  a  resident  of  Sioux  Falls,  South  Dakota; 
John  W. ;  Harvey,  living  at  Anamosa,  Iowa;  Anna  H.,  the  wife  of  Calvert 
Hartshorn,  of  Peabody,  Kansas;  and  S.  Wheeler,  of  Hastings,  Nebraska. 
The  three  who  have  passed  away  are  A.  Moseley,  Mrs.  Susan  N.  Price  and 
Mrs.  Mary  A.  Buell. 

Captain  John  \V.  Niles  was  reared  on  his  father's  farm  and  acquired  his 
education  in  the  district  schools  and  in  Hamilton  Academy.  He  taught  a 
district  school  in  Illinois  and  also  in  Iowa,  being  thus  engaged  up  to  the 
time  of  the  Civil  war.  He  was  also  serving  as  postmaster  at  Madison,  Iowa, 
at  the  time  of  the  outbreak  of  hostilities,  having  been  a  resident  of  that  state 
from  1854.  Interested  in  the  progress  of  events  in  the  south,  his  patriotic 
spirit  was  aroused  by  the  attempt  to  overthrow  the  Union,  and  on  the  12th 
of  August,  1861,  he  offered  his  services  to  the  government,  enlisting  in  Com- 
pany B,  Ninth  Iowa  Volunteer  Infantry,  under  Colonel  Vandever,  who,  re- 
turning from  congress,  raised  a  regiment  and  went  forth  to  battle  for  his 
country  in  the  south.  He  was  afterward  a  congressman  from  California. 
Captain  Niles  enlisted  as  a  private,  but  when  the  company  was  organized 
was  made  orderly  sergeant.  At  the  battle  of  Vicksburg  he  was  promoted  to 
*first  lieutenant  for  gallantry  in  action,  and  when  the  captain  of  the  com- 
pany resigned  he  was  made  its  commander.  He  served  for  four  years,  doing 
valiant  service  for  the  country,  never  faltering  in  the  discharge  of  any  duty 
and  meeting  all  of  the  experiences  of  camp  life.  He  participated  in  the  bat- 
tles of  Pea  Ridge,  Arkansas  Post,  the  assault  and  the  siege  of  Vicksburg,  and 
the  battle  of  Jackson,  Mississippi.  He  was  also  with  Sherman's  army  at 
Lookout  mountain  and  Missionary  Ridge,  all  through  the  Atlantic  campaign, 
and  on  the  celebrated  march  to  the  sea.  He  served  for  four  years,  and  after 
the  grand  review  was  .mustered  out  at  Louisville,  Kentucky,  in  July,  1865, 
returning  home  with  a  most  creditable  military  record. 

Coming  to  Sterling  in  the  fall  of  1865,  Captain  Niles  purchased  some 
land  south  of  the  river  and  engaged  in  farming  until  1875.  He  then  took 
up  his  abode  in  the  city  and  has  since  lived  there.  He  belongs  to  Rock 
River  Lodge.  No.  612,  A.  F.  &  A.  M. ;  Sterling  Chapter,  No.  57,  R.  A.  M., 
and  Sterling  Commandery.  No.  57,  K.  T.  He  was  master  of  the  blue  lodge 
at  one  time  and  is  now  secretarv  of  all  the  Masonic  bodies.  He  is  also  the 


HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY  729 

valued  and  popular  commander  of  Will  Robinson  Post,  No.  274,  which  office 
he  ha.s  filled  for  a  number  of  years.  He  was  one  of  the  organizers  and.  a 
charter  member  of  the  post.  He  is  also  a  member  of  the  Loyal  Legion,  and 
in  community  affairs  he  has  taken  an  active  and  helpful  part  and  was  a 
member  and  secretary  of  the  board  of  education  of  the  Central  school  for 
twenty-three  years.  Upon  his  retirement  W.  W.  Davis  contributed  the  fol- 
lowing complimentary  notice  concerning  the  Captain's  service  on  the  school 
board  to  one  of  the  Sterling  newspapers:  "His  office  was  mostly  identified 
with  what  was  known  as  the  Second  ward  school,  now,  since  consolidation 
with  the  Lincoln,  a.s  district  three.  The  close  of  so  long  and  honorable  a  career 
deserves  more  than  passing  notice.  The  office  of  director  is  peculiar.  There 
is  no  profit,  no  thanks,  plenty  of  criticism,  and  yet  with  the  Captain  it  was  a 
labor  of  love.  Always  ready,  always  on  hand,  never  missing  a  meeting,  regular 
in  visitation,  fertile  in  suggestion,  unerring  in  judgment,  genial  in  intercourse, 
popular  with  the  children  and  with  his  fellow  members,  no  commission  too 
much  trouble  to  execute,  he  has  left  a  record  that  it  will  be  pleasant  to  cherish. 
To  no  one  man  does  the  success  of  our  leading  school  owe  so  much.  In  mat- 
ters of  citizenship  Captain  Niles  is  today  as  loyal  as  when  he  followed  the  old 
flag  on  southern  battlefields  and  his  aid  can  always  be  counted  upon  to  further 
any  movements  for  the  welfare  and  upbuilding  of  Sterling. 


WILLIAM  II.  MIDDAGH. 

William  H.  Middagh,  a  respected  and  representative  farmer  of  Coloma 
township,  living  on  section  32,  was  born  on  the  20th  of  January,  1825,  in 
Ulster  county,  New  York,  his  parents  being  Jacob  H.  and  Catherine  (Win- 
chell)  Middagh,  who  were  natives  of  the  Empire  state.  The  father  was  a 
miller  by  trade  and  also  followed  the  occupation  of  farming.  He  married 
Miss  Catherine  AVinchell,  who  was  likewise  a  native  of  Ulster  county,  New 
York,  and  was  of  German  descent.  They  became  the  parents  of  five  children, 
all  of  whom  reached  adult  age.  namely :  Lemuel,  Susan,  William  H.,  DeWitt 
and  Mary.  DeWitt  was  a  soldier  of  the  Union  army  and  died  of  disease  con- 
tracted in  the  service.  The  parents  passed  their  entire  lives  in  the  Empire 
state. 

William  H.  Middagh  acquired  a  common-school  education  and  in  early 
life  learned  the  miller's  trade,  which  he  followed  for  a  number  of  years.  As 
a  companion  and  helpmate  for  life's  journey  he  chose  Miss  Susie  E.  Brooks, 
to  whom  he  wa,s  married  in  October,  1846.  She,  too,  was  a  native  of  New 
York,  and  they  became  the  parents  of  five  children :  John,  who  died  at  an 
early  age ;  Sylvester ;  Ella,  the  wife  of  William  Stewart,  of  Binghamton,  New 
York,  and  a  prosperous  merchant  and  commercial  traveler;  Ida,  the  wife  of 
Warren  Murray;  and  Horatio. 

For  several  years  after  his  marriage  William  H.  Middagh  continued  to 
operate  the  mill  and  farm  belonging  to  his  father.  On  disposing  of  his  in- 
terests there  he  removed  to  Broome  county,  New  York,  where  he  purchased  a 


730  HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY 

tract  of  land  which  was  mostly  covered  by  timber.  This  he  cleared  and  im- 
proved, building  thereon  a  comfortable  home,  good  barns  and  other  outbuild- 
ings. In  1866  he  sold  that  property  and  removed  westward  to  Whiteside  coun- 
ty, Illinois,  purchasing  the  place  upon  which  he  now  resides  on  section  32, 
Coloma  township.  He  has  lived  a  long  and  busy  life.  His  record  has  been 
checkered  by  mishaps  and  disadvantages  and  yet  by  his  persistency  of  pur- 
pose and  unfaltering  diligence  he  has  achieved  a  goodly  measure  of  success. 
At  one  time  he  suffered  the  loss  of  a  great  number  of  hogs  valued  at  over  two 
thousand  dollars.  He  has  also  lost  valuable  horses  and  other  stock,  but  not- 
withstanding these  obstacles  in  his  path  to  success  he  has  persevered  and  has 
become  one  of  the  substantial  farmers  of  the  county,  lu  all  of  his  business 
dealings  he  has  been  thoroughly  reliable  and  trustworthy.  He  has  never 
sued  a  person  in  all  his  life,  preferring  to  suffer  injustice  and  loss  rather  than 
to  force  his  rights  through  the  processes  of  the  law.  No  man  has  ever  known 
him  to  take  advantage  of  the  necessities  of  another  in  a  business  transaction 
but,  on  the  contrary,  he  is  thoroughly  reliable  and  trustworthy. 

In  1907  Mr.  Middagh  was  called  upon  to  mourn  the  loss  of  his  wife,  who 
died  on  the  10th  of  May,  of  that  year.  Since  then  he  has  been  living  alone 
most  of  the  time  upon  the  old  homestead.  His  daughter,  Mrs.  William  Stew- 
art, who  lives  in  Binghamtou,  New  York,  takes  a  great  interest  in  looking 
after  her  father's  comfort  and  has  tried  to  induce  him  to  leave  the  responsibili- 
ties and  care  of  the  farm  to  others  and  go  and  live  with  her,  but  Mr.  Middagh 
clings  to  the  old  homestead,  where  so  many  happy  years  of  his  life  have  been 
passed. 

His  friends  and  neighbors  have  nothing  for  him  but  the  kindest  words 
and  the  utmost  respect.  His  political  allegiance  is  given  to  the  democracy 
and  he  has  never  sought  nor  desired  office.  He  has  ever  displayed  a  kind,  gen- 
erous disposition,  willing  to  extend  a  helping  hand  to  those  in  need,  and 
throughout  his  community  is  held  in  the  highest  esteem.  He  has  now  passed 
the  eighty-third  milestone  on  life's  journey  and  has  therefore  witnessed  many 
remarkable  events  in  the  history  of  his  country  as  well  as  the  progress  and  up- 
building of  his  adopted  county. 


NATHAN  THOMPSON. 

There  are  few  men  whose  lives  are  crowned  with  the  honor  and  respect 
which  is  uniformly  accorded  to  Nathan  Thompson,  but  through  many  years' 
connection  with  the  history  of  Prophetstown  and  Whiteside  county  his  has 
been  an  unblemished  character.  With  him  success  in  life  has  been  reached 
by  his  sterling  qualities  of  heart  and  mind,  true  to  every  manly  principle. 
He  has  never  deviated  from  what  his  judgment  would  indicate  to  be  right 
and  honorable  between  his  fellowmen  and  himself  and  with  this  as  a  founda- 
tion he  has  builded  thereon  by  reason  of  his  energy,  determination  and 
utilization  of  opportunities  and  has  won  a  success  that  is  as  gratifying  and 
honorable  as  it  is  substantial.  After  a  long  and  eventful  career  he  can  look 


LIBRARY 
Of  I  HE 


HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY  733 

back  over  the  past  with  pride  and  enjoy  the  declining  years  of  his  earthly 
pilgrimage  with  a  consciousness  of  having  gained  for  himself  by  his  straight- 
forward career  the  confidence  and  respect  of  the  entire  community  in  which 
he  lives. 

Mr.  Thompson  is  a  native  of  Galway,  Saratoga  county,  New  York,  born 
March  9,  1822.  In  early  colonial  days  the  family,  which  is  of  Scotch-Irish 
origin,  was  founded  in  America,  being  established  in  Boston  in  1718.  Rep- 
resentatives of  the  name  went  to  Saratoga  county,  New  York,  at  the  close  of 
the  French  and  Indian  war  in  1763.  The  family  was  represented  in  the 
Revolutionary  war  by  John  Thompson,  who  attained  the  rank  of  captain 
and  when  Stillwater  township,  Saratoga  county,  New  York,  was  organized 
in  1788  he  became  one  of  its  first  justices,  while  in  that  year  and  in  1789 
he  was  also  a  member  of  the  state  assembly.  In  1791  when  Saratoga  was 
organized  as  a  county,  John  Thompson^  was  appointed  the  first  judge  and 
filled  the  office  for  eighteen  years,  or  until  1809,  when  he  reached  the  age 
of  limit  fixed  by  law  and  retired.  He  was  a  member  of  the  constitutional 
convention  of  1801  and  was  later  a  representative  to  the  sixth,  tenth  and 
eleventh  congresses.  He  thus  left  the  impress  of  hia  individuality  upon  the 
judicial  and  legislative  history  of  his  county,  state  and  nation  and  took  a 
most  active  and  helpful  part  in  promoting  its  interests  during  its  formative 
period.  His  son,  James  Thompson,  also  served  as  county  judge,  his  judicial 
career  closing  in  1833,  while  his  death  occurred  in  1845.  His  second  son, 
John  Whalen  Thompson,  born  December  19,  1808,  seemed  to  have  inherited 
the  mental  powers  of  his  father  and  grandfather  and  was  graduated  with 
honor  at  Union  College  in  1827.  Studying  law,  he  was  admitted  to  the  bar 
in  1831  and  in  1834  was  appointed  by  Governor  Marcy  surrogate  of  Sara- 
toga county  to  fill  the  position  until  1846,  when  the  new  constitution  took 
effect,  He  assisted  in  organizing  the  Ballston  Spa  (N.  Y.)  bank  in  1838  and 
was  its  president  from  1856  until  his  death,  June  28,  1892.  His  son,  George 
Lee,  succeeded  him  to  the  presidency  and  died  December  29,  1895.  The  two 
younger  sons  of  John  Thompson,  Samuel  and  Frank,  both  reside  at  the  old 
homestead.  Of  the  sons  of  Judge  John  Thompson,  the  grandfather  of  our 
subject,  William  became  a  prominent  lawyer  of  Obed,  New  York,  nnd 
Charles  an  active  business  man  of  Seneca  Falls,  New  York. 

The  other  son  was  Dr.  Nathan  Thompson,  the  father  of  our  subject. 
He  was  born  in  Saratoga  county,  in  March,  1778,  and  became  a  leading 
physician  of  his  native  county,  where  he  married  Miss  Lucy  Plumb,  who 
was  born  in  Connecticut  and  at  an  early  day  became  a  resident  of  Oneida 
county,  New  York.  They  had  six  children:  Emma,  Mary,  Charles,  Mar- 
tha, Nathan  and  Ralph,  but  only  Martha  and  Nathan  are  now  living  and  for 
many  years  she  has  made  her  home  with  Mr.  Thompson,  of  this  review. 

"Fortunate  is  the  man  who  has  back  of  him  an  ancestry  honorable  and 
distinguished,"  and  in  this  respect  Nathan  Thompson  is  blessed.  He  was 
reared  amid  refining  influences  upon  a  farm  in  his  native  county,  where 
good  educational  privileges  were  afforded  him  by  the  public  schools.  He 
lost  his  father  when  young,  but  continued  to  reside  in  Saratoga  county  until 
he  attained  his  majority.  After  mastering  the  common  branches  of  learning 


734  HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY 

he  later  spent  the  winter  seasons  as  a  student  in  an  academy.  The  west 
attracted  him  and  in  1843  he  made  'his  way  to  Illinois  in  company  with  his 
two  cousins,  Robert  and  Isaac  Seers,  traveling  by  way  of  the  Great  Lakes  to 
Milwaukee  and  thence  overland  to  Elgin,  Kane  county.  When  two  years 
had  passed  Mr.  Thompson  took  up  his  abode  in  Whiteside  county,  settling 
at  Prophetstown,  where  he  put  in  a  crop  for  his  cousins,  who  purchased  a 
farm  here.  Sixty-three  years  have  since  come  and  gone  and  Nathan  Thomp- 
son yet  remains  a  valued  resident  of  this  county,  where  for  many  years  he 
labored  actively  and  untiringly,  promoting  public  progress  while  advancing 
individual  success.  The  only  break  in  his  residence  here  came  in  1851, 
where  he  went  to  Peru  and  there  engaged  in  working  in  a  plow  factory,  but 
the  following  year  he  returned  to  this  county.  In  the  meantime,  however, 
he  had  spent  about  a  year  as  a  clerk  in  a  store  and  through  one  winter  had 
operated  a  horse-power  sawmill  in  Portland  Grove.  Going  to  Peru,  he  was 
employed  in  the  plow  works  of  Tuller,  Dodge  &  Pitts,  and  upon  his  return 
to  Prophetstown  in  1852,  embarked  in  business  on  his  own  account  as  pro- 
prietor of  a  general  store  under  the  firm  style  of  Nathan  Thompson  &  Com- 
pany, his  partner  being  N.  Tuller.  He  erected  an  extensive  store  building 
and  for  fifteen  years  was  actively  associated  with  the  business.  He  did  not 
confine  his  attention  entirely  to  this  line,  however,  but  as  opportunity  offered 
made  judicious  and  extensive  investments  in  property,  controlled  his  farm- 
ing interests  and  also  did  contract  work  on  the  county  ditches.  In  this 
connection  he  constructed  nine  miles  of  county  ditches  and  with  another 
party  graded  the  railroad  from  Rock  river  to  Green  river.  His  business 
interets  have  invariably  been  of  a  character  that  have  contributed  to  the 
general  improvement  as  well  as  to  individual  success.  Later  he  gave  most 
of  his  attention  to  overseeing  his  farms,  having  four  or  five  hundred  acres 
of  valuable  land,  but  in  more  recent  years  he  has  disposed  of  this  property. 
He  never  resided  upon  a  farm,  but  always  made  his  home  in  Prophetstown 
and  from  that  point  gave  his  supervision  to  his  agricultural  interests.  ^AIS 
name  figures  conspicuously  in  connection  with  financial  circles,  for  from 
1872  until  1878  he  was  identified  with  the  banking  interests  of  Prophets- 
town  and  in  1902  became  one  of  the  organizers  of  the  Farmers'  National 
Bank,  of  which  he  has  since  been  president.  This  institution  is  capitalized 
for  sixty  thousand  dollars  and  is  recognized  as  one  of  the  strong  moneyed 
concerns  of  the  county. 

Mr.  Thompson  was  married  in  December,  1867,  to  Mrs.  Sarah  J.  Parrott, 
whose  first  husband  was  killed  in  the  army.  She  was  born  and  educated  in 
Vermont,  and  for  fifteen  years  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Thompson  traveled  life's  journey 
happily  together,  after  which  they  were  separated  by  the  death  of  the  wife, 
who  in  1882.  was  laid  to  rest  in  Prophetstown  cemetery.  His  sister  Martha 
has  since  acted  as  his  housekeeper.  Mr.  Thompson  has  never  affiliated  with 
fraternal  organizations  nor  has  he  held  membership  in  any  church.  His 
political  support  was  given  to  James  K.  Polk  in  1844,  for,  although  he  was 
not  residing  here  at  the  time,  he  cast  his  vote  in  Prophetstown  by  reason  of 
the  fact  that  he  was  a  resident  of  the  congressional  district.  He  has  since 
been  a  stalwart  democrat  and  has  held  some  local  offices,  although  his  aspira- 


HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY  735 

tion  and  ambitions  have  not  been  in  the  line  of  office-holding.  He  has  pre- 
ferred to  concentrate  his  time  and  energies  upon  his  business  interests  and 
the  story  of  his  success  is  well  known  in  this  county.  We  read  of  the  lives  of 
the  heroes  of  the  past  and  they  not  only  prove  of  historical  interest  but  serve 
also  to  inspire  and  encourage ;  yet  we  need  not  go  to  former  ages  for  examples 
that  are  worthy  of  emulation.  The  men  of  today  who  have  won  success  and 
honor  equal  in  exemplary  traits  of  character  those  who  have  passed  away, 
and  the  life  of  Nathan  Thompson  may  well  prove  of  great  benefit  if  we  will 
but  heed  the  obvious  lessons  which  it  contains.  He  has  now  reached  the 
eighty-sixth  milestone  on  life's  journey.  He  has  ever  been  a  man  of  strength 
of  character,  of  strong  will  and  of  determined  purpose,  holding  closely  to  the 
ideals  that  he  has  believed  to  be  right  and  winning  his  success  by  judicious 
investments.  His  path  has  never  been  strewn  with  the  wreck  of  other  men's 
fortunes,  and  on  the  contrary  the  public  has  been  an  indirect  beneficiary  in 
much  that  he  has  accomplished. 


CLARENCE  F.  SENIOR. 

Clarence  F.  Senior,  successfully  engaged  in  fanning  and  stock-raising  in 
Garden  Plain  township,  is  a  native  son  of  this  township,  his  parents  being  H. 
R.  and  Emma  (Stone)  Senior.  The  father's  birth  also  occurred  in  Garden 
Plain  township,  December  4,  1850,  the  grandfather,  John  Senior,  having  come 
to  Whiteside  county  some  years  prior  to  his  marriage.  Harvey  R.  Senior  was 
reared  upon  the  home  farm  and  educated  in  the  country  schools.  He  was  left 
an  orphan  at  an  early  age  and  his  opportunities  in  youth  were  about  like  those 
of  the  average  boy  in  a  frontier  community.  When  he  had  attained  his  major- 
ity he  commenced  farming  on  his  own  account  on  land  purchased  by  the 
family  and  for  a  long  period  continued  actively  in  general  agricultural  pur- 
suits. By  reason  of  his  early  training  he  was  well  qualified  for  the  occupation 
which  he  made  his  life  work,  his  untiring  industry  and  capable  business  man- 
agement winning  for  him  a  gratifying  measure  of  prosperity.  He  is  now,  how- 
ever, living  retired,  giving  his  attention  merely  to  his  invested  interests.  In 
1902,  in  connection  with  Dr.  S.  B.  Dimond  and  C.  E.  Peck,  he  organized  the 
First  National  Bank  of  Albany,  of  which  he  is  a  director  and  the  vice  presi- 
dent. 'For  a  number  of  years  he  was  also  president  of  the  Garden  Plain  Mutual 
Fire  Insurance  Company.  Unto  him  and  his  wife  were  born  four  children : 
Clarence  F.,  of  this  review;  Newell  K.,  a  resident  of  Garden  Plain  township; 
and  Olive  L.  and  Emily  B.,  at  home.  H.  R.  Senior  was  elected  county  super- 
visor in  1889  arid  was  continued  in  the  office  by  reelection  to  the  year  1907, 
when  he  resigned.  He  is  widely  recognized  as  one  of  the  county's  representa- 
tive and  enterprising  citizens,  whose  success  has  been  gained  through  methods 
which  neither  seek  nor  require  disguise. 

Clarence  F.  Senior  first  attended  school  in  his  native  township  and  subse- 
quently continued  his  studies  in  the  schools  of  Albany  and  Port  Byron,  while 
at  Fulton,  Illinois,  he  also  took  a  commercial  course.  After  leaving  school  he 


736  HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY 

engaged  in  farming  on  his  father's  land  and  when  he  had  attained  his  ma- 
jority began  the  operation  of  rented  land,  being  successfully  engaged  in  its 
cultivation  for  two  years.  On  the  expiration  of  that  period  he  purchased 
ninety-one  acres  of  slightly  improved  land  at  sixty  dollars  per  acre,  which  he 
has  highly  developed  and  on  which  he  has  placed  many  modern  improve- 
ments, including  barns,  a  scale  house  and  other  accessories  and  conveniences 
which  constitute  a  model  farming  property.  In  1907  he  erected  a  handsome 
frame  residence,  two  stories  in  height,  one  of  the  finest  farm  homes  in  the 
Bounty.  In  addition  to  the  work  of  the  fields  Mr.  Senior  makes  a  specialty  of 
raising  and  feeding  cattle  and  hogs  and  in  both  branches  of  his  business  is 
meeting  with  a  gratifying  and  well  merited  measure  of  success,  being  well 
known  as  one  of  the  progressive  and  wide-awake  agriculturists  and  stock- 
raisers  of  the  community. 

In  1901  Mr.  Senior  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Sadie  E.  Stroud,  of 
Garden  Plain  township,  a  daughter  of  John  and  Hattie  (Emmons)  Stroud, 
who,  after  residing  in  Kansas  for  some  years,  returned  to  Whiteside  county. 
The  Stroud  family  came  from  Pennsylvania,  while  members  of  the  Emmons 
family  were  early  settlers  of  this  county.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Stroud  still  survive, 
the  former  being  engaged  in  fanning  in  Garden  Plain  township,  where  he  is 
well  and  favorably  known.  They  have  four  children:  Frank,  who  is  a  tele- 
graph operator;  Mrs.  Senior;  John,  a  telegraph  operator  of  Leland,  Illinois; 
and  Leonard,  at  home.  Unto  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Senior  have  been  born  two  chil- 
dren: Evelyn,  and  Everett,  deceased. 

Mr.  Senior  is  a  stalwart  champion  of  the  republican  party,  and  his  wife  is 
a  member  of  the  Presbyterian  church.  Their  lives  have  ever  been  actuated  by 
high  principles  and  worthy  motives  and  thus  they  have  gained  the  respect 
.and  esteem  of  all  with  whom  thev  have  come  in  contact. 


JAMES  W.  ENTWHISTLE. 

James  W.  Entwhistle  'is  the  owner  of  a  -valuable  farm  of  two  hundred 
and  forty  acres  on  section  34,  Ustick  township,  and  the  place  returns  to  him 
a  good  annual  income  because  of  the  care  and  labor  he  bestows  upon  it.  He 
has  made  his  home  in  Whiteside  county  since  1871  and  his  residence  in  Illi- 
nois dates  from  1836.  He  was  born  in  Philadelphia,  August  30,  1831,  and  was 
therefore  a  little  less  than  five  years  of  age  when  with  his  parents  he  came 
1o  this  state,  the  family  home  being  established  in  Galena,  Jo  Daviess  county. 
His  father,  James  Entwhistle,  a  weaver  and  farmer,  spent  his  early  life  in 
Philadelphia.  In  the  year  1835  he  made  his  way  from  Philadelphia  to  Illi- 
nois, and  settling  on  the  frontier,  he  aided  in  reclaiming  it  for  the  purposes  | 
of  civilization.  He  belonged  to  the  Protestant  Episcopal  church  and  was  a 
man  of  high  character.  His  political  allegiance  was  given  to  the  republican 
party.  In  Philadelphia  he  married  Miss  Margaret  Wilson  and  their  children 
were:  Ellen,  who  died  in  Philadelphia  in  early  childhood;  John;  Thomas; 
James  W. ;  Mary  Ann,  who  died  in  Whiteside  county;  and  Robert,  who  is  aj 
retired  farmer  of  Tamaroa,  Illinois. 


HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY  737 

In  Galena,  Jo  Daviess  county,  amid  the  wild  scenes  and  environments  of 
pioneer  life,  James  W.  Entwhistle  was  reared.  There  were  still  many  evi- 
dences of  Indian  occupancy  in  the  state.  U.  S.  Grant,  who  was  afterward 
to  attain  national  prominence  as  a  military  hero  and  to  be  honored  with  the 
highest  official  position  in  the  gift  of  the  nation,  was  in  those  early  times  a 
worker  in  the  lead  mines  at  Galena  and  no  one  dreamed  of  the  destiny  that 
awaited  him.  The  greater  part  of  the  land  now  embraced  within  the  borders- 
of  the  state  was  still  owned  by  the  government  and  the  city  of  Chicago  had 
not  been  incorporated  at  the  time  of  Mr.  Entwhistle's  arrival  in  Illinois.  He 
was  identified  Avith  the  early  development  of  Jo  Daviess  county,  where  he  con- 
tinued to  live  for  thirty-five  years  or  until  1871,  when  he  came  to  Whiteside 
county  and  bought  a  farm  of  Hiram  Strattori,  an  early  settler.  He  also  bought 
from  John  Kent  a  tract  of  land,  upon  which  his  son,  J.  J.  Entwhistle,  now 
resides. 

Mr.  Entwhistle  had  been  married  in  Elizabeth,  Jo  Daviess  county,  to  Miss 
Ellen  Lawton  on  the  4th  of  January,  1855.  She  was  born  June  13,  1835,  near 
Hudson,  New  York.  Her  parents  were  natives  of  England  and  came  to  the 
United  States  in  1828.  The  father  died  in  New  York  and  the  mother  after- 
ward became  a  resident  of  Jo  Daviess  county,  Illinois.  In  the  Lawton  family 
were  several  children,  namely:  Joseph,  a  retired  farmer  now  living  in  Han- 
over, Illinois;  Mrs.  Caroline  Moser,  a  resident  of  Dubuque,  Iowa;  and  Oliver 
C.  Lawton,  a  farmer  residing  in  Union  Grove  township,  this  county.  Unto  Mr, 
and  Mrs.  Entwhistle  have  been  born  the  following  named:  Mrs.  Margaret 
Odlin,  who  resides  in  Union  Grove  township;  John  James,  who  operates  a 
part  of  his  father's  farm  in  Ustick  township  and  who  for  several  years  has 
been  supervisor  there ;  Caroline,  the  wife  of  W.  L.  Abbott,  of  Chicago,  a  brother 
of  A.  N.  Abbott,  who  is  mentioned  elsewhere  in  this  volume ;  Elmer  Ellsworth, 
who  died  at  the  age  of  two  years;  Hannah,  at  home;  George  W.,  who  is  operat- 
ing a  farm  of  his  own  and  also  a  part  of  his  father's  land  in  Ustick  township ; 
and  Nellie,  who  died  in  infancy. 

Mr.  Entwhistle  is  today  the  owner  of  a  valuable  farm  property  of  two 
hundred  and  forty  acres  situated  on  section  34,  Ustick  township.  It  is  the  vis- 
ible evidence  of  his  life  of  thrift  and  industry,  as  his  possessions  have  been  ac- 
quired entirely  through  his  own  labor.  He  has  lived  to  witness  remarkable 
changes  in  the  state  and  in  the  methods  of  farm  life  as  well.  His  memory 
goes  back  to  a  day  when  the  homes  were  largely  log  cabins  or  unpretentious 
frame  dwellings.  Today  the  great  majority  of  farm  houses  are  commodious 
and  substantial  residences  built  in  modern  and  attractive  style  of  architecture. 
The  farm  machinery,  too,  is  totally  unlike  that  in  use  many  years  ago  and  in 
his  work  Mr.  Entwhistle  has  always  kept  in  touch  with  modern,  progressive 
ideas.  He  says  he  remembers  one  year  in  which  there  was  no  summer  here, 
the  season  being  so  cold  throughout  the  entire  year  that  very  poor  crops  were 
harvested.  He  can  remember,  too,  when  great  stretches  of  the  country  were 
covered  with  the  native  prairie  grasses,  starred  with  a  million  flowers  in  June 
and  in  December  covered  with  one  unbroken  sheet  of  snow.  Deer  and  other 
wild  game  could  be  had  and  wolves  and  other  wild  animals  were  heard  in  the 
forests  and  on  the  prairies.  He  has  not  only  lived  to  witness  a  remarkable 


738  HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY 

change  but  has  borne  his  part  in  the  work  which  has  brought  this  about  and 
is  regarded  as  one  of  the  valued  and  representative  citizens  of  his  community. 
The  cause  of  education  has  always  found  in  him  a  warm  friend  and  he  has 
served  as  school  trustee,  while  his  religious  faith  is  indicated  by  his  member- 
ship in  the  Episcopal  church. 


JONAS  H.  BAER. 

Like  the  other  thriving  towns  and  cities  of  the  middle  west,  Sterling  has 
its  full  quota  of  enterprising,  energetic  business  men, — men  who  recognize 
and  utilize  opportunities  and  s>o  place  their  investments  and  direct  their  ener- 
gies as  to  win  success.  To  this  class  belongs  Jonas  H.  Baer,  engaged  in  the 
real-estate,  loan  and  insurance  business.  He  is  one  of  the  large  landowners, 
having  excellent  income  property. 

A  native  of  Pennsylvania,  Mr.  Baer  was  born  in  Lancaster  county,  in 
January,  1853.  His  parents  were  Martin  and  Mary  (Herr)  Baer,  also  natives 
of  that  county.  The  paternal  grandfather  likewise  bore  the  name  of  Martin 
Baer  and  was  born  in  the  Keystone  state.  For  many  years  he  followed  farm- 
ing in  Lancaster  county  and  died  there  when  well  advanced  in  years,  while 
his  wife,  Mrs.  Martha  Baer.  was  eighty-two  years  of  age  at  the  time  of  her 
demise.  The  founder  of  the  family  in  America  was  the  father  of  Martin  Baer, 
Sr.,  who  came  from  Germany  to  the  new  world  and  settled  in  Lancaster 
county. 

Martin  Baer,  the  father  of  Jonas  H.  Baer,  devoted  his  entire  life  to  gen- 
eral agricultural  pursuits  and  in  1857  came  to  Whiteside  county,  Illinois, 
taking  up  his  abode  upon  a  farm  in  Jordan  township,  where  he  continued  to 
engage  in  the  tilling  of  the  soil  until  his  death,  which  occurred  May  3,  1887, 
when  he  was  sixty-two  years  of  age.  His  wife  still  survives  him  and  in  relig- 
ious faith  is  a  Mennonite,  of  which  sect  Mr.  Baer  was  likewise  a  representative. 
He  held  various  township  offices  and  in  community  affairs  took  a  deep  and 
helpful  interest.  He  was  a  very  frugal  and  industrious  man,  was  well  read 
and,  by  reason  of  his  many  excellent  traits  of  character,  commanded  the  con- 
fidence and  respect  of  his  neighbors  and  friends  and  became  one  of  the  influ- 
ential farmers  of  Jordan  township.  Prospering  in  his  business  undertakings 
he  added  to  his  possessions  from  time  to  time  until  he  became  the  owner  of  five 
farms  embracing  eight  hundred  acres.  In  early  manhood  he  wedded  Mary 
Herr,  a  daughter  of  Henry  and  Catharine  Herr,  who  were  natives  of  Pennsyl- 
vania and  lived  in  Lancaster  county.  Her  father  was  a  farmer  and  always 
made  his  home  in  the  east  but  paid  a  number  of  visits  to  Whiteside  county, 
Illinois.  He  died  at  an  advanced  age  and  his  wife  when  about  sixty,  her 
death  resulting  from  an  accident.  They  were  the  parents  of  ten  children,  in- 
cluding Mrs.  Martin  Baer,  who  by  her  marriage  became  the  mother  of  five 
sons  and  two  daughters,  four  of  whom  are  now  living,  namely:  Henry,  of 
Jordan  township;  Jonas  H.,  of  Sterling;  Elizabeth,  the  wife  of  John  Hey,  of 
Sterling;  and  Catharine,  the  wife  of  Samuel  Myers,  who  resides  a  mile  north 
of  the  city.  Those  deceased  arc  Ezra,  Abraham  and  Frank. 


HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY  739 

J.  II.  Baer  of  this  review  was  but  four  years  of  age  when  he  came  with 
his  parents  to  Whiteside  county  and  was  here  reared  to  manhood  upon  his 
father'.8  farm  in  Jordan  township.  In  his  youth  his  time  was  alternated  be- 
tween the  acquirement  of  a  district-school  education  and  the  work  of  the  home 
farm.  He  continued  to  live  upon  the  old  homestead  until  1874,  when  he 
removed  to  a  farm  which  he  purchased  in  1886,  living  there  until  his  removal 
to  Sterling  in  1903.  Here  he  is  engaged  in  the  real-estate  business.  He  now 
buys  and  sells  farms  and  farming  land  on  his  own  account  as  well  as  on  com- 
mission. He  owns  several  farms  in  South  Dakota,  near  Plankington,  and  the 
remainder  in  Nebraska.  His  residence  is  at  No.  504  Seventh  avenue  and  he  is 
likewise  the  owner  of  this  property. 

On  the  12th  of  September,  1876,  Mr.  Baer  was  married  to  Miss  Annie 
H.  Rutt.  a  daughter  of  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Jacob  Rutt,  who  came  fro"m  Franklin 
county,  Pennsylvania,  to  Illinois  in  1864  and  settled  near  Prairieville,  Lee 
county.  Mr.  Rutt  followed  farming  there  for  many  years  and  his  wife  passed 
away  there.  He  afterwards  removed  to  Adams  county,  Nebraska,  locating 
near  the  town  of  Ayr.  By  his  first  marriage  he  had  the  following  children : 
Jacob;  Henry;  Susan,  the  wife  of  Christian  Ebersole;  Hetty,  the  wife  of 
Joseph  B.  Detweiler;  Mary,  the  deceased  wife  of  Martin  Andreas;  Fannie,  the 
wife  of  J.  S.  Detweiler ;  and  Annie,  now  Mrs.  Baer.  Unto  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Baer 
have  been  born  two  sons — Roy  R.  and  Bert,  and  they  have  also  an  adopted 
daughter,  Hazel  May. 

The  parents  are  members  of  the  English  Lutheran  church,  in  the  work 
of  which  they  are  much  interested.  Mr.  Baer  has  been  supervisor  of  Jordan 
township  seven  terms  and  school  treasurer  for  about  five  years,  and  his  fidel- 
ity in  orfice  is  indicated  by  the  length  of  his  service.  Politically  he  is  a  pro- 
hibitionist and  his  influence  is  ever  found  on  the  side  of  those  agencies  which 
work  for  the  moral  betterment  of  the  race.  He  stands  for  justice,  truth  and 
right,  and  as  an  influential  factor  in  public  life  in  his  community  he  is  well 
known. 


WINGFIELI)  J.  HARDY. 

Wingfield  J.  Hardy  owns  and  cultivates  an  excellent  farm  of  one  hun- 
dred and  ten  acres  in  Mount  Pleasant  township  and  is  numbered  among  the 
leading  representative  agriculturists  of  his  community.  He  was  born  upon 
this  farm  on  section  34,  February  12,  1858,  and  is  a  son  of  William  and 
Keziah  (Richardson)  Hardy,  of  whom  extended  mention  is  made  in  connec- 
tion with  the  sketch  of  A.  W.  Hardy  on  another  page  of  this  work.  No  event 
of  special  importance  occurred  to  vary  the  routine  of  farm  life  for  Wingfield 
J.  Hardy  in  his  boyhood  and  youth.  His  time  was  divided  between  the  work 
of  the  schoolroom,  the  pleasures  of  the  playground  and  the  tasks  connected 
with  the  improvement  of  the  fields.  His  early  experience  as  a  farmer  well 
qualified  him  to  carry  on  the  work  which  now  claims  his  time  and  energies. 
He  has  always  followed  general  farming  and  is  today  the  owner  of  one  hun- 


740  HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY 

dred  and  ten  acres  of  rich  and  productive  land  on  sections  27  and  34,  Mount 
Pleasant  township.  He  has  brought  the  fields  into  a  state  of  rich  fertility  and 
annually  harvests  good  crops  as  a  reward  for  the  care  and  labor  which  he  be- 
stows upon  the  land. 

Mr.  Hardy  was  married  in  1882  to  Miss  Elva  E.  Seaman,  who  was  born 
in  Lyndon  township  and  is  a  daughter  of  David  and  Amy  (Sweet)  Seaman. 
One  son  of  that  family  died  in  infancy.  The  father,  who  was  born  June 
13,  1825,  departed  this  life  in  the  year  of  1859,  while  the  mother,  who  was 
born  February  11,  1834,  is  now  living  in  Morrison.  Since  the  death  of  her 
first  husband  she  has  become  the  wife  of  William  Hicks. 

Unto  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Hardy  have  been  born  two  sons — Raymond  and  Carl 
A.  The  elder,  born  December  29,  1883,  married  Lillian  E.  Allen,  of  Lyndon, 
where  he  now  resides.  Carl  A.,  born  October  9,  1888,  is  at  home  with  his 
parents.  The  family  are  widely  and  favorably  known  in  this  community, 
their  many  good  traits  of  character  winning  them  the  kindly  regard  and  good 
will  of  those  with  whom  they  have  been  brought  in  contact.  Mr.  Hardy  is  a 
stalwart  advocate  of  the  republican  party,  believing  thoroughly  in  its  prin- 
ciples, and  giving  to  it  earnest  support.  He  and  his  wife  are  members  of  the 
Mystic  Workers  and  of  the  Fraternal  Tribune. 


WILLIAM  WHITE   DAVIS. 

William  White  Davis  was  born  in  New  Holland,  Lancaster  county, 
Pennsylvania,  October  25,  1836.  His  father,  Gabriel  Davis,  had  Scotch, 
Irish  and  W'elsh  blood  in  his  veins.  John  Anderson,  one  of  his  ancestors, 
was  born  in  County  Antrim,  Ireland,  in  1728.  Jenkins  Davis  emigrated 
from  County  Cardigan,  Wales,  early  in  1700.  They  settled  in  eastern  Penn- 
sylvania. The  great-grandfather  of  William  W.  was  an  active  patriot  in  the 
Revolutionary  war,  being  member  of  the  committee  of  safety,  and  captain 
of  a  military  company.  The  mother  of  William  W.  was  Susanna  Roland 
Diller,  daughter  of  Jonathan  Diller  and  Ann  Weaver.  German  on  both 
sides.  Gabriel  Davis  and  Susanna  Diller  were  married  in  Philadelphia, 
1835,  at  the  Episcopal  residence  by  William  White,  first  bishop  of  Penn- 
sylvania. From  this  venerable  and  saintly  prelate,  the  first  son  of  this 
marriage,  William  WThite  received  his  name. 

William  grew  up  in  New  Holland  and  received  his  early  education 
in  the  village  school.  Two  pleasing  and  profitable  episodes  in  his  youthful 
years.  In  1849  he  accompanied  his  father  to  Washington  and  saw  Presi- 
dent Taylor,  Henry  Clay,  Thomas  H.  Benton,  and  the  giants  of  that  time. 
In  1851  he  and  his  father  made  a  delightful  tour  of  two  months  in  the 
west,  going  to  Pittsburg  by  rail  and  canal,  by  boat  on  Ohio  and  Mississippi, 
traveled  by  stage  over  Illinois,  had  an  interview  with  Lincoln  at  Springfield, 
returning  by  Chicago,  Niagara  Falls,  Hudson  and  New  York.  From  1852 
to  1853  he  was  at  the  Lancaster  high  school,  from  1853  to  1856  at  Franklin 
and  Marshall  College.  He  took  the  honors  of  his  class  at  commencement 


MRS.   W.  W.  DAVIS 


LIBRARY 
OF  THE 
"DIVERSITY  OF  IUWO! 


10 


HISTORY    OF    WH1TESIDE    COUNTY  743 

and  had  the  distinction  of  delivering  his  address,  "Decline  of  Political 
Integrity,"  before  the  coming  president,  James  Buchanan. 

Removing  to  Sterling,  Illinois,  with  his  father's  family,  Mr.  Davis 
entered  upon  the  profession  of  teaching,  which  he  continued  for  twenty 
years.  During  his  stay  at  Dixon,  he  prepared  a  small  manual  on  Composi- 
tion Writing,  which  was  published  by  George  Sherwood,  Chicago,  and 
received  the  commendation  of  Newton  Bateman,  Richard  Edwards  and  John 
S.  Hart,  educators  all  now  gone  to  'their  reward. 

In  1875  Mr.  Davis  was  offered  the  position  of  associate  editor  on  The 
Express,  a  daily  of  Lancaster,  Pennsylvania,  which  he  held  until  he  accepted 
a,  similar  position  on  The  Press,  Philadelphia,  then  conducted  by  John  W. 
Farney.  Here  he  remained  during  the  winter  of  1876-1877,  and  in  the 
spring  returned  to  Illinois.  In  August,.  1879,  he  was  married  to  Miss  Maggie 
A.  Wolfersperger,  daughter  of  John  and  Lydia  Wolfersperger,  prosperous 
farmers  of  Jordan  township,  north  of  Sterling.  After  two  years  of  domestic 
happiness  at  Birdwood,  west  of  Emerson,  a  pleasant  rural  retreat,  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  Davis  removed  to  Sterling  in  1881,  where  they  have  since  resided  in  a 
charming  cottage  on  the  banks  of  Rock  river. 

During  his  college  course  Mr.  Davis  was  a  regular  attendant  at  St. 
James'  church,  and  enjoyed  the  earnest  discourses  of  Samuel  Bowman,  after- 
ward bishop  of  Pennsylvania.  On  his  removal  to  Sterling,  the  family  found 
the  Presbyterian  church  most  convenient,  the  pastor,  Rev.  E.  Erskine,  grad- 
uate of  Princeton,  attracting  all  classes  by  his  earnest  manner  and  kindly 
sympathy.  Since  his  marriage,  he  has  accompanied  his  wife  to  the  Lutheran 
church,  was  fourteen  years  superintendent  of  the  Sunday  school,  and  is  now 
teaching  a  Bible  class  of  fifty  men  and  women. 

In  the  spring  of  1890  Mr.  Davis  gratified  a  long  cherished  desire  of  his 
life  by  joining  an  excursion  to  Europe  and  the  Holy  Land,  visiting  Ant- 
werp, Switzerland,  Italy,  Egypt,  Jerusalem,  Paris,  London,  and  Edinburgh. 
On  his  return  he  delivered  some  lectures  on  his  trip,  "Jerusalem  and  the 
Pyramids,"  "A  Sunday  Morning  With  Spurgeon,"  "A  Week  in  London." 

His  tales  are  literary.  Autographs  are  a  hobby,  and  his  collection  of 
poets,  statesmen,  heroes,  divines,  begun  in  1865,  richly  illustrated,  has  few 
equals  in  the  country.  He  is  a  constant  contributor  to  the  press.  The 
Gazette  of  Sterling  is  printing  a  series  of  sketches  on  "Men  and  Women 
I've  Met,"  notable  people  of  a  life-time,  that  has  reached  the  sixtieth  num- 
ber of  the  series.  He  is  a  favorite  writer  for  the  Lutheran  Observer,  Phila- 
delphia. 

The  Whiteside  County  Historical  Society  was  brought  into  being  by  his 
efforts  in  1903,  and  now  has  a  large  and  valuable  collection  of  books,  papers 
and  curios  of  every  name. 

His  letter  writing  has  given  Mr.  Davis  a  peculiar  local  distinction.  He 
has  made  numerous  trips,  short  and  extended,  and  never  fails  to  despatch 
a  daily  bulletin  of  things  as  he  sees  them  to  his  home  papers.  In  this  way, 
people  have  traveled  with  him.  His  letters  from  Europe  and  Egypt,  Colo- 
rado, Washington  and  New  York,  Quebec,  Mexico,  Dakota,  Havana,  Florida., 
New  Orleans,  Chattanooga,  would  fill  several  volumes.  Scarcely  a  day  when 


744  HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY 

at  home  that  he  has  not  a  paragraph  for  the  journals  about  some  current 
topic. 

Two  children  have  blessed  the  union.  John,  after  enjoying  four  years 
at  the  high  school  in  Sterling,  took  four  years  in  civil  engineering  at  Illi- 
nois University,  Champaign,  and  is  now  married  and  engaged  in  his  profes- 
sion in  Chicago.  The  younger  child,  Susanna  Roland,  also  passed  through 
the  high  school  and  is  now  in  her  second  year  of  a  general  classical  course 
at  Oberlin  College,  Ohio. 


JOSEPH  L.  PFUNDSTEIN. 

Joseph  L.  Pfundstein,  who  is  successfully  carrying  on  agricultural  pur- 
suits on  section  16,  Jordan  township,  was  born  in  this  township  on  the  18th 
of  April,  1866,  his  parents  being  Joseph  and  Caroline  (Winkle)  Pfundstein, 
natives  of  Wittenberg,  Germany,  who  emigrated  to  America  in  1854.  The 
father,  whose  birth  occurred  March  4,  1828.  passed  away  March  11,  1901.  On 
his  arrival  in  the  new  world  he  located  in  Harrisville,  Pennsylvania,  where  he 
remained  for  ten  years,  on  the  expiration  of  which  period  he  came  to  Jordan 
township.  Whiteside  county,  Illinois.  This  remained  his  place  of  residence 
until  1898,  when  he  removed  to  Sterling. 

On  the  10th  of  October,  1864,  at  Dixon,  he  enlisted  for  service  in  the 
Union  army  as  a  member  of  Company  A,  Thirty-fourth  Regiment  of  Illi- 
nois Volunteers,  under  Captain  W.  C.  Robinson.  He  was  with  the  army  dur- 
ing the  last  nine  months  of  the  war  and  took  part  in  a  number  of  spirited 
engagements,  including  the  battle  of  Nashville,  Tennessee,  on  the  16th  of 
December,  1864.  In  this  encounter  the  fore  finger  of  his  right  hand  was 
shot  oft  and  he  was  taken  to  a  hospital  at  Jefferson,  Indiana,  where  he  re- 
mained for  ninety  days,  being  subsequently  engaged  as  steward  in  this  hospi- 
tal and  serving  in  that  capacity  until  his  honorable  discharge  on  July  18,  1865. 
He  was  a  member  of  Will  Robinson  Post  and  for  many  years  was  actively 
identified  with  the  West  Jordan  Lutheran  church,  which  he  also  assisted  in 
building,  and  of  which  he  served  as  a  trustee  for  twelve  years.  Moreover,  he 
was  prominent  in  local  political  circles,  serving  as  tax  collector  and  road  com- 
missioner of  the  town  of  Jordan  for  many  years,  while  for  nineteen  years  he 
was  school  director  of  the  Jordan  Center  school.  He  was  widely  recognized 
as  one  of  the  prominent  and  prosperous  agriculturists  of  the  community  and 
at  his  death  left  several  valuable  farms  in  Jordan.  Jovial  in  disposition,  kindly 
in  action  and  straightforward  and  honorable  in  all  the  relations  of  life,  he 
won  the  respect  and  admiration  of  his  fellowmen,  and  when  he  was  called 
to  his  final  rest  the  county  mourned  the  loss  of  one  of  its  honored  pioneers 
and  public  spirited  citizens. 

On  the  24th  of  September,  1859,  at  Culpville,  Pennsylvania,  Joseph 
Pfundstein  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Caroline  Winkle,  by  whom  he  had 
eleven  children,  two  of  whom  died  in  infancy.  Seven  sons  and  two  daughters 
still  survive,  namely :  Thomas,  Joseph  L.,  Frank  and  John,  all  of  whom  are 


HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY  745 

successfully  carrying  on  farming  in  Jordan  township;  Jacob,  a  prominent 
agriculturist  of  Rock  Island  Junction;  Andrew,  now  groceryman  of  Sterling; 
Richard,  residing  in  Sterling;  Mrs.  Jabez  Gilbert,  of  Jordan;  and  Amanda, 
wife  of  William  Zigler,  of  Emerson.  The  father  of  this  family  is  survived 
by  two  brothers  and  two  sisters:  Thomas,  of  Sterling;  George,  who  resides  in 
Erie;  Mrs.  J.  G.  Frank,  living  in  Jordan;  and  Miss  Anna  Pfundstein,  who 
makes  her  home  in  Germany. 

Joseph  L.  Pfundstein  of  this  review  pursued  his  education  in  the  com- 
mon schools  and  when  he  had  attained  the  age  of  nineteen  years  began  working 
in  a  creamery,  being  thus  employed  for  thirteen  years.  On  the  expiration  of 
that  period  he  took  up  farming  a.nd  has  since  been  successfully  engaged  in 
this  line  of  activity,  being  now  the  owner  of  one  hundred  and  eighty-two 
acres  of  land  on  section  16,  Jordan  township,  which  he  has  cultivated  and 
improved  until  it  is  now  one  of  the  model  farms  of  the  locality. 

On  the  9th  of  February,  1897,  Joseph  L.  Pfundstein  was  joined  in  wed- 
lock to  Miss  Barbara  Woessner,  a  daughter  of  Mathias  and  Christina  (Hau- 
breaur)  Woessner,  both  natives  of  Germany,  where  they  still  reside,  the 
father  being  a  shoemaker.  Their  daughter,  Mrs.  Pfundstein,  came  to  the 
United  States  in  1892,  and  her  brothers  and  sisters  are  as  follows:  Mathias, 
living  on  a  farm  in  Whiteside  county ;  John,  also  an  agriculturist  of  this  coun- 
ty; Christina,  who  resides  in  Germany;  Will,  likewise  a  farmer  of  Whiteside 
county;  and  Dora  Schick. 

In  the  county  where  his  entire  life  has  been  passed  Joseph  L.  Pfundstein 
is  well  and  favorably  known,  having  the  warm  esteem  and  confidence  of  all 
with  whom  he  has  come  in  contact  by  reason  of  his  genuine  personal  worth 
and  unfaltering  integrity.  He  is  a  member  of  the  West  Jordan  Lutheran 
church  and  by  his  ballot  supports  the  republican  party.  He  has  served  as  as- 
sessor of  Jordan  township  for  two  years  and  school  director  for  six  years, 
holding  the  latter  office  at  the  present  time. 


FRANK  DETWEILER. 

Frank  Detweiler,  who  carries  on  general  farming  on  section  15,  Jordan 
township,  was  born  on  the  old  family  homestead  in  that  township,  May  5, 
1870,  his  parents  being  Henry  M.  and  Magdalena  (Detweiler)  Detweiler,  both 
of  whom  were  natives  of  Pennsylvania. 

Frank  Detweiler  attended  the  common  schools,  spending  his  boyhood 
days  under  the  parental  roof,  and  when  not  busy  with  his  text-books  worked 
iu  the  fields,  assisting  his  father  in  the  care  and  improvement  of  the  property. 
He  remained  at  home  until  twenty-four  years  of  age  and  then  started  out  in 
life  on  his  own  account,  beginning  the  operation  of  the  farm  upon  which  he 
now  resides. 

He  was  married  on  the  6th  of  June,  1900,  to  Miss  Edith  Elizabeth  Eshle- 
man,  a  daughter  of  Albert  and  Mary  (Rhoades)  Eshleman,  who  were  natives 
of  Lancaster  county,  Pennsylvania.  They  came  to  Whiteside  county  in  1879 


746  HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY 

and  have  resided  here  continuously  since,  with  the  exception  of  a  few  years 
passed  in  the  east.  They  are  now  residents  of  Sterling  township.  Unto  Mr. 
and  Mrs.  Detweiler  have  been  born  three  children — Fay  Everett,  Ethel  Marie 
and  Harold  Albert. 

The  parents  are  well  known  in  the  community,  where  they  have  a  circle 
of  warm  and  loyal  friends.  Mr.  Detweiler  gives  his  political  allegiance  to  the 
republican  party,  but  is  not  an  official  aspirant,  preferring  to  concentrate 
his  energies  upon  his  business  affairs  rather  than  seek  office.  He  now  has  the 
management  of  the  old  homestead  farm  of  two  hundred  and  fifteen  acres  of 
rich  and  productive  land  and  in  addition  to  the  cultivation  of  the  fields  and 
the  production  of  the  cereals  best  adapted  to  soil  and  climate  he  likewise  raises 
stock  and  also  engages  in  dairying,  and  in  his  business  is  meeting  with  suc- 
cess. 


DANIEL  B.  KENWOOD. 

Daniel  B.  Henvvood,  one  of  the  venerable  citizens  of  Erie,  was  born  July 
22,  1824,  probably  in  Harrisburg,  Pennsylvania.  He  has  resided  in  White- 
side  county  from  the  pioneer  epoch  in  its  history,  and  has  been  closely  asso- 
ciated with  its  business  development  and  substantial  progress.  He  was  only 
a  year  old  when  his  parents  removed  to  Bucyrus,  Ohio,  and  soon  afterward 
the  family  home  was  established  in  Huron  county,  Ohio,  where  they  lived 
for  seven  years.  The  parents  were  Peter  and  Sarah  (Shapley)  Henwood. 
The  father,  a  native  of  Germany,  died  in  Bucyrus,  Ohio,  when  his  son  Daniel 
was  but  four  years  of  age,  while  the  mother  spent  her  last  days  in  Angola, 
Indiana.  He  was  a  blacksmith  by  trade,  and  there  seemed  nothing  that  he 
could  not  make  out  of  steel,  even  to  a  gun.  He  learned  the  trade  in  Phila- 
delphia, serving  a  seven  years'  apprenticeship,  and  became  an  expert  in  his 
line.  He  was  twice  married,  and  by  his  first  marriage  had  one  son,  William 
Henvvood.  After  losing  his  first  wife  he  was  married  again  in  Pennsylvania, 
and  by  that  union  there  were  five  sons  and  three  daughters.  All  of  the  sons 
of  William  Henwood  served  under  General  Sherman  in  the  Civil  war,  and  the 
daughters  carried  on  the  home  farm  while  their  brothers  were  at  the  front. 
They  lost  several  horses  when  General  Lee  made  his  raid  into  Pennsylvania. 
The  mother  was  also  married  twice,  her  first  husband  being  William  Jackson, 
and  their  children  were  David,  Jerusha,  Rufus  and  James.  By  the  second 
marriage  of  Peter  Henwood  and  Sarah  Shapley  there  were  three  children, 
Daniel,  Peter  and  Thomas,  but  the  subject  of  this  review  is  the  only  one  now 
living.  As  stated,  the  family  lived  in  Huron  county  for  seven  years.  The 
next  removal  took  them  to  Steuben  county,  Indiana,  in  1837,  driving  through 
the  black  swamp.  The  roads  much  of  the  way  were  very  bad  and  they  could 
cover  but  a  mile  or  two  in  a  day.  They  continued  to  reside  in  Steuben 
county,  Indiana,  until  1847,  when  they  started  across  the  country  with  team 
and  wagon  to  Chicago,  and  thence  proceeded  westward,  locating  at  Cascade, 
about  twenty-six  miles  from  Dubuque,  Iowa,  where  Daniel  B.  Henwood  re- 


HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY  747 

mained  for  a  short  time.  For  three  years  he  traveled  through  Illinois  as  a 
peddler  and  never  crossed  a  railroad  track  during  that  time.  He  next  turned 
his  attention  to  the  practice  of  medicine  as  a  nurse,  in  connection  with  Dr. 
Dungan,  of  Galena.  While  thus  engaged  for  three  years  he  spent  part  of  the 
time  in  Springfield,  Illinois,  and  part  in  Peoria  county,  and  in  1851  he  ar- 
rived in  Erie,  where  he  purchased  the  old  car  ferry,  which  operated  where 
the  bridge  now  stands,  continuing  to  conduct  the  ferry  until  the  bridge  was 
built.  He  also  established  a  hardware  and  drug  store  and  carried  on  farming 
interests  in  connection  with  the  operation  of  the  ferry  and  the  conduct  of 
his  store,  devoting  his  attention  to  all  three  lines  of  activity  during  the  period 
of  the  Civil  war.  Recently  he  sold  his  farm  to  his  son.  He  platted  several 
lots,  known  as  the  Kenwood  addition,  comprising  twenty-two  acres  of  land 
in  the  eastern  part  of  the  town,  and  is  thus  contributing  to  the  substantial 
development  and  upbuilding  of  Erie. 

In  June,  1852,  Mr.  llenwood  was  married  to  Miss  Lydia  Coburn,  a  na- 
tive of  New  York,  born  January  4,  1828.  She  came  to  Illinois  with  her 
parents,  Charles  and  Hannah  (Maxwell)  Coburn,  and  for  forty-seven  years 
traveled  life's  journey  with  Mr.  Kenwood  as  his  faithful  companion  and 
helpmate.  They  were  separated  in  death  in  1899,  Mrs.  Henwood  being  called 
from  this  life  on  the  26th  of  January  of  that  year.  Their  children  were  seven 
in  number:  Burton,  who  died  in  childhood;  Butler,  who  conducts  a  dray 
line  in  Erie;  Charles,  who  died  in  infancy;  Ida,  the  wife  of  George  Baker,  of 
Marion,  North  Dakota;  Mary,  who  died  at  the  age  of  three  years;  Carrie, 
the  wife  of  F.  E.  Burridge,  a  druggist  of  Erie;  and  Frank,  of  Texas.  Since 
the  death  of  his  wife,  Mr.  Henwood  has  made  his  home  witK  Mr.  and  Mrs. 
Burridge.  He  is  one  of  the  prominent  and  honored  old  pioneer  settlers  of 
this  county  and  has  attained  the  age  of  eighty-four  years.  He  figures  as  one. 
of  the  characters  in  M.  M.  Kirkman's  story  of  "The  Romans  of  Gilbert 
Holmes."  Mr.  Kirkman,  who  is  the  second  vice-president  of  the  North- 
western Railroad,  was  reared  by  Mr.  Henwood,  becoming  a  member  of  his 
household  at  the  age  of  five  years  and  remaining  with  him  until  he  started 
out  in  life  on  his  own  account.  With  the  early  development  and  progress 
of  the  county  Mr.  Henwood  was  closely  associated  and  for  many  years  figured 
in  its  business  life,  and  is  still  supervising  his  invested  interests.  He  has  an 
extensive  acquaintance  in  Whiteside  county,  and  wherever  known  is  respected 
and  honored;  receiving  the  esteem  and  veneration  which  should  ever  be  ac- 
corded one  who  has  advanced  thus  far  on  the  journey  of  life. 


WILLIAM  T:  GALT. 

William  T.  Gait  is  numbered  among  the  native  sons  of  Sterling  who  have 
found  the  city  as  a  place  of  residence  so  attractive  and  its  business  opportuni- 
ties so  favorable  that  they  have  had  no  desire  to  seek  homes  elsewhere.  Mr. 
Gait  was  born  October  26,  1873,  and  has  spent  his  entire  life  in  Sterling.  He 
attended  the  public  schools,  passing  through  consecutive  grades  and  later  con- 


748  HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY 

tinued  his  education  in  Williston  Seminary  at  East  Hampton,  Massachu- 
setts. He  then  began  writing  life,  fire  and  accident  insurance  and  still  con- 
tinues in  that  line,  also  conducting  a  real-estate  and  loan  business  as  senior 
partner  of  the  firm  of  William  T.  Gait  &  Company,  with  offices  in  the  Gait 
House  block.  He  is  thoroughly  conversant  with  the  opportunities  offered  by 
insurance  protection,  and  as  representative  of  a  number  of  the  old  standard 
companies  he  has  secured  a  large  clientage  in  this  direction.  He  is,  moreover, 
well  known  through  his  operations  in  real  estate  and  in  placing  loans  and  in 
all  departments  of  his  business  has  gained  a  gratifying  patronage. 

On  the  27th  of  January,  1905,  William  T.  Gait  was  married  to  Miss  Re- 
becca S.  Weeks,  a  daughter  of  George  D.  and  Jane  Weeks.  They  have  one 
child,  Elizabeth  Jane  Gait.  The  mother  is  a  member  of  the  Methodist  Epis- 
copal church  and  is  prominent  socially  in  Sterling.  Mr.  Gait  belongs  to  Rock 
River  Lodge,  No.  612,  A.  F.  &  A.  M.;  Sterling  Chapter,  No.  57,  R.  A.  M.; 
Sterling  Commandery,  No.  57,  K.  T. ;  and  Tabula  Temple  of  the  Mystic 
Shrine.  He  resides  at  No.  91 2  West  Fourth  street,  and  in  the  city  where  his 
entire  life  has  been  passed  has  a  wide  and  favorable  acquaintance  that  is 
indicative  of  his  many  commendable  traits  of  character. 


RUSSELL,  BURDSALL  &  WARD  BOLT  &  NUT  COMPANY. 

The  record  of  Rock  Falls'  industrial  development  would  be  incomplete 
without  some  mention  of  the  Russell,  Burdsall  &  Ward  Bolt  &  Nut  Company, 
which  is  conducting  an  important  enterprise  in  this  city,  with  Allen  N.  Brad- 
ford as  manager.  The  original  partners,  Ellwood  Burdsall  and  W'illiam  E. 
Ward,  became  acquainted  in  New  York  City  in  the  winter  of  1844,  and  on  the 
1st  of  October,  1845,  formed  a  partnership  for  the  manufacture  of  screws, 
Mr.  Ward  becoming  impressed  with  the  idea  that  he  could  devise  machines 
for  screw  manufacture  more  economically  than  had  previously  been  done. 
They  rented  a  room  with  power  at  Pemberwick,  Connecticut,  put  in  a  lathe, 
and  Mr.  Ward  started  upon  the  work,  but  the  machine  which  he  brought 
forth  was  not  entirely  successful,  and  when  the  New  England  Screw  Company 
obtained  a  patent  on  the  gimlet-pointed  wood  screw,  which  was  so  superior  to 
the  unpointed  screws  manufactured  by  Russell  &  Ward,  the  latter  firm  aban- 
doned work  of  that  character;  but  from  Thomas  Southard,  a  stove  manu- 
facturer of  New  York  City,  Mr.  Burdsall  received  the  suggestion  that  if  the 
screws  they  manufactured  Avere  fitted  with  nuts  they  would  answer  for  put- 
ting stoves  together.  In  1847  a  third  interest  in  the  business  was  sold  to 
Russell,  Mackay  &  Beach,  and  the  name  changed  to  Russell,  Burdsall  & 
Company.  Mr.  Burdsall  took  some  samples  of  stove  bolts  to  Albany  and 
obtained  some  good  order*.  In  July,  1850,  Mr.  Ward  obtained  a  patent  on 
an  open  die  header,  used  for  making  carriage  and  plow  bolts.  Some  of  these 
were  made  of  square  iron,  while  carriage  bolts  were  made  out  of  round  iron 
and  the  square  under  the  head  upset  into  the  dies.  In  1851  Mr.  Russell  pur- 
chased the  interest  of  both  Mackay  and  Beach,  and  the  name  was  changed 


HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY  749 

to  Russell,  Burdsall  &  Ward.  The  work  of  invention  and  manufacture  were 
carried  steadily  forward,  and  in  1852  Mr.  Ward  obtained  a  patent  on  a  solid 
die  heading,  machine,  which  overcame  the  difficulties  met  with  in  his  old 
roulette  machine.  In  1856  Mr.  Ward  obtained  a  patent  on  a  machine  for 
forging  nuts,  which  was  operated  successfully  till  about  1880.  Throughout 
the  years  changes  were  made  which  introduced  improvements  of  value  in  the 
manufacture  of  screws  and  bolts  and  in  the  nature  of  the  iron  utilized. 

In  1866  the  business  was  re-organized  as  a  joint  stock  corporation,  with 
Mr.  Russell  as  president;  Mr.  Burdsall,  attorney  and  general  agent;  Samuel 
Comly,  secretary  and  treasurer;  and  Mr.  Ward,  manager.  During  the  subse- 
quent prosecution  of  the  business,  various  changes  and  modifications  were 
made  in  the  machines  used.  A  great  many  machines  were  devised  for  au- 
tomatically finishing  the  bolts,  some  of  which  were  eminently  successful,  such 
as  automatically  pointing  and  threading  bolts,  and  shavers  for  shaving  the 
heads  of  carriage  bolts,  and  machinery  for  automatically  tapping  nuts. 

In  1871  William  E.  Ward  became  president  of  the  company,  and  from 
1880  until  1882  was  busy  devising  machinery  for  the  manufacture  of  cold  cut 
nuts  and  finishing  machines  for  tire  bolts,  and  in  the  latter  year  organized 
the  Portchester  Bolt  &  Nut  Company  for  the  manufacture  of  these  goods.  This 
company  was  very  successful  and  its  business  grew  rapidly.  In  1889  Richard 
H.  Burdsall  became  treasurer  of  the  company,  while  Ellwood  Burdsall,  Jr., 
owing  to  the  enfeebled  health  of  Mr.  Ward,  assumed  the  direction  of  the 
mechanical  department.  He  has  also  designed  many  machines  that  are  in 
successful  operation.  In  1900  Mr.  Ward,  the  president,  died,  and  his  son, 
William  L.  Ward,  succeeded  as  president  of  both  companies,  which  were  con- 
solidated April  15,  1901.  under  the  name  of  the  Russell,  Burdsall  &  Ward 
Bolt  &  Nut  Company. 

The  company's  mode  of  manufacture  in  the  beginning  differed  very 
little  from  all  other  carriage  bolt  and  nut  makers  at  that  time.  The  bolts 
were  forged  from  heated  square  bars  of  iron,  mostly  by  hand.  William  E. 
Ward  concluded  that  a  large  saving  in  iron  could  be  made  by  making  a 
.ahort,  stove-in  square  by  heading  bolts  off  the  rod  from  round  iron.  This 
idea  was  put  into  effect,  but  it  was  some  time  before  the  public  adopted  it. 
The  company  was  the  first  to  construct  the  bolt  heading  machine,  on  which 
stove  and  tire  bolts  were  forged  cold,  automatically,  and  with  this  machine 
the  first  stove  bolts  placed  on  the  American  market  were  manufactured. 
Shaved  and  slotted  stove  bolts  and  turned  head  tire  bolts  were  first  offered  to 
the  trade  in  1855.  In  1856  Mr.  Ward  completed  the  first  forged  or  hammer 
nut  machine  ever  invented,  and  although  it  was  not  successful,  he  continued 
his  work  until  he  succeeded  in  perfecting  machines  that  produced  more  than 
thirty  thousand  forged  nuts  daily.  In  1857  the  company  matured  a  new 
and  distinct  process  of  bolt  manufacture,  working  the  iron  cold  and  making 
the  bolts  complete  without  heating  except  for  annealing  before  turning  the 
heads.  The  work  of  perfecting  machines  and  the  output  was  carried  stead- 
ily forward,  and  as  time  passed  new  additional  machines  were  invented  and 
new  buildings  erected,  with  proportional  facilities  as  business  required,  until 
Russell,  Burdsall  &  Ward  became  the  largest  full  square  carriage  bolt  manu- 


750  HISTOKY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY 

faeturers  in  America.  The  company  owns  its  own  peculiar  class  of  machinery 
and  has  introduced  various  improvements,  some  patented  and  others  not, 
which  have  been  especially  useful  in  making  goods  of  which  they  were  for  years 
the  almost  exclusive  producers.  Among  these  was  an  ingeniously  contrived 
machine  for  forming  the  point  and  cutting  the  thread  with  a  chasing  tool,  au- 
tomatically feeding  the  blanks  into  jaws,  which  seized  the  end  bearing  the 
head,  advancing  it  against  a  tool  which  formed  the  point,  the  blank  then 
passing  to  a  chasing  tool  which  cut  the  thread  as  by  an  engine  lathe.  No 
doubt  Mr.  Ward's  greatest  achievement  was  the  invention  of  his  cold  nut 
machine  in  1880,  on  which  he  further  improved  and  secured  a  patent  De- 
cember 7,  1886.  So  successful  was  the  invention  that  the  company  estab- 
lished one  of  the  largest  tire  bolt  trades  in  the  country.  Another  remark- 
able feature  of  the  Russell,  Burdsall  &  Ward  establishment  is  the  perform- 
ance of  nearly  all  branches  of  labor  by  machinery.  Time  has  tested  the 
methods  of  their  inventions  and  their  products  and  placed  the  stamp  of  ap- 
proval upon  all. 


WILLIAM  M.  KILGOUR. 

William  M.  Kilgour,  for  many  years  a  prominent  citizen  of  Whiteside 
county,  was  a  native  of  Cumberland  county,  Pennsylvania,  and  was  a  son  of 
Ezekiel  J.  Kilgour,  who  was  also  born  in  the  Keystone  state  and  engaged  in 
farming  in  Sterling  township,  this  county,  following  his  removal  to  the 
middle  west.  He  was  one  of  the  pioneer  settlers  of  Whiteside  county,  aiding 
in  the  reclamation  of  wild  land  for  the  uses  of  civilization  and  thus  extending 
the  frontier.  He  wedded  Eliza  Graham,  who  died  at  the  age  of  eighty-nine 
years,  while  he,  too,  passed  away  when  well  advanced  in  age.  They  were 
the  parents  of  four  children :  Nancy  Jane,  who  became  the  wife  of  John  B. 
Crawford  and  died  at  Lohrvilte,  Iowa;  William  M.,  of  this  review;  Ezekial 
J.,  who  was  a  soldier  of  the  Civil  war  and  died  in  Nashville,  Tennessee;  and 
Mary  Belle,  who  died  in  Fairbury,  Illinois. 

William  M.  Kilgour  came  with  his  father's  family  to  Sterling  in  1827. 
He  was  then  buf  a  boy  and  the  journey  over  the  mountains  in  a  wagon  and 
across  the  prairies  of  Indiana  and  Illinois  made  a  deep  impression  upon  his 
memory.  The  family  spent  the  first  winter  in  a  little  cabin  on  Elkhorn 
creek,  near  what  is  now  called  Emerson.  They  then  removed  to  the  present 
site  of  Sterling  and  settled  on  the  banks  of  the  Rock 'river,  only  a  few  yards 
from  the  present  residence  of  W.  W.  Davis.  Ezekiel  Kilgour  there  purchased 
a  quarter  section  of  land  and  upon  the  new  farm  William  M.  Kilgour  was 
reared.  Because  of  the  remoteness  from  the  older  centers  of  civilization  the 
family  were  forced  to  endure  many  hardships  and  privations,  but  it  is  a  well- 
known  fact  that  for  thousands  of  stalwart  Americans  the  west  has  been  the 
field  of  opportunity,  not  only  for  business  successes,  but  for  character  develop- 
ment. Upon  the  frontier  a  man  is  not  judged  by  his  ancestry  or  his  posses- 
sions but  by  his  character  and  worth,  and  the  Kilgour  family  had  no  diffi- 
culty in  establishing  their  right  to  rank  with  the  foremost. 


LIBRAHY 

OF  TH£ 

VXIVESSITY  OF  ILL!J!0!C 


HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY  753 

William  M.  Kilgour  aided  in  the  development  of  the  home  farm,  and 
having  arrived  at  mature  years  devoted  the  summer  months  to  general  agri- 
cultural pursuits,  while. in  the  winter  seasons  he  taught  school  at  Linden, 
driving  to  and  from  his  home.  He  regarded  this,  however,  as  an  initial  step 
to  other  professional  labor,  and  becoming  imbued  with  the  desire  to  engage 
in  the  practice  of  law  he  utilized  every  moment  for  the  mastery  of  the  prin- 
ciples of  jurisprudence  and  in  due  course  of  time  was  admitted  to  practice  in 
all  the  courts  of  the  state  at  the  term  of  the  supreme  court  held  in  Ottawa  in 
1856.  Later  he  was  admitted  to  practice  in  the  United  State?  district  and 
circuit  courts  and  in  the  supreme  court  of  the  United  States  at  Washington. 
He  first  opened  a  law  office  in  Sterling,  where  he  remained  continuously  as 
an  active  member  of  the  profession  up  to  the  time  of  his  death,  save  for  the 
period  of  his  service  in  the  Civil  war.  He  became  recognized  as  one  of  the 
ablest  members  of  the  Whiteside  county  bar.  His  devotion  to  his  clients' 
interests  was  proverbial,  but  he  never  forgot  that  he  owed  a  still  higher  alle- 
giance to  the  majesty  of  the  law.  In  the  preparation  of  his  cases  he  was 
thorough  and  in  their  presentation  clear  and  forceful,  his  deductions  follow- 
ing in  logical  sequence,  while  his  citations  of  law  and  precedent  were  almost 
uniformly  correct.  Soon  after  his  admission  to  the  bar  he  was  elected  justice 
of  the  peace  in  Sterling  township  and  filled  that  office  for  four  years,  also 
serving  for  several  terms  as  supervisor. 

As  stated,  the  only  interruption  to  his  practice  came  when  at  the  front 
he  defended  the  Union  cause  as  a  member  of  the  Thirteenth  Illinois  Volun- 
teer Infantry.  He  joined  Company  B  and  was  elected  second  lieutenant. 
He  remained  at  the  front  with  his  regiment  for  a  year,  participating  in  the 
battles  of  Wet  Glaze,  Lion  Creek  and  Springfield,  Missouri,  and  was  then 
compelled  to  resign  on  account  of  illness.  As  soon  as  he  had  recovered  his 
health,  however,  he  re-enlisted  at  the  call  of  the  president  in  1862  for  six 
hundred  thousand  more  troops  and  was  instrumental  in  raising  the  Seventy- 
fifth  Illinois  Volunteer  Regiment.  On  the  organization  of  Company  I  he 
was  elected  its  captain  and  on  the  organization  of  the  regiment  was  chosen 
major,  with  which  rank  he  went  to  the  front.  In  the  battle  of  Perryville, 
Kentucky,  October  8,  1862,  he  sustained  a  gunshot  wound  which  was  so 
serious  that  he  was  carried  from  the  battlefield  to  a  farmhouse  near  by,  where 
he  remained  under  the  care  of  the  army  .surgeon  until  January,  1863.  He 
was  then  taken  to  Louisville,  Kentucky,  and  eventually  returned  home  on 
sick  leave.  But  patriotism  was  dominant  to  all  else  in  his  life  at  that  time 
and  as  soon  as  his  health  permitted  he  rejoined  his  regiment  at  Stephenson, 
Alabama,  and  participated  in  the  battle  of  Chickamauga,  September  19  and 
20,  1863.  There  he  was  taken  prisoner,  but  with  Company  D,  commanded 
by  Captain  Moore,  he  cut  his  way  through  the  enemy's  lines  and  joined  his 
regiment.  He  also  participated  in  the  defense  of  Chattanooga  and  at  one 
time  was  completely  surrounded  by  the  enemy,  all  communication  being  cut 
off.  Later  he  participated  in  the  battle  of  Lookout  Mountain,  November  24, 
1863,  being  in  the  advance  under  General  Hooker.  He  was  in  the  thickest 
of  the  fight  at  Missionary  Ridge,  and  also  met  the  enemy  at  Ringgold  Gap 
and  Taylor's  Ridge,  subsequent  to  which  time  he  was  sent  with  the  detail 


754  HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY 

to  recover  the  Chickamauga  battleground  and  bury  the  dead,  arriving  there 
December  5,  1863.  In  February,  1864,  he  was  under  fire  at  Buzzard's  Roost, 
near  Dalton,  Georgia,  commanding  the  Eightieth  Illinois  Infantry  by  order 
of  General  William  Gross,  who  was  in  command  of  the  brigade.  In  May, 
1864,  he  led  his  troops  in  the  battles  of  Tunnel  Hill,  Rocky  Face  Ridge  and 
Dalton,  followed  by  the  two  days'  battle  of  Resaca  and  the  engagements  in 
June,  1864,  at  Kensington,  Cassville,  Cartersville,  Pumpkin  Vine  Creek,  Pine 
Mountain  and  Kenesaw  Mountain.  On  the  1st  of  July,  1864,  he  commanded 
the  skirmish  line  at  Atlanta,  and  again  on  the  24th  of  August,  when  General 
Sherman  was  marching  to  the  right  and  rear  of  that  place.  At  Jonesboro, 
on  the  30th  of  the  same  month,  he  was  again  under  Confederate  fire  and  at 
Lovejoy  Station,  September  2,  1864.  After  participating  in  the  battle  of 
Lost  Mountain,  Georgia,  he  pursued  the  rebel  general  Hood  to  Gaylesville, 
Alabama,  and  from  that  point  was  sent  in  command  of  a  detail  of  the 
Seventy-fifth  Illinois  through  the  enemy's  country.  He  next  participated  in 
the  battles  of  Athens  and  Dalton,  Georgia;  Pulaski  and  Spring  Hill,  Tennes- 
see, and  was  in  the  sanguinary  conflict  at  Franklin,  Tennessee,  November  30, 
1864,  when  seven  hundred  killed  and  wounded  lay  on  the  Confederate 
battleground.  Later  he  had  charge  of  a  skirmish  line  at  the  battle  of  Nash- 
ville on  the  first  day  and  on  the  second  day  charged  the  first  and  second  lines 
of  the  enemy's  works  with  the  Seventy-fifth  Illinois  and  captured  them.  He 
was  brevetted  colonel  for  gallant  and  meritorious  service  at  Missionary  Ridge 
and  brigadier  general  for  similar  service  at  Atlanta.  On  the  28th  of  July, 
1866,  he  was  appointed  captain  in  the  regular  army  and  was  brevetted  major, 
lieutenant  colonel  and  colonel  in  recognition  of  the  splendid  aid  he  rendered 
his  country  while  with  the  volunteer  army.  His  loyalty  was  ever  above 
question  and  his  own  bravery  inspired  the  men  under  him  to  deeds  of  valor 
and  heroism.  He  was  at  all  times  a  soldierly  man  in  his  presence  and  bear- 
ing and  while  at  the  head  of  his  troops,  although  he  maintained  rigid  dis- 
cipline, he  also  had  the  full  love  and  confidence  of  those  who  served  tinder 
him. 

When  the  war  was  over  Colonel  Kilgour  returned  to  Sterling  and  re- 
sumed the  practice  of  law,  being  accorded  a  large  and  distinctively  repre- 
sentative clientage.  He  also  invested  quite  extensively  in  realty  in  the  city 
and  in  Sterling  township  and  was  otherwise  identified  with  the  business 
interests  of  the  city.  In  matters  of  citizenship  he  ever  stood  for  progress, 
reform  and  improvement  and  was  the  stalwart  champion  of  many  measures 
for  the  general  good.  Honorable  and  upright  in  every  relation  of  life,  he 
was  respected  by  all  who  knew  him  and  in  his  home  community  his  fellow 
townsmen  had  for  him  the  most  sincere  friendship.  He  died  at  San  Jose, 
California,  May  29,  1885,  at  the  age  of  fifty-seven  years,  and  was  survived 
for  only  a  year  by  his  wife,  who  was  then  laid  to  rest  by  his  side  in  a  ceme- 
tery at  San  Jose.  His  death  resulted  from  a  gunshot  wound  which  he  re- 
ceived at  the  battle  of  Perryville,  Kentucky,  October  8,  1862. 

Colonel  Kilgour  married  Miss  Mary  Isabelle  Junkin.  a  native  of  Iowa 
and  a  daughter  of  Judge  Benjamin  Junkin,  who  for  many  years  served  on 
the  bench  in  that  state  and  was  succeeded  by  his  eon  Benjamin.  The  father 


HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY  755 

lived  in  Muscatine  and  was  a  very  prominent  and  influential  resident  of 
Iowa,  leaving  the  impress  of  his  individuality  indelibly  upon  the  judicial  and 
political  history  of  the  state  and  upon  the  substantial  development  of  the 
community.  His  wife,  Mrs.  Susan  Junkin,  lived  to  an  advanced  age.  They 
reared  a  large  family,  of  whom  one  daughter,  Miss  Alice  Junkin,  is  still 
living  in  Muscatine.  In  the  family  of  Colonel  and  Mrs.  Kilgour  were  five 
children,  but  only  three  are  now  living:  Eliza  G.,  the  wife  of  E.  C.  Tracy,  of 
Chicago;  James  Albee,  of  Sterling;  and  William  S.,  who  is  living  in  Roswell, 
New  Mexico. 


GEORGE  D.  GREENOITGH. 

George  D.  Greenough,  junior  partner  of  the  firm  of  Greenough  &  Gait, 
conducting  real  estate  and  insurance  offices  in  the  Gait  House  block,  at  Ster- 
ling, is  a  native  son  of  the  county,  his  birth  having  occurred  at  Rock  Island 
Junction,  just  west  of  Sterling,  on  the  21st  of  April,  1880.  The  Greenough 
family  is  of  English  lineage,  and  at  an  early  period  in  the  colonization  of 
New  England  was  established  in  Boston.  At  one  time  a  member  of  the 
family  owned  Staten  Island.  James  Greenough,  the  grandfather  of  George 
I).  Greenough,  lived  for  many  years  retired  in  Boston  as  a  well-to-do  man,  and 
passed  away  there  when  about  sixty  years  of  age. 

His  son,  James  S.  Greenough,  father  of  our  subject,  was  born  in  Boston 
and  became  a  railroad  man  and  telegraph  operator.  He  arrived  in  Sterling 
when  about  nineteen  or  twenty  years  of  age  and  continued  a  resident  of  the 
city  throughout  the  remainder  of  his  life.  He  was  engaged  in  the  retail  and 
wholesale  oil  business  here  before  the  Standard  Oil  Company  took  the  field, 
and  during  the  last  ten  or  twelve  years  of  his  life  he  lived  retired,  enjoying 
in  well  earned  rest  the  competence  which  he  had  acquired  in  his  active  busi- 
ness career.  Always  fond  of  travel,  he  had  visited  South  America  and  Nova 
Scotia  before  he  was  fourteen  years  of  age.  When  twenty  years  of  age  he 
lost  a  limb  in  a  railroad  accident,  but  this  disaster  seemed  to  prove  no  bar  to 
his  success,  and  for  a  long  period  he  was  accounted  one  of  the  enterprising 
and  energetic  business  men  of  Sterling.  He  died  in  1901,  at  the  age  of  fifty- 
two  years,  and  is  still  survived  by  his  wife,  who  resides  at  No.  411  Avenue  B. 
Mr.  Greenough  was  an  Odd  Fellow  in  his  fraternal  relations,  and  in  religious 
faith  his  wife  was  an  Episcopalian.  She  bore  the  maiden  name  of  Nellie  E. 
Kitel,  and  was  a  daughter  of  George  B.  Kitel,  a  native  of  Vermont.  He  be- 
came connected  with  railroad  interests  and,  following  his  removal  to  Illinois, 
aided  in  the  construction  of  the  Northwestern  Railroad.  He  rode  on  the  first 
engine,  called  the  Old  Pioneer,  that  made  the  first  trip  out  of  Sterling.  For 
some  years  he  served  as  postmaster  of  this  city,  and  was  a  prominent  Mason 
here,  becoming  a  charter  member  of  Rock  River  Lodge,  No.  612,  A.  F.  & 
A.  M.  His  daughter,  Mrs.  Greenough,  was  born  in  this  county.  By  her 
marriage  she  became  the  mother  of  two  daughters:  Fannie  M.,  the  wife  of 
W.  F.  Lipp;  and  Helen  M.,  the  wife  of  J.  F.  Wahl. 


756  HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY 

George  D.  Greenough,  the  only  son  and  the  youngest  member  of  the 
family,  has  been  a  resident  of  Sterling  throughout  his  entire  life,  and  is 
indebted  to  the  public  schools  and  the  old  Wallace  school  for  his  education. 
He  entered  business  circles  in  his  father's  office,  and  afterward  embarked  in 
the  real-estate  and  insurance  business,  admitting  Frank  Gait  to  a  partner- 
ship in  1905,  under  the  firm  style  of  Greenough  &  Gait.  They  now  have 
many  clients  and  are  conducting  a  business  which  in  volume  and  importance 
makes  them  leading  representatives  of  their  line  in  Whiteside  county. 

On  the  15th  of  August,  1902,  George  D.  Greenough  was  married  to  Miss 
Evelyn  B.  Coe,  a  daughter  of  Mark  I;,  and  Julia  A.  (Gait)  Coe.  Mrs.  Green- 
ough Is  a  member  of  the  Presbyterian  church,  while  Mr.  Greenough  is  a 
communicant  of  the  Episcopal  church.  He  also  affiliates  with  Rock  River 
Lodge,  No.  612,  A.  F.  &  A.  M.,  and  in  politics  is  a  republican,  who,  though 
never  seeking  office  for  himself,  gives  his  influence  on  the  side  of  progress 
and  reform,  as  so  many  business  men  of  today  are  doing — this  constituting 
the  most  hopeful  political  sign  of  the  period.  He  resides  at  No.  409  Avenue 
B,  where,  in  1906,  he  erected  a  beautiful  home,  which  architecturally  is  an 
adornment  to  the  city,  while  its  gracious  hospitality  makes  it  the  center  of  a 
cultured  society  circle. 


BARTHOLOMEW  KNISKERN. 

Bartholomew  Kniskern,  one  of  the  early  settlers  of  Whiteside  county, 
who  has  now  passed  away,  was  born  in  Fultonham,  Schoharie  county,  New 
York,  May  22,  1823.  His  parents,  Peter  and  Nancy  (Vrooman)  Kniskern, 
were  likewise  natives  of  Fultonham,  where  they  spent  their  entire  lives,  the 
father  dying  at  the  age  of  sixty  years,  while  the  mother  passed  away  at  the 
.age  of  seventy-nine.  As  the  name  indicates,  the  family  is  of  German  lineage. 
Unto  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Peter  Kniskern  were  born  five  daughters  and  two  sons. 
Of  this  family  Bartholomew,  reared  under  the  parental  roof,  remained  a 
resident  of  his  native  village  until  1865,  when  the  opportunities  of  the  west 
drew  him  to  Illinois,  and  with  his  family  he  came  to  Lyndon. 

Mr.  Kuiskern  had  been  married  in  the  east  to  Miss  Caroline  Haynes, 
who  was  born  in  Fultonham,  June  16,  1820.  On  the  journey  westward  they 
proceeded  by  rail  to  Morrison  over  the  Northwestern  Railroad,  which  was 
then  the  only  line  in  Whiteside  county,  and  from  that  town  they  continued 
on  their  way  by  wagon  to  Lyndon.  The  father  purchased  a  farm  of  eighty 
acres  on  the  open  prairie  on  section  17,  Lyndon  township,  and  at  once  began 
to  cultivate  and  improve  the  place.  As  the  years  passed  he  transformed  it 
into  a  valuable  property,  erecting  thereon  the  present  buildings,  setting  out 
fine  fruit  trees,  bringing  the  fields  under  a  high  state  of  cultivation,  and  other- 
wise carrying  on  the  work  of  agricultural  development  up  to  the  time  of  his 
death.  In  addition  to  producing  wheat,  corn  and  other  cereals  usually  culti- 
vated on  Illinois  farms,  he  likewise  raised  broom  corn,  as  he  had  done  in  New 
York,  and  made  and  sold  brooms  throughout  this  and  adjoining  counties. 


HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY  757 

In  New  York  he  also  had  a  hop  yard  and  employed  many  hop  pickers.  He 
was  a  most  hospitable  man,  and  he  and  his  wife  delighted  in  entertaining 
their  many  friends.  They  had  dishes  sufficient  to  set  a  table  for  sixty  people, 
but  on  one  occasion,  when  the  house  was  struck  by  lightning,  the  greater  part 
of  their  dishes  were  destroyed.  Both  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Kniskern  were  members 
of  the  American  Lutheran  church,  while  living  in  New  York,  and  after  their 
removal  to,  the  west  attended  the  Congregational  church.  They  were  widely 
recognized  as  earnest  Christian  people,  and  enjoyed  in  large  measure  the 
esteem  and  good  will  of  neighbors  and  all  with  whom  they  came  in  contact. 
The  death  of  Mr.  Kniskern  occurred  in  August,  1874,  when  he  was  fifty- 
one  years  of  age.  For  five  years  after  his  death  Mrs.  Kniskern  continued  on 
the  home  farm  which  she  then  rented  and  purchased  a  dwelling  in  the 
village  of  Lyndon,  where  she  continued  to  reside  until  called  to  her  final  rest, 
on  the  8th  of  March,  1907,  when  in  her  eighty-seventh  year.  In  the  family 
of  this  worthy  couple  were  five  children :  Freeman,  a  carpenter  now  living 
in  Lyndon;  John,  who  died  in  his  forty-ninth  year;  Peter,  who  died  at  the 
age  of  fourteen  years;  Henry,  who  passed  away  in  his  forty-eighth  year;  and 
Mrs.  Anna  L.  Bouck,  who  was  born  August  6,  1857,  and  is  the  widow  of 
Albert  Bouck.  They  were  married  in  New  York,  where  she  was  visiting  at 
the  time.  Mr.  Bouck  died  about  sixteen  months  later,  and  his  widow  returned 
to  Lyndon,  where  she  has  since  made  her  home.  For  four  years  she  had  charge 
of  the  postotfice  at  this  place,  her  brother,  John,  having  been  appointed  post- 
master. She  was  also  associated  with  her  brother  in  conducting  the  grocery 
department  of  his  store,  and  after  his  death  she  assumed  the  management  of 
the  dry  goods  department  as  well.  She  has  since  been  conducting  this  gen- 
eral store  for  a  period  of  nine  years,  and  she  and  her  brother  have  been  in 
charge  for  fifteen  years.  Mrs.  Bouck  is  a  lady  of  good  business  ability,  execu- 
tive force  and  displays  keen  discernment  in  the  management  of  her  mercan- 
tile interests.  She  has,  moreover,  attractive  social  qualities  that  have  won 
her  many  friends  here.  By  her  marriage  she  became  the  mother  of  one 
daughter:  Neta,  who  is  now  the  wife  of  G.  D.  Maxfield.  They  have  one 
child,  Mildred  Caryl,  and  reside  with  her  mother,  Mrs.  Bouck. 


THOMAS  A.  DRAIN. 

The  history  of  the  pioneer  settlement  of  Whiteside  county  would  be  in- 
complete without  the  record  of  Thomas  A.  Drain,  who  from  its  earliest  period 
has  been  a  prominent  factor  in  the  substantial  growth  and  improvement  of 
this  section  of  the  state.  Mr.  Drain  is  a  native  of  Kentucky,  his  birth  having 
occurred  on  the  28th  of  November,  1832.  His  parents  were  Joseph  and  Julia 
(Walker)  Drain,  the  former  born  in  Kent,  England,  while  the  birth  of  the 
latter  occurred  in  Virginia.  In  the  winter  of  1832  the  parents  located  in 
McDonough  county,  Illinois,  where  they  made  their  home  for  eleven  years, 
subsequent  to  which  time,  in  1843,  they  took  up  their  abode  in  Warren 
county,  this  state,  where  they  lived  during  the  succeeding  ten  years,  while  in 


758  HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY 

1854  they  established  their  home  in  Whiteside  county.  Here  the  father 
entered  a  tract  of  government  land,  on  which  he  built  a  log  house  containing 
but  one  room,  with  puncheon  floor  and  clapboard  roof,  this  being  the  home 
of  the  family  for  several  years.  Their  family  numbered  five  children,  of 
whom  our  subject  is  the  eldest.  He  has  a  brother,  George  Drain,  who  resides 
in  Henry  county,  Illinois,  while  his  sister  Mary  makes  her  home  in  Kansas. 
The  two  youngest  members  of  the  family  are  deceased.  The  death  of  the 
parents  occurred  in  Whiteside  county,  and  thus  passed  away  two  of  the 
highly  respected  pioneer  settlers  of  this  section  of  the  state. 

Thomas  A.  Drain,  although  born  in  the  old  Blue  Grass  state,  has  spent 
nearly  his  entire  life  in  Illinois,  being  an  infant  at  the  time  of  the  removal 
of  the  family  to  this  state,  and  a  young  man  of  twenty-one  when  he  accom- 
panied the  family  on  their  removal  to  Whiteside  county.  During  the  period 
of  his  boyhood  and  youth  he  assisted  his  father  in  the  work  of  the  fields,  shar- 
ing with  the  other  members  of  the  family  the  hardships  and  trials  that  must 
necessarily  be  met  in  the  establishment  of  a  home  on  the  frontier.  His  edu- 
cation was  acquired  in  the  common  schools,  where  he  gained  a  fair  knowl- 
edge of  the  English  branches.  Upon  attaining  his  majority  he  started  out  in 
life  on  his  own  account,  and'  purchased  forty  acres  of  land  at  a  dollar  and  a 
quarter  per  acre.  He  later  added  an  additional  tract  of  forty  acres,  paying 
for  this  two  dollars  and  a  half  per  acre,  while  still  later  he  bought  forty  acres 
more  at  twenty  cents  per  acre,  this  being  secured  at  an  auction. 

He  first  built  a  small  frame  shanty,  twelve  by  fourteen  feet,  in  which 
he  made  his  home  for  twelve  years,  but  this  home  has  since  been  replaced 
by  a  more  modern  and  pretentious  structure,  and  he  has  also  added  many 
improvements  and  accessories,  so  that  his  place  is  now  a  valuable  property, 
comprising  one  hundred  and  twenty  acres,  from  which  he  derives  a  good 
rental,  while  he  is  now  living  retired  in  Prophetstown.  When  he  located  in 
this  district  the  Indians  were  still  living  here,  while  deer  and  other  wild  game 
were  very  plentiful.  In  1857  he  had  a  ten-acre  field  of  wheat  which  he  was 
compelled  to  watch  in  order  to  keep  the  wild  deer  and  wild  geese  from  de- 
stroying it.  The  nearest  trading  point  was  Peru,  so  that  the  family  was  put 
to  great  inconvenience  in  order  to  market  their  products  and  make  their 
purchases  of  provisions  and  other  necessities  of  life. 

In  1858  Mr.  Drain  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Anna  Leavenworth, 
who  was  born  in  Vermont,  but  came  to  Illinois  at  a  very  early  day,  she  being 
one  of  a  family  of  five  children.  By  her  marriage  she  became  the  mother  of 
six  children,  as  follows:  Julia;  Carrie;  Herbert,  deceased;  Sadie,  who  has 
also  passed  away;  and  Matie  and  Grace,  twins.  The  wife  and  mother  died 
in  1900,  and  thus  passed  away  one  of  the  highly  esteemed  women  of  White- 
side  county,  for  she  had  gained  many  warm  friends  through  her  good  traits 
of  heart  and  mind. 

Mr.  Drain  gives  his  political  support  to  the  men  and  measures  of  de- 
mocracy, and  has  filled  several  township  offices.  He  is  a  Mason,  belonging 
to  Blue  Lodge,  No.  293,  at  Prophetstown,  and  has  filled  most  of  the  chairs  in 
that  body.  He  is  identified  with  the  society  of  Christian  Scientists.  Fifty- 
four  years  have  come  and  gone  since  Mr.  Drain  arrived  in  Whiteside  county, 


HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY  759 

and  Prophetstown  had  not  then  been  laid  out.  During  the  intervening  period 
he  has  been  a  prominent  factor  in  the  agricultural  development  of  this  sec- 
tion of  the  state,  and  his  memory  goes  back  to  the  time  when  this  section 
was  but  sparsely  settled;  when  the  Indians  were  more  numerous  than  the  white 
race,  and  the  land  had  not  been  reclaimed  for  the  purposes  of  cultivation,  but 
remained  in  the  primitive  condition  in  which  it  came  from  the  hand  of  na- 
ture. In  former  years  he  worked  hard  and  energetically  to  acquire  a  com- 
fortable competence,  and  now,  at  the  advanced  age  of  seventy-six  years,  he  is 
able  to  live  retired  in  a  pleasant  home  in  Prophetstown,  where  he  is  sur- 
rounded by  a  host  of  warm  friends. 


JAMES  ST.  JOHN  GREENOUGH. 

James  St.  John  Greenough,  who  by  his  many  friends  is  remembered  as 
an  enterprising  and  thoroughly  reliable  business  man  of  Sterling,  was  born 
in  Boston,  Massachusetts,  on  the  loth  of  March,  1847.  The  ancestral  his- 
tory is  traced  back  to  an  early  period  in  the  settlement  of  the  new  world,  when 
representatives  of  the  name  came  from  Scotland  and  settled  in  Boston,  then  a 
-small  colonial  village.  A.  member  of  the  family  at  one  time  owned  Staten 
Island,  and  several  representatives  of  the  name  served  as  soldiers  of  the 
Revolutionary  war. 

James  St.  John  Greenough  was  a  son  of  James  and  Mary  Greenough,  na- 
tives of  Massachusetts,  in  whose  family  were  five  children,  three  sons  and 
two  daughters,  all  now  deceased.  The  father,  becoming  a  well-to-do  man, 
lived  retired  in  Boston  during  the  latter  part  of  his  life. 

In  the  city  of  his  nativity  Mr.  Greenough  of  this  review  spent  his  boy- 
hood and  youth  to  the  age-  of  nineteen  years  and  benefited  by  the  excellent 
scholastic  training  afforded  by  the  public  schools.  In  the  year  1869  he  ar- 
rived in  Illinois  and  worked  for  the  Chicago  &  Northwestern  Railway  Com- 
pany as  u  brakesman.  He  lost  a  limb  by  the  cars,  and  afterward  became  tele- 
graph operator,  acting  in  that  capacity  for  sixteen  years  at  Rock  Island  Junc- 
tion. On  the  expiration  of  that  period  he  came  to  Sterling,  where  he  con- 
ducted business  as  a  wholesale  and  retail  dealer  in  oil,  securing  a  liberal 
patronage  which  brought  to  him  a  gratifying  financial  return.  On  his  re- 
tirement from  that  field  of  activity  he  engaged  in  the  insurance  business, 
continuing  therein  until  his  last  illness.  In  all  of  his  different  business  re- 
lations he  was  found  reliable  and  trustworthy,  and  the  success  that  he  achieved 
was  attributable  entirely  to  his  own  labors,  as  he  started  out  in  business  life 
empty-handed. 

On  the  17th  of  January,  1877,  Mr.  Greenough  was  married  to  Miss 
Nellie  E.  Kitel,  a  daughter  of  George  B.  and  Amanda  (Wright)  Kitel.  The 
father  was  a  native  of  Massachusetts,  and  the  mother  of  Vermont.  He  was 
reared  in  the  state  of  his  nativity  and  became  a  railroad  man.  Removing 
westward  to  Illinois,  he  settled  at  Sterling  in  the  year  in  which  the  North- 
western Railroad  was  built,  and  taking  a  contract  for  construction  work,  he 


760  HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY 

built  the  line  from  this  point  to  the  Mississippi  river.  He  moved  his  family 
here  on  a  flat  car,  on  which  he  also  shipped  his  hoiLse.  He  continued  in 
railroad  construction  work  until  1883,  when  he  engaged  in  the  oil  business 
ill  Sterling,  continuing  to  operate  in  that  line  until  his  death,  which  occurred 
March  22.  1886,  at  the  age  of  sixty-one  years.  His  widow  still  survives  him 
and  is  well  known  in  this  city,  where  she  has  long  lived.  She  is  a  communi- 
cant of  the  Episcopal  church,  of  which  Mr.  Kitel  was  also  a  member.  He 
was  somewhat  prominent  in  political  circles  and  represented  the  Third  ward 
of  Sterling  as  a  member  of  the  City  Council.  His  father  was  William  Kitelr 
a  native  of  Massachusetts,  who  lived  in  Williamstown,  that  state.  The  ma- 
ternal grandfather  of  Mrs.  Greenough  was  Dorastus  Wright,  a  native  of  Ver- 
mont, who  married  Sophia  Bigelow  Parker,  a  member  of  a  family  of  excel- 
lent record  in  connection  with  the  Revolutionary  war.  Unto  Mr.  and  Mrs. 
George  B.  Kitel  were  born  two  sons  and  a  daughter,  of  whom  Edward  R. 
Kitel  is  now  deceased.  The  other  son,  Andrew  W.  Kitel,  is  a  resident  of  Chi- 
cago. The  daughter,  Mrs.  Greenough,  still  makes  her  home  in  Sterling,  and  by 
her  marriage  became  the  mother  of  three  children :  Helen  M.,  now  the  wife  of 
Frank  Wahl;  George  D.,  who  married  Evelyn  B.  Coe;  and  Fannie  M.,  the 
wife  of  William  F.  Lipp. 

The  death  of  the  husband  and  father  occurred  May  28,  1902,  when  he 
was  fifty-five  years  of  age,  and  to  his  family  more  than  to  all  others  his  loss 
came  with  telling  force.  He  was,  however,  a  valued  resident  of  the  com- 
munity, and  as  a  business  man  and  citizen  was  thoroughly  respected.  He 
belonged  to  Sterling  Lodge,  No.  174,  I.  0.  0.  F.,  and  gave  his  political  alle- 
giance to  the  republican  party. 

Mrs.  Greenough  has  in  her  possession  a  picture  of  the  old  homestead  of 
Commodore  Loring,  which  was  built  in  1760  at  Jamaica  Plain,  Massachu- 
setts, and  was  purchased  in  1784  by  David  Greenough,  the  great-grandfather 
of  her  husband.  She  also  has  a  most  interesting  relic  in  an  old  sideboard 
that  was  made  by  hand,  without  nails  or  screws,  the  lumber  hewn  with  an  ax. 
It  was  brought  from  England  on  the  Mayflower  on  the  memorable  voyage 
in  which  Captain  Standish  was  in  command.  It  has  been  handed  down 
from  one  generation  to  another,  and  in  his  life  time  Mr.  Greenough  refused 
the  sum  of  five  hundred  dollars  for  it,  saying  that  he  would  not  take  five 
thousand.  It  is  a  most  interesting  piece  of  furniture  because  of  its  antiquity 
as  well  as  its  peculiar  construction. 


MILETUS  S.  HEATON. 

Miletus  S.  Heaton  has  now  passed  the  seventy-seventh  milestone  on  life's 
journey  and,  having  retired  from  active  business  cares,  is  now  living  quietly 
in  the  enjoyment  of  well-earned  ease,  deriving  his  income  from  valuable 
property  interests.  He  was  born  in  Jefferson  county,  New  York,  February 
2,  1831,  his  parents  being  Tertius  and  Almira  (Rider)  Heaton,  both  of 
whom  were  natives  of  Vermont.  The  father  was  born  in  Montpelier  and 


OF  THE 
OF  IL 


HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY  763 

carne  of  ancestry  represented  in  the  patriotic  army  in  the  Revolutionary  war. 
He  served  his  country  as  a  soldier  of  the  war  of  1812,  enlisting  from  New 
York.  When  not  engaged  in  military  duty  he  followed  farming  and  won 
a  fair  measure  of  success  for  his  day.  His  life  was  characterized  by  industry 
and  perseverance  and  those  qualities  never  fail  to  bring  a  good  return.  In 
early  manhood  he  wedded  Almira  Rider,  a  sister  of  Horatio  Rider,  who  was 
also  a  soldier  of  the  war  of  1812.  Both  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Heaton  were  devoted 
members  of  the  Methodist  Episcopal  church  and  their  lives  were  in  constant 
harmony  with  their  professions.  The  father  was  a  whig  in  his  political  views 
until  the  organization  of  the  republican  party,  when  he  joined  its  ranks.  His 
death  occurred  in  1878  when  he  had  reached  the  age  of  seventy-eight  years, 
and  his  wife  died  in  1887  at  the  age  of  eighty-two  years.  Their  family  num- 
bered five  children,  but  our  subject  is  the  only  one  now  living.  Phineas  R., 
the  eldest,  was  born  January  20,  1825,  and  died  April  4,  1860;  Orange  G., 
born  October  25,  1828,  died  July  24,  1865 ;  Claudius  B.,  born  February  23, 
1833,  died  May  19,  1841 ;  Dorcas  F.,  born  January  15,  1836,  died  in  De-  ' 
cember,  1898. 

No  event  of  special  important  occurred  to  vary  the  routine  of  farm  life 
for  Miletus  S.  Heaton  in  his  boyhood  days.  He  attended  the  country  schools 
and  from  the  time  of  early  spring  planting  until  crops  were  harvested  in  the 
late  autumn  he  worked  in  the  fields,  soon  becoming  familiar  with  the  best 
methods  of  tilling  the  soil  and  caring  for  the  crops.  He  continued  farming 
in  the  east  until  the  fall  of  1855,  when  he  arrived  in  Whiteside  county, 
Illinois,  and  settled  on  a  farm  five  miles  northeast  of  Morrison  in  Mount 
Pleasant  township.  He  bought  the  first  ticket  sold  in  Chicago  by  the  Chicago 
&  Northwestern  Railroad  from  Chicago  to  Morrison  on  the  8th  day  of  Oc- 
tober, 1855. 

After  reaching  this  county,  Mr.  Heaton  bent  every  energy  toward  the 
development  and  improvement  of  the  farm,  making  it  a  valuable  property, 
the  fields  being  brought  under  a  high  state  of  cultivation,  while  large  crops 
were  annually  gathered.  He  continued  to.  cultivate  and  improve  his  tract 
of  land  of  two  hundred  and  twenty  acres  until  1884,  when  he  came  to  Morri- 
son, but  still  owns  the  farm.  His  property  interests  also  include  two  hundred 
and  sixty  acres  in  Mount  Pleasant  township  and  a  large  tract  of  land,  a  part 
of  which  is  now  the  manufacturing  addition  to  Morrison.  He  has  two  resi- 
dence properties  in  the  city,  one  of  which  he  occupies.  He  wisely  made 
investment  in  property,  securing  some  of  the  rich  farming  land  of  Illinois — 
of  which  there  is  none  better  to  be  found  in  the  whole  world. 

On  the  27th  of  February,  1881,  Mr.  Heaton  married  Miss  Susanna  E. 
Churchill,  a  native  of  Clinton  county,  New  York,  born  October  9,  1830. 
She  belongs  to  a  family  that  was  represented  in  the  revolutionary  war,  and 
on  the  paternal  side  is  of  Scotch  and  the  maternal  side  of  Irish  descent.  Her 
father,  Joseph  Churchill,  was  born  in  Benson,  Vermont,  January  18,  1775, 
and  died  January  25,  1848.  By  occupation  he  was  a  farmer.  He  was  mar- 
ried September  13,  1809,  at  Chazy,  Clinton  county,  New  York,  to  Susanna 
Bailey,  and  soon  after  the  Civil  war  they  removed  to  Mooers  in  the  same 
county,  where  Mr.  Churchill  died.  His  wife  was  born  in  Windsor,  Vermont, 


T64  HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY 

November  1,  1792.  Her  father  died  January  1,  1813,  and  her  mother  Feb- 
ruary 4,  1813,  both  dying  of  fever.  In  1858  Mrs.  Churchill  came  with  her 
family  to  Whiteside  county,  Illinois,  passing  away  here  at  the  home  of  our 
subject,  November  25,  1884.  Her  children  were  as  follows:  Eliza  A.,  born 
October  24,  1810,  died  October  29,  1829;  Calista,  born  September  28,  1812, 
died  November  8,  1833;  Joshua  B.,  born  November  11,  1814,  died  March  6, 
1815;  Benjamin  L.,  born  February  7,  1816,  died  March  14,  18'65,  in  the 
army;  Jeremiah,  born  May  4,  1818,  was  captain  of  a  vessel  on  Lake  Huron 
and  was  drowned  April  17,  1849;  Joseph  B.,  born  June  23,  1820,  was  a 
soldier  of  the  Civil  war  and  died  March  1,  1905;  George  W.,  born  April  10, 
1825,  died  October  7,  1904;  Sylvester  S.,  born  November  6,  1827,  died  June 
26,  1884;  Susanna  E.,  wife  of  our  subject,  is  the  next  of  the  family;  and 
Charles  C.,  born  June  15,  1836,  died  July  22,  1887. 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  Heaton  have  one  daughter,  Nettie  C.,  who  was  born  in 
1868  and  is  now  the  wife  of  William  Boyd,  son  of  John  Boyd,  in  the  employ 
of  the  Libby,  McNeill  &  Libby  milk  concern.  Mrs.  Heaton  belongs  to  the 
Presbyterian  church  and,  like  her  husband,  is  well  known  and  highly  es- 
teemed socially.  His  political  endorsement  is  given  the  republican  party 
and  he  has  held  various  township  offices.  He  does  not  consider  himself 
bound  by  party  ties,  however,  and  voted  on  one  occasion  for  Bryan.  His 
life  has  been  one  of  signal  usefulness  and  activity  and  he  belongs  to  that 
class  of  representative  men  who  do  much  to  uphold  the  political  and  legal 
status  of  the  community  and  to  further  its  substantial  development  along 
other  lines. 


DWIGHT  SUMNER  SPAFFORD. 

Dwight  Sumner  Spafford  is  the  oldest  merchant  in  point  of  continuous 
connection  with  business  interests  in  Whiteside  county,  and  has  won  the  suc- 
cess which  follows  earnest  effort,  close  application  and  honorable  methods. 
He  was  born  in  Bergen,  Genesee  county,  New  York,  in  1834,  and  has,  there- 
fore, long  since  passed  the  scriptural  age  of  three  score  years  and  ten.  In 
spirit  and  interests,  however,  he  seems  yet  in  hi?  prime,  and  his  activity 
equals  that  of  many  a  man  of  much  younger  years.  His  father,  Sumner 
Spafford,  a  native  of  Massachusetts,  was  of  English  ancestry,  and  the  grand- 
father, Jacob  Spafford,  was  a  soldier  of  the  Revolutionary  war.  About  1800 
the  family  removed  westward  to  Bergen,  New  York,  and  there  Jacob  Spafford 
bought  a  farm  in  what  was  known  as  the  Holland  purchase,  where  he  re- 
mained until  his  death,  which  occurred  about  1840.  He  prospered  in  his 
undertakings,  owing  to  his  capable  management  and  diligence,  and  thus 
provided  a  good  living  for  his  family.  He  held  membership  in  the  Presby- 
terian church,  and  his  life  was  actuated  by  high  and  honorable  principles. 
His  son,  Sumner  Spafford,  accompanied  him  on  the  removal  to  the  Empire 
state,  and  throughout  his  life  followed  the  occupation  of  farming,  dying 
upon  the  old  homestead  in  1858.  His  religious  faith  was  that  of  the  Presby- 


HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY  765 

terian  church,  and  his  political  allegiance  was  given  to  the  whig  party  until 
its  dissolution,  when  he  joined  the  ranks  of  the  new  republican  party.  He 
married  Delia  Barber,  who  was  of  French  ancestry,  although  the  family  was 
established  in  America  in  early  days.  Her  father  was  killed  in  one  of  the 
Indian  wars  of  the  country.  Mrs.  Spafford  was  a  devoted  member  of  the 
Presbyterian  church  and  died  in  that  faith  in  1868.  They  were  the  parents 
of  four  children:  Burton  J.,  deceased;  Dwight  S.,  of  this  review;  Kate  D., 
the  widow  of  Thomas  J.  Tone,  who  at  one  time  was  engaged  in  teaching  in 
Cincinnati,  Ohio,  but  was  later  engaged  in  the  grain  business;  and  Jerome 
H.,  a  farmer  of  Bergen,  New  York. 

In  taking  up  the  personal  history  of  Dwight  S.  Spafford,  we  present  to 
our  readers  the  life  record  of  one  who  is  widely  and  favorably  known  in  this 
part  of  the  state.  The  days  of  his  boyhood  and  youth  were  spent  in  the 
usual  manner  of  farm  lads,  and  through  the  summer  months  he  assisted  in 
the  work  of  the  fields,  while  in  the  winter  seasons  he  attended  the  country 
schools.  Ambitious  for  a  more  advanced  education,  he  afterward  became  a 
student  in  the  State  Normal  school  of  Albany,  New  York,  from  which  he 
was  graduated  with  the  class  of  1855.  He  taught  school  at  Greene,  New 
York,  and  at  Equality,  Illinois,  after  going  to  Albany.  In  the  spring  of 
1856  he  came  to  the  west,  settling  at  Equality,  where  he  taught  school  for 
three  years.  In  August,  1859,  he  arrived  in  the  village  of  Morrison,  and  be- 
came identified  with  its  commercial  interests  through  a  partnership  formed 
with  Orren  B.  Crosby,  under  the  firm  style  of  0.  B.  Crosby  &  Company.  This 
relation  was  maintained  for  three  years,  when  Mr.  Crosby  retired  by  selling 
his  interest  to  Mr.  Spafford,  who  since  186'2  has  been  located  in  the  building 
in  which  he  is  now  engaged  in  business,  and  which  he  erected.  No  other 
merchant  of  the  county  has  been  so  long  connected  with  its  trade  interests, 
and  no  one  has  maintained  a  more  unassailable  reputation  for  business  in- 
tegrity and  reliability.  He  has  been  very  successful  owing  to  his  alert,  en- 
terprising spirit,  and  he  is  accounted  one  of  the  representative  merchants  and 
citizens  of  this  part  of  the  state. 

In  1865  Mr.  Spafford  was  married  to  Miss  Anne  E.  Robertson,  who  was 
born  in  Union  Grove  township  and  died  in  1885.  There  were  four  children 
of  that  marriage:  Frank  S.,  who  is  inspector  of  government  surveys  of 
Idaho,  making  his  home  in  Boise,  is  married  and  has  three  children ;  John 
Earl,  who  is  married  and  makes  his  home  in  Leigh,  Nebraska,  where  he  is 
acting  as  cashier  of  the  Maple  Valley  State  Bank;  Roy  R.,  secretary  of  the 
C.  D.  Gallentine  Company,  of  Morrison,  who  is  married  and  has  one  child; 
and  Fred  Dwight,  a  student  in  the  Illinois  University,  at  Champaign.  Mr. 
Spafford  was  again  married  in  1890,  his  second  union  being  with  Alice  Smith, 
a  native  of  Lyons,  Iowa,  and  a  daughter  of  Leander  Smith.  They  have  three 
children:  Leander  Smith,  a  student  of  the  Kentucky  Military  Academy,  at 
Lyndon;  Ruth,  who  is  in  school:  and  Allen,  who  is  likewise  in  school. 

Mr.  Spafford  is  a  prominent  Mason,  having  atttained  the  thirty-second 
degree,  and  is  also  connected  with  the  Shrine.  In  politics  he  is  a  republican, 
recognized  as  one  of  the  stalwart  workers  in  republican  ranks,  and  one  whose 
opinions  carry  weight  and  influence.  He  has  served  as  school  director,  as  a 


766  HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY 

member  of  the  board  of  supervisors,  and  as  president  of  the  board  of  edu- 
cation. Still  higher  political  honors  have  been  accorded  him,  for  he  was 
elected  to  the  thirty-fourth  general  assembly,  and  had  the  distinction  of  being 
One  of  the  memorable  one  hundred  and  three  who  supported  General  Logan 
and  elected  him  to  the  United  States  senate.  He  has  ever  been  a  man  fear- 
less in  support  of  his  honest  convictions  and  of  unswerving  loyalty  to  any 
cause  or  movement  which  he  believes  to  be  right.  He  stands  as  a  man  among 
men,  strong  in  his  honor  and  his  good  name,  strong  in  his  ability  to  plan 
and  perform.  His  life  history  proves  that  success  and  an  untarnished  name 
may  be  won  simultaneously. 


ALBERT  B.  JOHNSON,    . 

Albert  B.  Johnson  resides  on  section  13,  Montmorency  township, -where 
he  is  the  owner  of  a  good  farm  of  -two  hundred  and  forty  acres.  .The  fields 
are  well  tilled  and  as  the  years  have -passed  by>  he  has  gained  substantial 
benefits  from,  his  work.  Born  in  Lee.  county,  Illinois,  on  the  -26th  of  January, 
1873,  he  is  the  second  in-  order  of  birth  in  a  family  of  four  children,-  whose 
parents  were  Bernard  and  Eva  ( Juelfs)  Johnson,  both  of  whom  were  natives 
of  Germany.  They  crossed  the  Atlantic  to  the  new  world  in  1864,  and  from 
the  east  made  their  way  at  once  into  the  interior  of  the  country,  locating  in 
Lee  county,  Illinois,  where  the  father  worked  as  a  farm  hand.  In  that  way 
he  gained  his  start,  and  when  he  had  acquired  a  fair  sum  of  money  he  bought 
a  farm  in  Lee  county,  upon  which  he  lived  for  a  few  years.  After  disposing 
of  that  property  he  bought  land  in  Whiteside  county,  and  for  a  considerable 
period  was -actively  and  successfully  engaged  in  general  agricultural  pursuits. 
At  length  he  retired  from  business  life,  and  is  now  enjoying  well  merited  rest 
in  Rock  Falls.  Unto  him  and  his  wife  were  born  two  sons  and  two  daugh- 
ters: Mamie,  now  the  wife  of  John  Terhune,  a  resident  of  Lee  county,  Illi- 
nois; Albert  B. ;  Effie,  the  wife  of ,  Henry  Erd,  of  Ohio;  and  Fred,  who  is 
living  in  Whiteside  county.  ..." 

Albert  B.  Johnson  was  a  young  man  when  the  parents  removed  to  this 
county,  and  is  indebted  .to  its  public  school  .system  for  the  educational  privi- 
leges he  enjoyed.  .Through  the  periods  of  vacation  and  after  completing  his 
studies  he  worked  upon  the  farm,  being  thus  engaged  until  twenty-seven 
years  of  age.  :He  then  made  preparation  for  having  a  home  of  his  own 
through  his  marriage  to  Miss  Olive  Pettitt,  who  was  born  in. Rock  Falls  in 
1880,  and  is  a  daughter  of  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Nathaniel  Pettitt,  the  former  a  na- 
tive of  Lancaster  county,  Pennsylvania,  and  the  latter  of  Whiteside  county, 
Illinois.  Her  father's  family  numbered  five  .children :  Herbert  R.,  now  of 
Chicago;  Mrs.  Johnson;  Nellie  F.,  and  Ruth,  E.,  both  at  home;  and  one  de- 
ceased. The  parents  are  now  living  in  Chicago.  The  home  of  Mr.  and  Mrs. 
Johnson  has  been  blessed  with  a  son  and  two  daughters:  Loyd  L.,  Florence 
E.  and  Ruth  E. 

For  four  years  after  his  marriage  Albert  B.  Johnson  cultivated  a  tract 
of  rented  land.  Ambitious  to  become  the  owner  of  a  farm,  he  and  his  wife 


HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY  767 

worked  industriously  and  lived  economically,  until  they  at  length  were 
enabled  to  purchase  four  hundred  acres  lying  partly  in  Whiteside  county  and 
partly  in  Lee  county.  Upon  that  place  they  resided  for  a  year,  when  Mr. 
Johnson  sold  the  farm  and  bought  his  present  place,  comprising  two  hundred 
and  forty  acres  on  section  13,  Montmorency  township.  It  has  since  been  his 
home,  and  in  its  neat  and  well  kept  appearance  indicates  the  careful  super- 
vision and  practical  methods  of  the  owner.  The  early  spring  planting  fol- 
lowed by  cultivation  through  the  summer,  results  in  the  gathering  of  good 
harvests  in  the  autumn,  and  for  his  crops  Mr.  Johnson  finds  a  ready  sale  on 
the  market.  He  is  also  engaged  in  raising  and  feeding  stock. 

In  community  affairs  Mr.  Johnson  is  interested,  has  served  as  treasurer 
of  the  board  of  commissioners  and  as  a  member  of  the  board  of  drainage  com- 
missioners, and  endorses  every  movement  that  is  calculated  to  prove  of  gen- 
eral benefit  to  the  community.  Both  he  and  his  wife  attend  and  support  the 
Lutheran  church. 


BURT  A.  STURTEVANT. 

Burt  A.  Sturtevant  is  the  most  extensive  stock  feeder  of  northern  Illinois, 
and  in  his  business  interests  the  public  has  also  profited,  in  that  he  furnished 
an  excellent  market  for  the  stock  raisers  of  this  and  other  localities.  His 
marked  enterprise  and  aptitude  for  successful  management  are  continually 
manifest  in  one  phase  or  another  of  his  successful  career.  Moreover,  he  is  as 
popular  socially  as  he  is  prominent  in  business  circles,  and  thus  indicates  the 
possession  of  qualities  of  geniality,  kindliness  and  consideration  for  others. 

Mr.  Sturtevant  was  born  in  Prophetstown,  July  .31,  1870,  in  the  same 
room  in  which  his  mother's  birth  occurred.  It  is  the  oldest  house  in  the  town, 
and  stands  just  in  the  rear  of  the  Farmers'  National  Bank.  Spending  his 
boyhood  under  the  parental  roof  and  pursuing  his  education  in  the  public 
schools,  at  the  age  of  sixteen  years  Burt  A.  Sturtevant  began  farming  for 
himself  and  early  manifested  those  traits  of  character  and  specific  qualities 
which  in  later  years  have  made  him  a  most  prominent  business  man.  After 
three  years  he  married  and  took  up  his  abode  upon  the  home  farm,  near 
Prophetstown,  there  living  for  twelve  years.  He  then  again  became  a  resi- 
dent of  the  village,  and  built  his  present  fine  home,  which  he  has  occupied 
since  the  10th  of  November,  1899.  The  farm  which  he  owns  consisted  orig- 
inally of  two  hundred  acres,  and  later  he  purchased  another  track  of  two 
hundred  acres.  At  t»ther  times  he  has  extended  the  boundaries  of  his  place 
until  he  now  owns  five  hundred  and  sixty  acres  in  one  body  on  sections  21,  22, 
23  and  26,  Fenton  township.  He  has  erected  all  of  the  buildings  upon  the 
place  with  the  exception  of  the  dwelling,  which  he  rebuilt.  He  now  keeps  a 
tenant  on  the  farm  while  he  is  extensively  engaged  in  feeding  stock.  In  this 
business  he  is  in  partnership  with  his  father,  but  owing  to  his  father's  ill 
health  during  the  last  two  years  almost  the  entire  management  of  the  busi- 
ness has  devolved  upon  the  son.  In  the  year  1907  he  shipped  fifty-one  carloads 


768  HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY 

of  cattle  and  six  carloads  of  hogs,  and  his  business,  exceeding  that  of  all 
others,  he  is  today  the  largest  stock  feeder  in  northern  Illinois.  His  judg- 
ment is  never  amiss  in  determining  the  value  of  cattle,  and  placing  his  stock 
in  excellent  condition,  he  finds  for  them  a  ready  sale  upon  the  market. 

Mr.  Sturtevant  is  a  member  of  the  Masonic  fraternity,  belonging  to  the 
lodge  and  chapter  at  Prophetstown  and  the  Knight  Templar  commandery 
at  Sterling,  being  also  identified  with  the  Mystic  Shrine  at  Eockford,  arid  the 
consistory  at  Freeport,  Illinois,  thus  attaining  the  thirty-second  degree  of  the 
Scottish  rite.  He  is  likewise  a  member  of  the  Knights  of  Pythias  fraternity 
at  Prophetstown,  and  in  his  life  exemplifies  the  beneficent  spirit  upon  which 
these  orders  are  based. 

On  the  27th  of  December,  1888,  Mr.  Sturtevant  was  married  to  Miss 
Mary  J.  Pratt,  whose  birth  occurred  at  Lyndon,  this  county,  August  25,  1864. 
She  is  a  daughter  of  Charles  and  Amelia  (Sharrett)  Pratt,  both  of  whom 
were  of  French  parentage.  The  mother  is  now  living  with  Mr.  and  Mrs. 
Sturtevant,  but  Mr.  Pratt,  having  enlisted  from  Whiteside  county,  died  after 
his  return  from  the  army.  Mrs.  Sturtevant  is  the  eldest  of  four  children,  the 
others  being:  Flora,  now  the  wife  of  Mark  Stowell,  of  Prophetstown;  Wil- 
liam, a  resident  of  Waterloo,  Iowa;  and  Mrs.  Ora  De  Zano,  who  died  at  Port 
Byron,  Illinois.  The  home  of  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Sturtevant  has  been  blessed  with 
two  children :  Hazel  P.,  who  was  born  January  4,  1890,  and  died  March  17, 
1891;  and  Hamlin  A.,  born  November  18,  1905.  The  parents  are  widely 
known  in  thi?  county,  where  they  have  spent  their  entire  lives.  Mr.  Sturte- 
vant is,  indeed,  a  whole-souled  man,  a  good  entertainer  and  a  genial  com- 
panion who  quickly  recognizes  the  humor  of  a  situation,  and  is  equally  ap- 
preciative of  the  good  in  others.  The  attainment  of  wealth  has  never  been 
allowed  to  influence  him  in  his  relations  with  his  fellowmen,  and  his  life 
record  is  an  exemplification  of  the  Emersonial  philosophy  that,  "The  way  to 
win  a  friend  is  to  be  one." 


WILLIAM  H.  BENNETT. 

William  H.  Bennett,  a  distinguished  corporation  lawyer  of  Minneapolis, 
was  at  one  time  a  prominent  member  of  the  WThiteside  county  bar  and  an  in- 
fluential citizen  of-  Sterling.  He  twice  served  as  mayor  of  the  city,  and  in 
many  ways  promoted  its  interests,  leading  to  substantial  improvement  and 
development.  His  friends  are  still  so  numerous  in  the  county  that  the  record 
of  his  life  cannot  fail  to  prove  of  interest  to  many  of  our  readers. 

Mr.  Bennett  was  born  in  Scotland,  Windham  county,  Connecticut,  June 
28,  1843,  an  only  child  of  Samuel  F.  and  Harriet  (Spaulding)  Bennett,  who 
were  natives  of  Connecticut.  The  Bennett  family  was  established  in  America 
in  early  colonial  days,  and  comes  of  English  lineage,  the  first  representatives 
of  the  name  having  settled  at  Ipswich,  Massachusetts.  In  1740  they  went  to 
Connecticut,  and  there  a  farm  was  purchased  in  Windham  county,  which 
has  since  never  been  out  of  the  possession  of  the  Bennett  family,  being  now 
the  property  of  William  H.  Bennett  of  this  review.  The  progenitor  of  the 


HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY  769 

family  in  the  United  States  was  William  Henry  Bennett.  The  grandfather, 
William  Bennett,  was  a  soldier  of  the  Revolutionary  war,  aiding  loyally  in 
winning  independence  for  the  colonies.  He  followed  farming  as  a  life  work 
and  died  at  the  advanced  age  of  ninety-five  years.  His  wife,  Mrs.  Sarah 
(Giddings)  Bennett,  was  of  W'elsh  lineage.  In  their  family  were  five  chil- 
dren, including  Samuel  F.  Bennett,  who  always  followed  farming  as  a  means 
of  livelihood  and  remained  a  resident  of  Connecticut  until  called  to  the  home 
beyond,  in  1889,  when  about  eighty-three  years  of  age.  His  wife  djed  when 
about  thirty-six  years  of  age.  They  were  members  of  the  Congregational  church 
and  were  earnest,  consistent  Christian  people. 

The  maternal  grandfather  of  our  subject  was  Benjamin  Spaulding,  a  na- 
tive of  Connecticut,  who  carried  on  agricultural  pursuits  in  Windham  county. 
He  married  Panielia  Carter,  a  native  of  Canterbury,  Connecticut.  The  Spauld- 
ings  lived  for  many  years  at  Pomfret,  Connecticut,  and  Mrs.  Spaulding 
reached  the  advanced  age  of  ninety-six  years,  while  her  husband  passed  away 
some  years  before.  She  was  his  second  wife,  his  first  union  being  with  a  Miss 
Ingalls,  who  became  the  mother  of  Mrs.  Samuel  F.  Bennett. 

Through  the  period  of  his  boyhood,  youth  and  early  manhood,  William 
H.  Bennett  remained  a  resident  of  the  state  of  his  nativity.  He  was  born  hi 
Scotland,  Connecticut,  but  spent  his  early  life  in  Hampton,  and  liberal  edu- 
cational advantages  were  afforded  him.  He  pursued  his  preparatory  course 
in  the  Philips  Academy,  and  afterward  attended  Yale  College  at  New  Haven, 
from  which  he  was  graduated  in  1866.  He  then  taught  school  for  one  year 
at  Easton,  Connecticut,  after  which  he  became  a  law  student  in  the  Albany 
Law  School,  and  was  admitted  to  the  bar  of  New  York  at  Albany  in  1868. 
He  sought  the  west  as  being  a  more  advantageous  field  for  a  young  profes- 
sional man,  and  the  same  year  came  to  Sterling,  where  he  arrived  in  the 
fall.  Here  he  entered  the  office  of  Frederick  Sackett,  with  whom  he  formed 
a  partnership  under  the  firm  style  of  Sackett  &  Bennett.  Later  Mr.  Sackett 
removed  to  Chicago,  while  Mr.  Bennett  continued  in  practice  in  Sterling,  and 
soon  secured  a  liberal  clientage,  connecting  him  with  much  important  litiga- 
tion tried  in  the  courts  of  the  district.  A  few  years  later  he  formed  a  part- 
nership with  Henry  Green,  and  the  firm  of  Bennett  &  Green  continued  in 
active  practice  until  the  fall  of  1888,  when  Mr.  Bennett  went  to  Minneapolis, 
becoming  a  partner  in  the  firm  of  Koon,  Whelan  &  Bennett.  This  firm  has 
been  connected  with  the  Minneapolis  bar  for  the  past  twenty  years,  and  has  a 
large  and  important  corporation  clientele.  They  are  attorneys  for  the  Minne- 
apolis Street  Railway  Company,  the  Minneapolis,  St.  Paul  &  Sault  Ste.  Marie 
Railway  Company,  the  Pillsbury-Washburn  Flour  Milk  Company,  Limited, 
the  Northwestern  National  Bank,  the  Minneapolis  General  Electric  Company, 
and  a  number  of  other  leading  business  houses  and  corporations  of  that  city. 
Mr.  Bennett  is  well  versed  as  a  general  practitioner  of  law,  but  in  recent 
years  has  confined  his  attention  more  closely  to  the  law  dealing  with  corpora- 
tions, and  never  enters  now  into  criminal  law  practice,  confining  his  attention 
largely  to  his  specialty. 

In  January,  1873,  while  in  Sterling,  Mr.  Bennett  was  married  to  Mis? 
Frances  Green,  a  daughter  of  John  and  Caroline  Green.     They  became  the 


770  HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY 

parents  of  one  child,  Frances.  The  mother  died  in  November,  1873,  and  in 
1876  Mr.  Bennett  wedded  Miss  Kate  Prescott  'Wright,  of  Bridgeport,  Con- 
necticut, a  daughter  of  George  A.  and  Jane  (Prescott)  Wright.  There  were 
two  children  of  the  second  marriage,  Kate  Townsend  and  Jane  Prescott 
Bennett. 

Mrs.  Bennett  is  a  member  of  the  Episcopal  church,  while  Mr.  Bennett  is 
a  Unitarian  in  religious  belief.  In  politics  he  is  a  stalwart  republican,  and 
while  living  in  Sterling  was  twice  elected  mayor  of  the  city.  He  held  the 
office  of  alderman  for  several  terms,  and  was  a  member  of  the  board  of  school 
trustees  of  Sterling  township  for  many  years.  In  the  discharge  of  his  duties 
he  was  prompt  and  capable,  regarding  a  public  office  as  a  public  trust,  and  in 
the  exercise  of  his  official  prerogatives  promoting  the  interests  of  Sterling  in 
no  uncertain  manner.  He  yet  has  many  friends  in  the  city,  who  esteem  him 
as  one  who  contributed  to  its  business  and  municipal  life,  while  his  social 
qualities  endeared  him  to  many  with  whom  he  came  in  contact. 


CHARLES  GRANDISON  CURTIS. 

Charles  Crandison  Curtis,  who  for  many  years  .was  honorably  and  suc- 
cessfully connected  with  agricultural  interests  in  Whiteside  county,  departed 
this  life  on  the  1st  of  May,  1902.  He  was  born  in  Milo,  New  York,  in  1826, 
and  had  therefore  attained  the  seventy-sixth  milestone  on  life's  journey  when 
called  to  the  home  beyond.  His  parents  were  Robert  Y.  and  Lois  (Tor- 
rence)  Curtis,  the  former  a  native  of  New  Hampshire  and  the  latter  of  New 
York.  They  were  married  in  the  Empire  state  and  for  many  years  the 
father  followed  the  profession  of  school  teaching  there.  His  wife  was  a 
member  of  the  Methodist  Episcopal  church  and  both  died  in  New  York. 

In  his  boyhood  days  Charles  G.  Curtis  attended  the  common  schools. 
He  early  became  familiar  with  farm  work  and,  thinking  that  he  would  find 
better  opportunities  for  advancement  in  agricultural  lines  in  the  middle 
west,  he  came  to  Illinois  in  1857  and  for  a  short  time  resided  at  Lyndon.  He 
afterward  engaged  in  the  cultivation  of  a  rented  farm  in  Mount  Pleasant 
township  for  seven  years,  on  the  expiration  of  which  period  he  removed 
south  of  Round  Grove,  where  he  invested  the  capital  that  he  had  saved  from 
his  earnings  in  an  eighty-acre  tract  of  land.  Upon  that  place  he  took  up  his 
abode  and  made  it  his  residence  until  his  death.  .  In  his  farming  operations 
he  so  managed  his  interests  that  he  won  success,  annually  gathering  good 
crops  as  the  reward  of  the  care  and  labor  which  he  bestowed  upon  his  fields. 

In  1855  Mr.  Curtis  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Lucinda  Raplee,  who 
was  born  in  Milo,  New  York,  in  1830,  a  daughter  of  Robert  and  Mima  Flor- 
ence Raplee.  Her  father  was  of  French  extraction  and  was  a  farmer  by 
occupation.  He  came  to  Illinois  about  1858  and  settled  in  Lyndon  town- 
ship, where  he  lived  for  eight  years,  after  which  he  removed  to  Missouri, 
where  his  last  days  were  spent.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Curtis  had  one  child,  Evange- 
line,  who  was  born  in  1857  and  died  in  1884.  She  wa?  the  wife  of  Everett 


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LIBRARY 
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HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY  773 

Fisk,  of  Mount  Pleasant  township,  and  they  had  one  child,  Ethan  B.  Fisk, 
now  in  Clinton,  Iowa. 

Mr.  Curtis  devoted  his  entire  life  to  farming,  and  his  business  record 
was  characterized  by  the  utmost  integrity  as  well  as  industry.  He  was  char- 
itably disposed,  stood  well  among  his  neighbors  and  advocated  many  pro- 
gressive public  measures.  His  many  good  qualities  therefore  gained  for 
him  the  esteem  of  his  fellowmen  and  caused  his  death  to  be  deeply  regretted 
by  those  who  knew  him.  Since  her  husband's  demise  Mrs.  Curtis  has  re- 
moved to  Morrison,  where  she  now  makes  her  home.  She  is  a  member  of 
the  Methodist  Episcopal  church  and  has  many  friends  in  the  city. 


JAMES  W.  ROSS. 

James  W.  Ross,  a  retired  agriculturist  and  one  of  the  leading  citizens  of 
Fulton,  was  born  in  Clarendon,  Rutland  county,  Vermont,  May  25,  1838,  his 
parents  being  Walter  and  Eliza  (Webb)  Ross,  natives  of  Vermont  and  Massa- 
chusetts, respectively.  Members  of  the  Ross  family  emigrated  to  America 
and  settled  in  Massachusetts  in  an  early  day,  while  the  Webbs  came  to  Amer- 
ica from  England  prior  to  the  Revolutionary  war,  likewise  locating  in  Massa- 
chusetts, some  members  of  the  latter  family  serving  in  the  war  for  independ- 
ence. The  paternal  grandparents  of  James  W.  Ross  had  the  following 
children  who  grew  to  maturity,  but  all  of  them  are  now  deceased:  Walter; 
Gary,  of  Michigan;  James;  Volney,  and  Ephriam,  who  were  residents  of 
Vermont;  Phoebe,  who  was  the  wife  of  John  White,  of  .Vermont;  and  Mercy, 
the  wife  of  William  Potter,  likewise  of  the  Green  Mountain  state.  Walter 
Ross,  the  father  of  our  subject,  filled  various  official  positions  in  his  native 
town,  and  twice  represented  his  county  in  the  state  legislature.  His  death 
occurred  in  1871,  when  he  had  attained  the  age  of  seventy-one  years,  while 
his  -wife  passed  away  in  1874,  when  sixty-nine  years  of  age.  Their  family 
numbered  nine  children :  Catherine,  deceased,  who  was  the  wife  of  M.  B. 
Brown,  of  Vermont;  Melvina.  the  deceased  wife  of  Leo  McDonough,  of  Mc- 
Donough  county,  Illinois ;  Loantha,  deceased,  who  was  the  wife  of  R.  R.  Kins- 
man, who  has  also  passed  away;  Luceba,  the  deceased  wife  of  L.  G.  Kingsley; 
James  W.,  of  this  review;  John  W.,  of  Rutland,  Vermont;  Aldis  D.  L.,  who 
likewise  resided  in  Rutland,  Vermont,  but  has  now  passed  away;  George  W., 
of  Vergennes,  Vermont ;  and  Elbridge  W.,  deceased. 

James  W.  Ross  attended  the  common  schools  of  his  native  state,  and 
though  he  received  but  a  limited  education  in  early  life,  he  has  since  be- 
come a  well  informed  man  through  reading,  experience  arid  observation.  He 
was  reared  on  the  home  farm  and  remained  under  the  parental  roof  until 
the  outbreak  of  the  Civil  war,  when  he  joined  Company  K,  First  Vermont 
Volunteer  Infantry,  participating  in  the  battle  of  Big  Bethel  with  the  Army 
of  Virginia.  After  the  expiration  of  his  three  months'  term  of  enlistment  he 
was  honorably  discharged  and  returned  to  his  home,  but  in  1863  was  at- 
tached to  the  quartermaster's  staff.  During  the  greater  part  of  the  time  he 


774  HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY 

was  located  at  Pilot  Knob  and  Belleview,  Missouri,  and,  being  captured  on 
September  27,  1864,  was  held  as  a  prisoner  for  a  short  time.  After  being 
paroled  he  returned  to  his  department  and  served  in  the  army  until  June, 
1805,  when  he  was  mustered  out  at  Pilot  Knob,  returning  home  with  a  most 
creditable  military  record. 

On  again  taking  up  the  pursuits  of  civil  life,  he  followed  farming  until 
1871,  when  he  came  to  Illinois,  locating  within  four  miles  of  Fulton,  where 
he  purchased  seventy-six  acres  of  land  at  thirty  dollars  per  acre.  He  met  with 
a  gratifying  measure  of  success  in  his  agricultural  interests,  and  when  op- 
portunity offered  added  one  hundred  and  eighteen  acres  to  his  original  tract. 
By  reason  of  his  well  directed  labor  and  sound  business  judgment  in  the 
conduct  of  his  farming  interests,  he  acquired  the  competence  that  enabled 
him  to  retire  from  active  life  in  1895,  and  he  has  since  resided  in  Fulton,  en- 
joying in  well  earned  rest  the  fruits  of  his  former  toil. 

In  1867  Mr.  Ross  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Harriet  Barney,  of 
Shrewsbury,  Vermont,  a  daughter  of  J.  A.  and  Harriet  (Ewing)  Barney, 
likewise  of  Vermont.  Representatives  of  both  the  Ewing  and  Barney  fami- 
lies came  to  America  in  an  early  day.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Ross  have  two  chil- 
dren: Frances,  the  wife  of  John  S.  Mover,  of  Fulton;  and  Gertrude,  at 
home,  who  is  a  teacher  by  profession. 

Politically,  Mr.  Ross  is  a  republican,  having  cast  his  first  vote  for  Abra- 
ham Lincoln  in  1861.  For  five  years  he  served  as  supervisor  from  Ustick 
township,  his  term  beginning  in  1890,  and  for  six  years,  beginning  in  1896, 
he  served  as  supervisor  from  Fulton  township.  His  long  retention  in  the 
office  is  incontrovertible  proof  of  his  capability  and  fidelity  in  the  discharge 
of  his  duties  and  of  the  trust  reposed  in  him  by  his  fellowmen.  He  has 
long  been  recognized  as  one  of  the  county's  influential  and  enterprising  citi- 
zens, and  it  is  with  pleasure  that  we  present  his  life  record  to  our  readers. 


JOHN  D.  AREY. 

John  D.  Arey,  highly  esteemed  as  a  citizen  and  a  man  of  sterling  integ- 
rity of  character,  has  for  many  years  been  a  resident  of  Whiteside  county,  and 
few,  if  any,  have  more  intimate  knowledge  of  the  events  which  have  shaped 
its  history  and  formulated  its  policy.  He  is  numbered  among  the  old  set- 
tiers  of  Rock  Falls  and' Sterling,  and  now  makes  his  home  in  the  latter  city, 
residing  at  No.  207  Ninth  avenue.  His  birth  occurred  at  South  Wellfleet, 
Oape  Cod,  September  7,  1834.  There  were  two  brothers  of  the  Arey  family 
who  came  from  England  to  America  in  colonial  days  and  settled  in  Maine. 
Reuben  Arey,  the  paternal  grandfather,  was  a  native  of  Massachusetts  and  a 
tanner  by  trade,  following  that  business  through  much  of  his  life.  He  was 
almost  a  centenarian  at  his  death,  and  his  wife  likewise  reached  an  advanced 
age. 

Richard  Arey,  father  of  John  D.  Arey,  was  born  in  Massachusetts,  and  in 
early  manhood  carried  on  merchandising  at  South  Wellfleet.  In  May,  1844, 


HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY  775 

however,  he  came  to  the  middle  Ave.st,  settling  in  what  was  then  Rapid  City, 
now  Rock  Falls,  where  he  followed  farming.  He  became  the  owner  of  one 
hundred  and  sixty  acres  of  land,  nearly  all  of  which  is  now  included  within 
the  city  limits.  He  died  in  1897.  lacking  but  a  month  of  being  eighty-eight 
years  of  age.  He  married  Martha  Davis,  a  daughter  of  Rev.  Timothy  Davis, 
who  was  born  in  Massachusetts  and  became  a  minister  of  the  Congregational 
church,  preaching  in  the  New  England  states.  He  was  twice  married  and  had 
almost  attained  the  age  of  one  hundred  years  when  called  from  this  life.  The 
Davis  family  was  of  Welsh  lineage.  His  daughter,  Mrs.  Arey,  died  in  1852, 
at  the  comparatively  early  age  of  thirty-nine  years.  She  was  a  member  of 
the  Congregational  church,  to  which  Richard  Arey  also  belonged.  After 
the  death  of  his  first  wife  he  was  married  again.  Somewhat  active  in  com- 
munity affairs,  he  held  several  town  offices  and  was  the  first  supervisor  of 
Coloma.  By  his  first  marriage  he  had  eight  children,  five  sons  and  three 
daughters:  John  D. ;  James  C.,  a  resident  of  Rock  Falls;  Catharine  and 
Timothy,  both  deceased;  Richard,  also  living  in  Rock  Falls;  Ezra  W.,  living 
in  Sedalia,  Missouri;  Mary,  the  widow  of  J.  W.  Nims  and  a  resident  of 
De  Smet,  South  Dakota;  and  Martha,  the  wife  of  Merritt  Green,  of  Marshall- 
town,  Iowa. 

John  D.  Arey  spent  the  first  ten  years  of  his  life  in  the  town  of  his  na- 
tivity and  then  came  with  his  parents  to  Whiteside  county,  being  reared  to 
manhood  at  Rock  Falls.  His  education  was  acquired  in  Sterling,  and  for 
two  terms  he  engaged  in  teaching  school,  after  which  he  took  up  surveying, 
which  has  been  his  occupation  continuously  since  1860.  In  this  connection 
he  has  become  widely  known  and  has  done  a  good  business,  being  at  all  times 
a  man  of  enterprise,  industry  and  perseverance. 

On  the  5th  of  July,  1856,  Mr.  Arey  was  married  to  Miss  Mary  E.  Jenkins, 
a  daughter  of  William  and  Abigail  (Brown)  Jenkins,  who  were  natives  of 
Cayuga  county,  New  York.  The  former  was  a  son  of  Joshua  Jenkins,  who 
was  born  in  the  Empire  state  in  1771.  He  enlisted  for  service  in  the  war 
of  1812  and  died  while  at  the  front.  His  wife,  who  bore  the  maiden  name 
of  Remember  Bowen,  was  born  in  1772  and  lived  to  an  advanced  age.  Their 
family  numbered  six  children.  The  maternal  grandfather  of  Mrs.  Arey 
was  Benjamin  Brown,  a  native  of  New  York  and  a  farmer  by  occupation, 
who  died  at  an  advanced  age  in  Cayuga  county.  His  wife,  Mrs.  Abigail 
Brown,  survived  him  for  some  time,  and  was  also  quite  aged  when  called  to 
her  final  rest.  They  were  the  parents  of  five  sons  and  three  daughters.  At  the 
time  of  the  Revolutionary  war  Benjamin  Brown  espoused  the  cause  of  the 
colonists  and  fought  for  the  independence  of  the  nation,  as  did  his  father. 

William  Jenkins,  father  of  Mrs.  Arey,  was  a  contractor  and  builder,  who 
in  the  spring  of  1856  came  to  the  west.  His  wife,  however,  died  that  fall, 
and  he  returned  to  the  state  of  New  York.  Prior  to  this  time  they  had  lived 
for  sixteen  years  in  Lee,  Massachusetts.  Upon  his  return  to  the  Empire  state 
Mr.  Jenkins  settled  in  Genesee  county,  where  he  married  again,  his  second 
union  being  with  Rachel  Weeks,  who  still  survives  him  and  now  lives  in 
Sidney,  his  death  having  occurred  in  1874,  when  he  was  sixty  years  of  age. 
By  his  first  marriage  Mr.  Jenkins  had  two  sons  and  three  daughters,  of  whom 


776  HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY 

three  are  now  living:  Mrs.  Arey;  Edgar,  of  Warwick,  New  York;  and  Mrs. 
Ann  Allen,  of  Auburn,  ,New  York.  By  the  second  marriage  there  were  two 
daughters:  Cornelia,  the  wife  of  Dr.  La  Mott  Day,  of  Sidney,  New  York; 
and  Alta,  the  wife  of  Charles  Randall,  of  Cambridge,  Massachusetts. 

The  home  of  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Arey  was  blessed  with  five  children :  Harriet, 
the  eldest  daughter,  became  the  wife  of  Miles  Standish  Griswold,  who  is  now 
deceased,  and  she  lives  at  home  with  her  parents.  George  is  also  at  home. 
Mabel  is  an  artist,  connected  with  Marshall  Field's  store  in  Chicago.  Edwin 
died  at  the  age  of  twelve  years.  Fred,  living  at  Auburn,  New  York,  is  as- 
sistant superintendent  there  for  the  International  Harvester  Company.  He 
married  Miss  Ethel  Gordon,  and  they  have  two  children,  Miriam  G.  and 
Gordon. 

Mrs.  Arey  is  a  member  of  the  Congregational  church.  Politically  Mr. 
Arey  is  a  republican  and  has  been  prominent  in  the  councils  of  his  party. 
He  was  also  surveyor  of  Whiteside  county  for  six  years,  was  town  clerk  about 
fifteen  years  and  justice  of  the  peace  for  several  terms.  In  these  various 
positions  he  was  found  loyal  to  the  trust  reposed  in  him,  discharging  his 
duties  with  both  capability  and  promptness.  He  spent  about  fifteen  years 
of  his  life  in  Chicago,  as  engineer  and  superintendent  of  the  construction  of 
the  West  Side  boulevards,  returning  to  Sterling  in  1902,  where  he  has  since 
made  his  home.  He  commands  the  respect  af  all  who  know  him,  for  in 
citizenship  and  in  business  he  has  been  found  equally  reliable  and  has, 
moreover,  displayed  those  traits  of  consideration,  kindliness  and  deference 
for  the  opinions  of  others  that  have  gained  for  him  the  warm  friendship  of 
many  with  whom  he  has  been  brought  in  contact.  More  than  six  decades 
have  passed  since  he  arrived  in  this  county,  and  great  have  been  the  changes 
which  have  occurred  since  that  time.  He  has  witnessed  the  development  that 
has  been  carried  forward  along  many  lines,  and  in  his  capacity  of  surveyor 
has  been  closely  associated  with  the  settlement  and  improvement  of  the 
county. 


JOHN  H.  WARD. 

Illinois  is  pre-eminently  an  agricultural  state,  and  the  men  who  have 
been  its  founders  and  upbuilders  have  largely  been  identified  with  farming. 
The  growth  and  progress  of  any  state  depends  not  upon  a  few,  but  upon  the 
loyal  citizenship  of  the  great  majority.  John  II.  Ward  was  one  who,  in  the 
faithful  performance  of  each  day's  duties,  contributed  to  the  general  pros- 
perity and  to  the  upbuilding  of  his  community.  He  was  well  known  for 
about  twenty  years  as  a  successful  agriculturist  and  horse  breeder  of  White- 
side  county,  where  he  carried  on  the  business  up  to  the  time  of  his  death,  on 
the  3d  of  September,  1881. 

He  was  born  in  the  state  of  New  York,  April  23,  1820,  his  parents  being 
Naham  M.  and  Diadena  (Diver)  Ward.  The  Wards  are  of  English  lineage, 
but  are  an  old  New  England  family.  John  H.  Ward  was  the  eldest  of  three 


HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY  777 

children.  His  brother,  Charles  Ward,  died  at  Morrison  in  August,  1896, 
after  a  long  residence  in  this  county.  He  located  in  Mount  Pleasant  town- 
ship in  1864,  and  was  the  owner  of  a  fine  farm  on  section  1.  The  other 
brother.  George  Ward,  spent  some  time  in  this  county,  where  he  located  about 
1860,  and  later  left  Illinois  and  spent  his  last  days  in  the  state  of  New 
York,  where  he  died  about  twenty-seven  years  ago. 

John  H.  Ward  was  reared  in  the  Empire  state,  and  in  early'  manhood 
followed  farming  in  Niagara  county.  On  selling  his  interests  there  he  came 
to  this  county,  in  1862,  and  purchased  eighty  acres,  to  which  he  afterward 
added  two  tracts  of  forty  acres  each  at  later  periods,  thus  becoming  the  owner 
of  one  hundred  and  sixty  acres  of  Illinois'  rich  farming  land.  He  was  a 
successful  business  man  and  agriculturist,  and  in  connection  with  the  tilling 
of  the  soil  for  the  producton  of  crops  he  conducted  a  prosperous  business  as 
a  stockman,  breeding  and  dealing  in  horses.  .  He.  was  widely  known  for  his 
unassailable  integrity  in  business  transactions,  as  well  as  for  the  unfaltering 
industry  which  won  ,him  prosperity. 

Mr.  Ward  was  married  in  DeRuyter,  New  York,  to  Miss  Mary  E.  Bump, 
a  native  of  that  .locality  who,  long  surviving  her  husband,  died  in  this  county 
January  23,  1898,  when  more  than  sixty-six  years  of  age. .  Both  Mr.  and  Mrs. 
Ward  were  highly  esteemed  by  many  friends.  His  political  allegiance  was 
given  to  the  republican  party,  and  he  was  always  loyal  to  its  interests,  though 
never  an  office  seeker.  Since  the  family  was  established  in  this  county,  in 
1862,  the  name  has  ever  been  a  synonym  for  reliability  and  agricultural 
activity  here. 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  Ward  reared  a  family  of  two  sons  and  a  daughter.  John 
F.,  the  eldest,  born  October  26,  1858,  in  Niagara  county,  New  York,  was  but 
four  years  of  age  when  brought  by  his  parents  to  Whiteside  county,  where 
he  acquired  a  common  school  education.  He  has  resided  mainly  on  the 
home  farm,  where  he  is  now  living.  On  the  14th  of  March,  1889,  he  was 
united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Cornelia  E.  Michael,  a  native  of  Columbia  county, 
New  York,  who  was  reared,  however,  in  Wisconsin.  Her  parents  were  Jacob 
and  Jane  (Hornfager)  Michael,  the  former  now  deceased,  while  the  mother 
is  a  resident  of  Iowa  county,  Wisconsin.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  John  F.  Ward  have 
two  sons :  Clark  L.  and  Jay  H.  Mr.  Ward  owns  and  cultivates  one  hundred 
and  sixty  acres  of  finely  improved  land,  and  also  engaged  in  the  raising  and 
feeding  of  stock. 

Mary  A.  Ward,  born  June  6,  1860,  is  the  wife  of  John  Gridley,  a  resident 
farmer  of  Usti'ck  township,  and  they  have  four  children :  Ward,  Mabel,  Guy 
and  John  W.  Further  mention  of  this  family  is  made  on  another  page  of  this 
volume. 

Charles  H.  Ward,  who  was  born  September  10,  1863,  upon  the  home 
farm  in  Mount  Pleasant  township,  has  always  resided  in  this  county. '  He 
mastered  the  elementary  branches  of  learning  in  the  public  schools,  and 
afterward  spent  one  winter  in  Fulton  College.  Determining  to  follow  the 
occupation  of  farming  as  his  life  work,  he  secured  his  present  place,  com- 
prising eighty  acres  of  well  improved  land  on  section  3,  Mount  Pleasant  town- 
ship. He  also  owns  some  timberland  north  of  Morrison,  and  has  met  with 


778  HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY 

well  merited  and  gratifying  success  owing  to  his  well  defined  labor  and  un- 
faltering activity.  On  the  12th  of  April,  1904,  he  wedded  Miss  Irma  Now- 
len,  a  native  of  this  county  and  a  daughter  of  Robert  and  Libbie  (Preston) 
Nowlen,  who  were  early  residents  of  Mount  Pleasant  township,  coming  to 
Illinois  from  New  York.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Charles  H.  Ward  have  two  sons, 
John  M.  and  George  W. 

Politically,  the  brothers  are  republicans,  and  both  are  enterprising  men 
•who  stand  as  worthy  representatives  of  the  farming  interests  of  Whiteside 
county  and  as  respected  members  of  one  of  the  early  families  of  this  part  of 
the  state. 


FRANK  MILLHOUSE. 

Numbered  among  the  energetic  and  progressive  farmers  of  Whiteside 
county  is  Frank  Millhouse,  who  was  born  in  Jordan  township,  in  Novem- 
ber, 1872,  and  is  a  representative  of  one  of  the  early  families  here,  his  parents, 
Jacob  and  Mary  (Eshleman)  Millhouse,  arriving  in  the  year  1857.  The  pa- 
ternal grandparents  were  Arthur  and  Elizabeth  (Hevil)  Millhouse,  who  were 
of  English  descent,  and  at  an  early  day  became  residents  of  Pennsylvania. 
Their  family  numbered  fifteen  children,  Mary,  Jacob,  Elizabeth,  Susan, 
Lydia,  Asher,  Nancy,  John,  Reuben,  Henry,  Euphemia,  Caroline,  Ann, 
Sophia  and  George.  Five  of  this  number  are  now  living,  Asher,  George, 
Reuben,  Henry  and  Jacob. 

Reared  in  the  east,  Jacob  Millhouse,  after  arriving  at  years  of  maturity, 
was  married  in  Lancaster  county,  Pennsylvania,  on  the  20th  of  September, 
1852,  to  Miss  Mary  Eshleman,  a  daughter  of  Jacob  and  Madeline  (Koffman) 
Eshleman.  natives  of  Pennsylvania.  Their  family  numbered  eight  children, 
Elias  K.,  Isaac  H.,  Mary,  Elizabeth,  Hiram,  Isaac,  Nathaniel  and  Jacob,  all 
of  whom  have  passed  away  with  the  exception  of  Mary  and  Elizabeth.  Mr. 
and  Mrs.  Jacob  Millhouse  began  their  domestic  life  in  the  east,  where  they 
resided  until  1857,  when  they  removed  westward  to  Illinois,  settling  in  White- 
side  county  upon  a  farm  which  is  now  the  old  family  homestead.  The  father 
purchased  eighty  acres  of  land  at  twenty-five  dollars  per  acre.  As  the  years 
have  passed  its  value  has  constantly  increased,  until  it  is  now  a  fine  prop- 
erty, owing  to  the  cultivation  that  has  been  bestowed  upon  it,  and  the  many 
improvements  that  have  been  there  placed.  Unto  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Millhouse 
were  born  two  daughters,  while  Frank  Millhouse,  of  this  review,  is  the  only 
son.  His  sister,  Lydia,  became  the  wife  of  Jeremiah  Hess,  and  died  in  1881, 
leaving  three  children,  Ida,  Maggie  and  Lizzie.  Amanda  is  the  wife  of  Aaron 
Hackman,  a  resident  of  Sterling,  and  they  have  two  children,  Franklin  and 
Delilah, 

Frank  Millhouse,  whose  name  introduces  this  record,  is  living  on  the 
old  homestead,  conducting  the  farm  and  caring  for  his  parents  in  the  evening 
of  life.  His  father  and  mother  have  traveled  life's  journey  together  as  man 
and  wife  for  fifty-six  years,  sharing  with  each  other  in  the  joys  and  sorrows, 


HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY  779 

the  adversity  and  prosperity  which  checker  the  careers  of  all.  Looking  back 
across  the  busy  years  they  realize  that  there  is  much  to  be  grateful  for  and 
many  blessings  have  come  to  them.  They  have  witnessed  the  many  marvel- 
ous changes  which  have  occurred  in  Whiteside  county  since  their  arrival  here 
more  than  a  half  century  ago.  That  was  the  day  of  the  ox  teams,  the  scythe 
and  the  cradle,  and  there  was  little  connection  with  the  outside  world.  There 
were  no  large  school  houses,  magnificent  churches  or  costly  residences,  and 
there  was  an  equal  absence  of  telegraphs,  telephones  and  railroads.  In  fact, 
many  evidences  of  pioneer  life  were  still  to  be  seen  here,  but  the  work  of 
civilization  was  being  carried  forward  by  the  early  settlers,  and  the  Millhouse 
family  bore  their  part  in  the  labors  that  have  brought  about  the  modern 
civilization  and  improvement.  The  parents  have  lived  to  see  the  development 
of  towns  and  hamlets  into  thriving  cities  and  villages,  while  the  prairie  has  been 
converted  into  richly  cultivated  farms  which  yield  abundantly  of  the  products 
of  the  soil.  The  rural  free  delivery  now  brings  the  mail  to  their  door  daily, 
and  the  telephone  affords  direct  communication  with  neighbors  and  friends. 

Frank  Millhouse  was  reared  to  the  labors  of  the  farm  and  has  followed 
agriculture  as  a  life  occupation.  As  the  years  have  gone  by  he  has  more  and 
more  largely  relieved  his  father  of  the  work  of  the  fields  until  he  is  now  in 
charge  of  the  home  farm,  which  under  his  care  and  supervision  is  kept  in  a 
high  state  of  cultivation  and  presents  a  most  attractive  and  thrifty  appearance. 

Mr.  Millhouse  was  married  December  19,  1894,  to  Miss  Ida  K.  Hoover, 
a  daughter  of  Amos  and  Barbara  (Groff)  Hoover,  natives  of  Lancaster  county, 
Pennsylvania.  They  came  to  Whiteside  county  at  an  early  day  and  cast  in 
their  lot  with  the  pioneer  settlers.  Unto  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Millhouse  have  been 
born  four  children:  Glenn,  Gladys,  Eva  and  Harry. 

Mr.  Millhouse  votes  with  the  republican  party  and  keeps  well  informed 
on  the  questions  and  issues  of  the  day,  as  every  true  American  citizen  should 
•do,  but  the  honors  and  emoluments  of  office  have  no  attraction  for  him,  as 
he  prefers  to  concentrate  his  energies  upon  his  business  affairs,  which,  care- 
fully directed,  are  bringing  to  him  well  merited  success. 


HENRY  GREEN. 

Henry  Green,  lawyer  and  banker,  was  born  in  Racine  county,  Wiscon- 
sin, May  17,  1846.  In  1850  he  removed  with  his  parents  to  Jo  Daviess  county, 
Illinois,  where  he  continued  to  reside  until  about  twenty  years  of  age.  He 
prepared  for  college  at  Clark  Seminary,  Aurora,  and  at  the  academy  of  North- 
western University,  and  was  graduated  at  Northwestern  University,  Evans- 
ton,  in  1873,  having  taken  the  full  classical  course.  Immediately  after  gradu- 
ating, he  began  the  study  of  law  in  Chicago.  In  February,  1875,  he  removed 
to  Sterling,  Illinois,  continuing  the  study  of  law  in  the  law  office  of  William 
H.  Bennett,  and  was  admitted  to  the  bar  in  September,  1876. 

Upon  admission  to  the  bar,  Mr.  Green  formed  a  partnership  with  Mr. 
Bennett,  under  the  firm  name  of  Bennett  &  Green,  and  continued  the  prac- 


780  HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY 

tice  of  law  in  Sterling  until  July,  1901.  In  October,  1901,  he  was  elected 
cashier  of  the  First  National  Bank  of  Sterling,  to  succeed  William  A.  San- 
born,  who  died  Octoher  24,  1901.  About  a  year  later  he  resigned  on  account 
of  impaired  health,  and  was  succeeded  as  cashier  by  Thomas  S.  McKinney. 
For  several  years  he  passed  the  winters  in  Arizona,  New  Mexico  and  Texas, 
and  in  the  mountains  of  Colorado  and  old  Mexico.  On  the  death  of  Thomas 
S.  McKinney,  which  occurred  July  1,  1905,  he  was  again  elected  cashier  of 
said  bank,  which  office  he  still  holds.  During  the  four  years  which  he  has 
been  cashier,  the  bank  has  had  a  most  successful  career,  and  has  undergone 
extensive  improvements.  An  electric  burglar  alarm  has  been  installed  and 
the  bank  has  been  rebuilt  and  remodeled  throughout.  .  It  is  an  attractive 
structure  architecturally,  with  fine  interior  finishings  and  thoroughly  modern 
equipments^ 

Mr.  Green  was  married  to  Harriet  T.  Brookfield,  June  30,  1881.  They 
have  two  sons,  Charles  H.  and  Howard  S.  The  former  was  graduated  at  the 
Illinois  State  University  in  1903,  as  mechanical  engineer,  and  Howard  is 
now  a  junior  in  the  same  university. 

Mr.  Green  served  as  mayor  of  Sterling  for  one  term,  and  has  been  a 
member  of  Wallace  school  board  for  about  twenty-eight  years.  He  also  has 
been  a  membei  of  the  library  board  for  a  number  of  years,  and  rendered  valu- 
able services  in  the  building  of  the  Carnegie  library  in  Sterling.  In  poli- 
tics Mr.  Green  has  always  been  a  republican,  casting  his  first  vote  for  Ulysses 
S.  Grant  for  president  in  1868. 


DANIEL  LARISH. 

Varied  business  interests  have  claimed  the  time  and  attention  of  Daniel 
Larish,  who  is  connected  with  the  agricultural  life  of  the  county  and  is  also 
a  real-estate  dealer.  Illinois  claims  him  as  a  native  son,  for  his  birth 
occurred  in  Carroll  county,  February  24,  1859.  He  is  the  eldest  of  the 
six  children  of  Rufus  and  Jane  (Weller)  Larish,  natives  of  Pennsylvania 
and  Martinsburg,  West  Virginia,  respectively.  The  Larish  family  comes  of 
French  origin  a.nd  the  grandfather  of  our  subject  served  as  a  soldier  in  the 
war  of  1812. 

Rufus  Larish  was  a  farmer  by  occupation  and  with  his  parents  came 
to  Illinois  in  his  boyhood  days,  the  family  home  being  established  at  Dixon. 
Not  long  afterward  Rufus  Larish  entered  land  in  Fairhaven  township,  Lee 
county,  and  following  the  Civil  war  that  property,  was  sold  and  a  removal 
made  to  Mount  Carroll.  He  subsequently  bought  land  in  Montgomery 
county,  Iowa,  where  he  lived  for  seven  years,  but  in  1874  he  lost  his  prop- 
erly there  and  came  to  Morrison.  He  is  now  an  inmate  of  the  Soldiers' 
Home  at  Quincy,  Illinois,  having  enlisted  in  April,  1861,  in  response  to  the 
call  for  troops  to  preserve  the  Union.  Hardly  had  the  smoke  from  Fort 
Sumter's  guns  cleared  away  when  he  joined  the  army  and  for  three  years 
did  valiant  duty  as  one  of  the  boys  in  blue.  He  became  a  member  of  the 


LIBHAHT 

OF  TH£ 

»'VM,po<?!TY  OF  ILLIKOJf 


HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY  783 

Seventy-fifth  Illinois  Volunteer  Infantry  and  made  an  excellent  record  upon 
the  battlefields  of  the  south.  He  holds  membership  in  the  United  Brethren 
church,  is  a  member  of  the  Grand  Army  of  the  Republic  and  votes  with 
the  republican  party.  The  mother  also  survives  and  is  now  living  in  Ful- 
ton, at  the  age  of  seventy-four  years.  Their  children  are  as  follows:  Daniel, 
of  this  review;  William,  who  is  serving  on  the  night  police  force  at  Fulton; 
Mary,  the  wife  of  Samuel  Machel,  a  mechanic  of  Morrison;  Albert,  who  is 
in  the  state  of  Washington;  Minnie,  of  Fulton,  Illinois;  and  Edward,  who 
is  in  the  employ  of  the  Northwestern  Railroad  Company  and  makes  his 
home  in  Clinton,  Iowa. 

As  a  farmer  boy  Daniel  Larish  attended  the  district  schools  and  later 
enjoyed  the  additional  privilege  of  three  years'  study  in  Mount  Carroll  Sem- 
inary. His  life  has  been  a  busy  and  active  one  and  various  interests  have 
claimed  his  time  and  attention.  He  has  followed  farming  and  real-estate 
dealing  and  in  all  of  his  undertakings  has  been  successful.  He  is  a  man  of 
sound  judgment  and  keen  discrimination  and  rarely  if  ever  makes  a  mis- 
take in  matters  of  business  discernment  or  sagacity. 

In  December,  1880,  was  celebrated  the  marriage  of  Daniel  Larish  and 
Miss  Artie  J.  Hulett,  who  was  born  in  Mount  Pleasant  township,  Whiteside 
county,  in  1861,  her  parents  being  Lyman  A.  and  Lorinda  (Willis)  Hulett, 
both  natives  of  Indiana,  whence  they  came  to  Whiteside  county,  settling  in 
Mount  Pleasant  township,  where  the  father  purchased  land.  He  carried  on 
farming  until  after  the  outbreak  of  the  Civil  war,  when  he  enlisted  for  active 
duty  in  the  field  and  went  to  the  front.  Becoming  ill  with  smallpox,  he 
died  within  two  months  after  his  return  home.  His  political  views  were 
indicated  by  the  stalwart  endorsement  which  he  gave  to  the  republican  party 
at  the  polls.  His  wife  long  survived  him  and  died  in  1904,  at  the  age  of 
sixty-eight  years.  Their  family  numbered  four  children :  George  W.  and 
Eliza  Ann,  deceased;  Mrs.  Larish;  and  Eva  May,  the  wife  of  Edward  Curtis, 
of  Morrison.  Mrs.  Larish  is  a  member  of  the  Methodist  Episcopal  church 
and  has  many  friends  here.  Mr.  Larish  owns  a  fine  residence  property  in 
Morrison  and  other  dwellings  in  the  city  and  has  an  interest  in  farm  lands 
which  yield  him  a  good  annual  income  and  make  him  one  of  the  men  of 
affluence  of  this  locality. 


HARVEY  PACKER. 

Among  the  residents  of  Rock  Falls  who  have  retired  from  active  business 
life  is  numbered  Harvey  Packer,  at  one  rime  numbered  among  the  energetic 
business  men  of  the  city.  He  ha.s  now  passed  the  eightieth  milestone  on  life's 
journey,  his  birth  having  occurred  in  Bennington,  Vermont,  June  22,  1827. 
His  paternal  grandfather  was  the  Rev.  Benjamin  Packer,  a  Baptist  minister, 
who  devoted  his  life  to  his  holy  calling  and  died  in  Vermont  when  well  ad- 
vanced in  years.  The  father.  Benjamin  Packer,  a  native  of  the  Green  Moun- 
tain state,  was  a  millwright  and  an  expert  mechanic.  In  1829  he  removed 


784  HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY 

to  Saratoga  county,  New  York.  In  the  meantime,  however,  he  had  wedded 
Miss  Mary  Johnson,  who  was  usually  called  Polly.  She,  too,  was  a  native  of 
Vermont  and  was  a  daughter  of  Jedediah  Johnson,  who  was  born  in  that 
state  nnd  served  his  country  as  a  soldier  of  the  Revolutionary  war.  He  died 
in  Saratoga  county,  New  York,  at  an  advanced  age.  After  the  removal  of 
the  parents  of  our  subject  to  the  Empire  state  they  remained  residents  of 
Saratoga  county  for  a  number  of  years  and  then  came  to  the  middle  west, 
settling  in  Stark  county,  Illinois,  where  Benjamin  Packer  died  at  the  venerable 
age  of  ninety  years,  his  wife  having  passed  away  only  a  few  years  before.  He 
was  called  out  during  the  war  of  1812  but  engaged  in  no  active  service. 

Harvey  Packer  was  only  about  two  years  of  age  at  the  time  the  family 
removed  to  New  York  and  was  reared  in  the  town  of  Galway,  Saratoga  county, 
upon  the  home  farm,  which  he  assisted  his  father  in  clearing  and  improving 
as  the  years  passed  by.  The  educational  advantages  which  he  received  were 
those  offered  by  the  district  schools.  Attracted  by  the  opportunities  of  the 
growing  west  he  came  to  Stark  county,  Illinois,  in  1851,  the  choice  of  his  des- 
tination being  decided  by  the  fact  that  he  had  a  brother  here.  A  few  months 
later,  however,  he  removed  to  De  Kalb  county,  Illinois,  where  he  carried  on 
farming  for  two  years  and  also  engaged  in  general  merchandising.  He  fur- 
ther extended  the  scope  of  his  activities  by  becoming  manager  of  a  factory  for 
the  manufacture  of  agricultural  implements.  In  1878  he  came  to  Rock  Falls 
and  entered  the  employ  of  the  Keystone  Manufacturing  Company,  engaged  in 
the  manufacture  of  agricultural  implements.  Mr.  Packer  is  a  man  of  marked 
mechanical  ingenuity  and  inventive  ability,  his  research,  investigation  and 
experiment  resulting  in  the  invention  of  a  power  corn  sheller  and  corn  cul- 
tivator, walking  and  riding  plows  and  other  implements,  together  with  farm 
windmills  for  watering  stock.  Thus  he  has  given  to  the  world  many  useful 
devices.  He  also  had  charge  of  the  improvements  made  in  the  Keystone  Man- 
ufacturing Company  but  in  1886  he  sold  his  interest  in  the  business  and  re- 
moved to  Aurora,  where  he  lived  for  twelve  years.  He  then  returned  to  Rock 
Falls,  where  he  has  made  his  home  continuously  to  the  present  time,  and 
during  the  last  period  of  his  residence  here  he  has  lived  retired. 

On  the  9th  of  May,  1849,  occurred  the  marriage  of  Mr.  Packer  and  Miss 
Charlotte  Bass,  a  daughter  of  Samuel  and  Charlotte  (Hagedorn)  Bass,  who 
were  natives  of  the  state  of  New  York,  where  occurred  the  death  of  her  pater- 
nal grandfather.  The  maternal  grandfather  was  Jonathan  Hagedorn,  who  was 
one  of  the  best  known  men  of  Saratoga  county.  He  was  a  thrifty  business 
man  and  accumulated  a  handsome  fortune  for  those  days.  He  married  Abi- 
gal  York,  whose  father  was  a  soldier  of  the  Revolutionary  war.  The  father 
of  Mrs.  Packer  died  in  Fulton  county,  New  York,  in  1841,  at  the  age  of  forty- 
nine  years.  He  served  his  country  as  a  soldier  in  the  war  of  1812.  His  first 
wife  died  in  1835,  at  the  age  of  thirty-five  years,  and  he  afterward  married 
Louisa  Lewis.  By  his  first  marriage  there  were  four  children,  of  whom  two 
are  now  living,  the  brother  of  Mrs.  Packer  being  Jonathan  Bass,  who  resides 
in  Rochester,  New  York,  at  about  the  age  of  ninety  years.  Her  father  by  his 
second  marriage  had  three  children,  two  of  whom  survive:  Frances  Augusta, 
the  wife  of  Hiram  Shipman,  who  is  now  living  in  the  village  of  Northville, 


HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY  785 

Fulton  county,  New  York ;  and  Margaret  Jane,  the  wife  of  Michael  Newton, 
of  Northville. 

Unto  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Packer  were  born  six  children,  namely:  James  H., 
resides  in  Chicago,  where  he  is  identified  with  the  Board  of  Trade.  He  mar- 
ried Eve  Cottrell,  by  whom  he  has  a  son,  Elery.  John  F.  is  engaged  in  the 
livery  business  at  La  Grange,  Illinois.  For  his  first  wife  he  wedded  Josephine 
Cox,  who  died  leaving  two  daughters,  Grace  and  Jessie.  For  his  second  wife 
he  wedded  Mrs.  Emma  Cottrell,  a  sister  of  his  brother  James'  wife.  She  became 
the  mother  of  two  sons,  Fay  and  Harley,  and  is  now  deceased.  Mr.  Packer  was 
married  a  third  time,  this  union  being  with  Mrs.  Idel  Rogers,  by  whom  he  has 
one  son,  Jay.  George  W.  Packer,  the  third  member  of  the  family,  is  deceased. 
He  was  at  one  time  identified  with  the  Keystone  Works,  acting  as  superin- 
tendent of  the  plant  but  afterward  went  to  Chicago,  where  he  was  mechanical 
expert  for  the  Deering  Harvester  Company,  from  whom  he  received  a  salary 
of  six  thousand  dollars  per  year.  He  wedded  Miss  Lydia  Rogers,  by  whom 
he  had  three  children,  Ray,  Pearl  and  Glen.  Frank  Packer  died  at  the 
age  of  eight  months.  Harriet  is  the  wife  of  J.  M.  Bickford,  of  Sterling,  Illi- 
nois. Their  marriage  has  been  blessed  with  three  children,  Viola  May,  Mark 
Dean  and  Charlotte.  Nettie  Viola  Packer  is  the  wife  of  E.  S.  Tucker,  a  resi- 
dent of  Oakland.  California,  by  whom  she  has  three  children,  Dorothy,  Gor- 
don and  Elizabeth  Viola. 

Mr.  Packer  has  long  been  a  stalwart  advocate  of  the  republican  party 
but  has  never  sought  nor  desired  office.  His  wife  belongs  to  the  Baptist  church. 
They  have  now  traveled  life's  journey  together  for  almost  sixty  years,  their 
mutual  love  and  confidence  increasing  as  time  has  passed  by.  In  a  review  of 
the  life  record  of  Mr.  Packer  we  note  that  his  sterling  qualities  have  been  such 
as  are  worthy  of  emulation  and  have  commanded  for  him  uniform  respect. 
He  has  ever  been  true  to  the  trust  reposed  in  him,  whether  in  business  or  in 
private  life,  and  his  industry  and  inventive  genias  have  given  to  the  world 
various  valuable  devices.  His  career  has  indeed  been  of  use  to  his  fellowmen, 
and  his  present  rest  is  well  earned. 


CHARLES  MERRITT  WORTHINGTON. 

The  name  of  Charles  Merritt  Worthington  figures  prominently  on  the 
pages  of  Whiteside  county's  history.  His  birth  was  almost  coincident  with  the 
founding  of  Sterling,  for  he  was  the  first  white  male  child  born  within  the 
borders  of  the  city.  He  lived  to  become  an  active  factor  in  its  business  affairs 
and  public  life  and  his  influence  was  ever  found  on  the  side  of  progress  and 
improvement.  His  personal  qualities,  which  commanded  the  entire  respect 
of  all  who  knew  him,  gained  for  him  lasting  friendships,  so  that  his  memory 
is  enshrined  in  the  hearts  of  the  great  majority  of  those  with  whom  he  came 
in  contact. 

The  Worthington  family,  of  which  the  subject  of  this  review  is  a  repre- 
sentative, was  founded  in  America  in  the  seventeenth  century  by  ancestors 


786  HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY 

who  settled  in  Connecticut.  Thomas  Worthington,  the  grandfather  of  C.  M. 
Worthington,  was  born  in  that  state,  served  his  country  as  a  soldier  of  the 
war  of  1812  and  throughout  his  business  career  engaged  in  merchandising. 
He  married  Elizabeth  Bulkley,  and  both  reached  an  advanced  age.  Their 
family  numbered  six  children  and  the  last  survivor,  Thomas  Worthington; 
passed  away  at  a  recent  date  at  the  very  venerable  age  of  ninety-seven  years. 

Elijah  Worthington,  son  of  Thomas  Worthington,  Sr.,  and  father  of  C. 
M.  Worthington,  was  born  in  the  state  where  his  ancestors  had  lived  from 
colonial  days  but,  departing  from  the  ancestral  home,  became  a  resident  of 
Wilkesbarre,  Pennsylvania,  and  subsequently  removed  westward  to  Illinois 
about  1836.  He  settled  on  the  bank  of  Rock  river  at  a  point  that  is  still  known 
as  Worthington  Place.  He  married  Elizabeth  Merritt,  also  a  native  of  Con- 
necticut arid  a  daughter  of  William  Merritt,  who  was  born  in  the  same  state 
and  was  a  descendant  of  William  Merritt,  of  an  old  English  family,  which  has 
its  branches  in  Connecticut  and  Massachusetts.  The  death  of  Elijah  Worthing- 
ton occurred  in  1839,  when  he  was  about  forty  years  of  age  and  his  widow 
afterward  married  a  Mr.  Goss  and  removed  to  Mount  Carroll,  Illinois. 

It  was  there  that  Charles  Merritt  WTorthington  spent  his  boyhood  days  and 
acquired  his  early  education.  Hi?  father  had  followed  the  occupation  of  farm- 
ing in  connection  with  merchandising  and  had  conducted  the  first  store  in 
Sterling,  so  that  the  family  name  is  inseparably  associated  with  the  history  of 
this  city.  Charles  Merritt  Worthington,  moreover,  is  entitled  to  representation 
in  this  volume  because  of  the  fact  that  he  was  the  first  male  child  born  in 
Sterling,  his  natal  day  being  September  16,  1838.  In  later  years  he  became 
an  active  factor  in  its  business  and  public  life.  He  spent  a  few  years  of  his 
boyhood  in  Mount  Carroll  but  at  the  age  of  fifteen  years  returned  to  Sterling, 
where  he  continued  to  make  his  home  until  called  to  his  final  rest.  He  learned 
the  printer's  trade,  afterward  became  a  journalist  and  owned  and  edited  the 
Sterling  Gazette  for  many  yeare,  making  it  one  of  the  best  papers  published 
in  this  part  of  the  state.  /He  was  a  man  of  clear,  efficient  and  sound  judg- 
ment, never  hesitated  in  forming  his  opinions  and  presenting  his  ideas  through 
the  columns  of  his  paper  with  a  clearness  and  force  that  left  no  doubt  as  to 
his  position  and  always  carried  influence  in  forming  public  opinion.  His 
public  service  was  characterized  by  the  utmost  loyalty  and  devotion  to  the 
duties  which  devolved  upon  him.  He  held  office  under  the  United  States 
government,  serving  as  ganger  at  the  Sterling  distillery  for  four  or  five  years, 
while  for  eight  years  he  was  postmaster  of  the  city. 

Mr.  Worthington  was  married  in  1863  to  Miss  Elizabeth  Page,  of  Ster- 
ling, and  to  them  was  born  a  daughter,  May,  who  became  the  wife  of  Cyrus 
Cass  Collins,  of  River  Forest.  Illinois,  and  died  leaving  a  daughter,  Elizabeth 
M.  Collins,  now  living  in  River  Forest.  In  1865  Mr.  Worthington  wedded 
Miss  Anna  Wadsworth,  of  Dixon,  Illinois,  and  they  had  a  son,  Walter,  now 
of  Dixon.  On  the  16th  of  September,  1900,  Mr.  Worthington  was  united  in 
marriage  to  Miss  Fanny  McCartney,  a  daughter  of  David  and  Elizabeth  Augus- 
ta (Agge)  McCartney,  and  a  lady  of  rare  literary  tastes,  well  known  upon  the 
lecture  platform. 


HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY  787 

Mr.  Worthington's  patriotism  found  tangible  evidence  in  his  valiant 
service  at  the  time  of  the  Civil  war.  He  became  the  first  lieutenant  of  Com- 
pany A,  One  Hundred  and  Fortieth  Illinois  Volunteer  Infantry,  for  one  hun- 
dred days'  service  and  was  reported  by  his  colonel  as  the  bravest  man  in  his 
regiment.  A  prominent  Mason,  he  attained  high  rank  in  the  order,  belong- 
ing to  Rock  River  Lodge,  No.  612,  A.  F.  &  A.  M. ;  Sterling  Chapter,  No.  57, 
R.  A.  M. ;  and  Sterling  Commandery,  No.  57,  K.  T,  while  both  he  and  Mrs 
Worthington  were  members  of  the  Order  of  the  Eastern  Star.  A  man  of  broad 
mind,  of  liberal  culture  and  advanced  ideas,  he  left  the  impress  of  his  in- 
dividuality upon  public  thought  and  action  and  aided  in  molding  the  des- 
tiny and  shaping  the  history  of  the  county  with  which  he  was  so  closely 
identified  through  a  long,  active  and  useful  life. 


NICHOLAS  VOCK. 

Among  the  residents  of  Whiteside  county  of  foreign  birth  who,  loyal  to 
public  interests,  are  today  numbered  among  the  stalwart  American  citizens, 
is  Nicholas  Vock,  a  native  of  Germany,  born  May  26,  18'62.  The  parents  were 
John  and  Anna  Vock,  also  natives  of  Germany.  They  had  a  family  of  nine 
children,  namely:  Nicholas,  the  subject  of  this  review;  Barbara;  Phillip; 
Lizzie;  Margaret,  deceased;  Lawrence;  George,  who  has  also  passed  away; 
George,  the  second  of  the  name;  and  one  who  died  in  infancy. 

Nicholas  Vock  remained  under  the  parental  roof  until  eighteen  years  of 
age,  and  then  came  to  America.  This  country,  with  its  miles  upon  miles  of 
broad  prairie,  its  rich  mining  districts  and  great  forest  tracts,  has  been  the 
land  of  opportunity  for  thousands  of  people  who  have  come  from  the  old 
world,  and,  moreover,  it  is  the  land  of  opportunity  for  character  development 
as  well,  where  the  individual  is  not  hampered  by  caste  or  class,  but  makes  his 
way  by  reason  of  real  personal  merit.  After  landing  on  eastern  shores  Mr. 
Vock  continued  his  journey  into  the  interior  of  the  country  until  he  reached 
Whiteside  county.  Here  he  began  working  by  the  month,  and  that  he  was 
faithful,  reliable  and  capable  is  indicated  by  the  fact  that  he  was  employed 
by  one  man  for  eight  years.  He  then  married  and  began  farming  on  his 
own  account,  cultivating  a  tract  of  rented  land  for  six  years,  during  which 
time  he  saved  from  the  proceeds  of  his  sales  of  crops  a  sufficient  sum  to  enable 
him  to  purchase  a  farm  in  Whiteside  county.  He  then  lived  upon  his  orig- 
inal place  for  seven  years,  when  he  sold  that  property  and  bought  two  hun- 
dred acres  of  land  on  sections  1  and  2,  Montmorency  township,  whereon  he 
took  up  his  abode  in  1902.  The  fields  have  been  brought  under  a  high  state 
of  cultivation  and  good  farm  machinery  is  used  in  carrying  on  the  work. 
He  also  raises  and  feeds  stock,  and  this  adds  materially  to  his  annual  income. 

In  1889  Mr.  Vock  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Sabine  Billinger,  who 
was  born  in  Sterling  in  1864,  a  daughter  of  John  and  Johanna  (Reichet) 
Billinger,  both  of  whom  were  natives  of  Germany.  They  came  to  America 
in  1858,  the  father  working  here  as  a  laborer.  He  died  in  the  year  1895,  and 


788  HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY 

the  mother,  who  still  survives,  now  makes  her  home  with  a  daughter  in  South 
Dakota.    Mrs.  Vock  was  one  of  a  family  of  five  children,  and  by  her  marriage 
has  become  the  mother  of  ten  children:     Edward,  Clara,  Carl,  Frances,  Eva,. 
Marie,  Helen,  Anna,  Joseph  and  Albert. 

In  his  political  views  Mr.  Vock  is  a  republican,  his  study  of  the  ques- 
tions and  issues  of  the  day  having  led  him  to  give  stalwart  allegiance  to  the 
grand  old  party.  He  has  been  a  school  director  for  nineteen  years,  has  been 
road  commissioner  for  seven  years  and  drainage  commissioner  for  seven  years. 
In  these  positions  he  has  discharged  his  duties  with  a  promptness  and  fidelity 
that  none  question,  and  which  have  led  to  his  long  retention  in  office.  He 
and  his  wife  are  communicants  of  the  Catholic  church,  and  he  is  a  member 
of  the  Knights  of  Columbus.  When  he  arrived  in  Whiteside  county  his  cap- 
ital could  almost  literally  have  been  contained  in  a  nutshell,  for  he  possessed 
but  one  dollar.  Today  he  is  one  of  the  substantial  and  prosperous  agricul- 
turists of  the  community,  and  what  he  has  accumulated  has  been  won  through 
hard  work  day  after  day.  None  question  his  thrift  nor  his  honesty,  and  his 
example  may  well  serve  as  a  source  of  inspiration  to  others,  showing  that 
success  is  not  a  matter  of  genius,  but  is  the  outcome  of  clear  judgment,  ex- 
perience and  indefatigable  labor. 


JAMES  THOMAS  JACKSON. 

While  more  than  a  quarter  of  a  century  has  passed  since  James  Thomas 
Jackson  was  called  from  the  activities  of  this  life  he  is  yet  remembered  by 
many  friends  who  knew  him  as  a  leading  farmer  of  Mount  Pleasant  township, 
where  he  passed  away  on  the  9th  of  November,  1881.  He  was  born  at  Wood- 
stock, Madison  county,  New  York,  on  the  28th  of  February,  1825,  his  parents 
being  Orson  and  Patience  (Anthony)  Jackson,  who  were  old  settlers  of  Otse- 
go  county,  New  York.  Both  died  in  the  Empire  state,  where  the  father  had 
followed  the  shoemaker's  trade  in  order  to  provide  for  his  family.  He  had 
two  sons,  of  whom  Lucius  Jackson,  coming  to  the  west,  lived  for  many  years 
at  Cedar  Falls,  Iowa,  where  his  death  occurred. 

James  Thomas  Jackson  was  reared  and  educated  in  New  York  and  in 
early  life  learned  the  shoemaker's  trade.  It  is  a  well  known  fact  that  the 
west  has  always  been  the  land  of  opportunity  and  attracted  by  the  chances 
open  here  for  business  development  and  growth  he  came  to  Whiteside  county 
in  1856.  Although  he  had  no  previous  experience  in  farm  life,  he  deter- 
mined to  engage  in  agricultural  pursuits  and  settled  in  Mount  Pleasant  town- 
ship. When  this  farm  came  into  his  possession  it  was  a  tract  of  one  hundred 
and  twenty  acres  of  unimproved  land,  but  with  characteristic  energy  he  began 
its  development  and  soon  the  track  of  the  plow  was  seen  across  the  fields. 
When  the  sod  was  broken  and  the  harrowing  done  the  seed  was  planted  and 
in  clue  lime  the  once  raw  prairie  brought  forth  rich  crops.  As  the  years 
passed  modern  improvements  were  added  to  the  place  and  in  1876  the  present 
residence  was  erected.  While  carrying  on  general  farming  Mr.  Jackson  also 


HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY  789 

worked  to  some  extent  at  his  trade  in  Unionville  and  other  places  while  mak- 
ing his  home  upon  his  farm.  Here  he  resided  until  his  death  and  was  recog- 
nized as  one  of  the  valued  citizens  of  the  community. 

At  the  time  of  the  Civil  war  Mr.  Jackson  put  aside  all  business  and  per- 
sonal considerations  and  enlisted  as  a  member  of  Company  E,  Forty-sixth 
Illinois  Volunteer  Infantry,  in  1862.  He  was  promoted  from  the  ranks  to 
corporal  and  served  for  five  months,  when  his  health  failed  him  and  he  was 
honorably  discharged.  He  was  never  a  well  man  afterward  and  thus  practically 
gave  his  life  for  his  country. 

Mr.  Jackson  was  married  in  Madison  county,  New  York,  to  Miss  Sarah 
S.  Burton,  who  was  born  at  Eagle  Village  in  Onondaga  county,  New  York, 
January  3,  1828.  She  is  a  daughter  of  Sylvanus  and  Theodosia  (Miller)  Bur. 
ton,  who  removed  from  Vermont  to  the  Empire  state.  In  the  fall  of  1857  Mr. 
and  Mrs.  Burton  removed  westward  to  Whiteside  county  and  several  years  later 
went  to  Benton  county,  Iowa,  where  they  made  their  home  until  called  to 
their  final  rest,  the  father  dying  in  1884  and  the  mother  in  1882.  Mrs. 
Jackson  was  one  of  six  children,  of  whom  three  are  now  deceased.  Her  sister, 
Mrs.  Harriet  Rockwell,  resides  in  Forestville,  New  York,  while  her  brother, 
George  H.  Burton,  is  a  resident  of  California, 

Unto  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Jackson  were  born  five  children.  Florence,  born  in 
1857,  is  now  the  wife  of  James  Larkin,  of  Moville,  Iowa.  Charles,  born  in 
1859,  died  in  Whiteside  county  in  1879.  Nora  E.,  born  in  1863,  became  the 
wife  of  Joseph  A.  Myers,  who  was  born  in  Mount  Pleasant  township,  this 
county,  December  5,  1858,  a  son  of  Joseph  and  Maria  (Austin)  Myers,  who 
came  to  this  county  at  a  very  early  day,  settling  in  the  timber  among  the 
pioneers.  Joseph  Myers  entered  land  from  the  government  on  section  1. 
Mount  Pleasant  township — the  place  now  owned  by  H.  A.  Reynolds.  Both 
he  and  his  wife  continued  here  as  prominent  and  worthy  pioneer  people  up 
to  the  time  of  their  demise,  their  remains  being  interred  in  Morrison.  They 
had  ten  children,  of  whom  three  are  yet  living:  John  C.  Myers,  a  resident  of 
Bellingham,  Washington ;  Mrs.  Victoria  McLennon,  of  Morrison ;  and  Joseph 
A.  Unto  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Joseph  A.  Myers  have  been  born  two  children :  Paul, 
who  was  born  in  1886  in  Clarke,  South  Dakota,  and  is  at  home;  and  Ruth, 
who  was  born  in  Lee  county,  Illinois,  in  1898,  and  is  now  in  school.  Kate  L. 
Jackson,  the  fourth  member  of  the  family,  was  born  in  1865  and  became  the 
wife  of  James  McCulla  and  died  in  Albany,  New  York,  in  1888.  Her  hus- 
band now  resides  in  Ireland.  Albert  L.,  born  in  1871,  is  a  farmer  residing  at 
Livermore,  Humboldt  county,  Iowa. 

In  his  political  views  James  T.  Jackson,  the  father,  was  a  stalwart  repub- 
lican but  was  never  a  politician  in  the  sense  of  office  seeking.  However,  he 
served  as  school  director  and  was  interested  in  all  that  pertained  to  the  wel- 
fare and  substantial  upbuilding  of  the  community.  He  belonged  to  the 
Masonic  fraternity  and  the  Independent  Order  of  Odd  Fellows  and  was  a 
member  of  the  Methodist  Protestant  church,  to  which  Mrs.  Jackson  also  be- 
longs. He  was  a  man  highly  esteemed  by  all  who  knew  him  by  reason  of 
his  upright  life,  the  straightforward  methods  which  he  followed  in  business 
and  the  honorable  principles  which  characterized  him  in  every  relation.  Like 


790  HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY 

her  husband,  Mrs.  Jackson  well  deserves  mention  in  this  volume,  having  for 
n\ore  than  a  half  century  resided  in  the  county.    She  is  one  of  f  worthy  pio- 
neer women  and  can  relate  many  an  interesting  tale  of  the  early  days  and  of 
the  changes  which  have  brought  the  county  to  its  present  condition  o 
ment  and  prosperity. 


TRUMAN  CULVER. 


Trur     Q  Culver,  deceased,  was  born  in  Boonville,  New  York,  September 
9   1835  Tson Truman  H.  'and  Catharine  (Campbell)  Culver.    The  pater- 
nal grandfather,  Solomon  Culver,  was  a  colonel  in  the  Revolutionary  war 
and  was  killed  in  the  defense  of  a  fort  during  an  attack  by  the  British. 
ml  H   Culver,  the  father  of  our  subject,  was  descended  from  English  ances- 
£y  and  was  bom  in  New  York  in  1805.    He  followed  the  *«**£<*++ 
ing  for  about  twenty  years,  and  in  an  early  day  removed  with  h  ,  family 
China  township,  Lee  county,  Illinois,  his  death  occurring  in  that  coun  y  , 
the  vear  1866      His  wife's  birth  occurred  in  1810  and  she  passed  away  at 
Cambridge,  Nebraska,  in  the  '80s.    In  the  family  of  this  worthy  couple  were 
fifteen  chMren,  eleven  of  whom  grew  to  maturity,  while  four  died  in  in  ancy 
and  early  childhood.     Of  the  sons,  Herman  was  a  member  of  the  Seventh 
Illinois  Cavalry  and  now  makes  his   home   at  Port  Angeles,   Washington. 
Staunton,  a  servant  of  the  Fifth  Wisconsin  ™*^^E**£*& 
all  the  battles  of  the  Army  of  the  Potomac,  was  killed  at  the  battle  of  the 
Wilderness.    He  received  seven  wounds  and  was  buried  upon  the  field, 
liam,  a  member  of  the  Twelfth  Illinois  Infantry,  was  killed  in  the  attack 
upon  Fort  Donelson,  being  among  the  first  to  scale  the  fortifications. 
was  also  buried  on  the  field. 

Truman  Culver,  after  acquiring  a  good  literary  education,  taught  school 
for  several  terms.    In  1859,  lured  by  the  prospect  of  attaining  wealth  quickly 
he  went  to  Pike's  Peak,  but  his  experiences  there  were  not  all 
anticipated  and  after  a  short  time  he  returned  to  the  east.     Subsequently  he 
taught  school  at  Oswego,  New  York,  for  one  term,  after  which  he  accom- 
pTnied  his  parents  to  Lee  county,  Illinois,  locating  m  Union  Grove  township. 
While  still  residing  there  the  Civil  war  broke  out  and  he  at  once  raised 
a  company  and  was  selected  its  captain,  but  he  finally  resigned  hiscom- 
mi«sion  and  the  company  disbanded.     On   the  2d  of  September    1861,  he 
™lited  afa  private  in  Company  C,  Eighth  Illinois  Cavalry,  and  was  mus- 
tered into  service  at   St.   Charles   on  the  18th  of .  September.     It  was  soon 
dTscov  red  that  he  knew  more  of  military  tactic,  than   any  other  member 
o ?S  company  and  that  he  employed  himself  almost  nightly  m  drilling  the 
companv      In"  a  short  time  the  regiment  proceeded  to  their  winter  quarter, 
at    Mexlndria      The  command   was  ordered  to  the  front   and  took  up  its 
Mne  of  march  for  Richmond.     Before  reaching  Manassas    Sergeant  Culver 
reconnoitered  alone  and  on  seeing  seeing  a  rebel  concluded  to  capture  him, 


LIBRARY 

OF  THE 

UNIVERSITY  OF  ILLINOIS 


HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY  793 

but  he  was  suddenly  confronted  by  two  more,  who  commanded  him  to  sur- 
render, firing  upon  him  at  the  same  time.  Mr.  Culver  at  once  started  to 
return  to  his  comrades,  but  the  enemy  were  reinforced  by  two  more  men, 
who  also  began  firing  on  him.  Throwing  himself  on  the  side  of  his  horse,  he 
managed  to  escape  their  bullets  and  at  length  reached  camp  in  safety. 
Moving  on  in  the  advance,  with  an  occasional  skirmish,  the  command 
reached  Rappahannock  Station,  where  they  dislodged  the  enemy,  number- 
ing thirty  thousand  strong,  driving  them  across  the  Rappahannock.  The 
Fourth  New  York  Cavalry,  while  out  on  a  foraging  expedition,  became  con- 
fused and  separated  into  two  squadrons  and,  each  mistaking  the  other  for 
rebels,  began  firing  upon  each  other.  The  Eighth  Illinois  came  to  the  rescue 
and  soon  settled  the  difficulty  by  capturing  both  squadrons.  During  the 
winter  of  1862-3  the  regiment  was  chiefly  employed  in  picket  duty  and  on 
scouting  expeditions  in  that  section  of  the  country.  On  the  24th  of  May, 
1863,  Sergeant  Culver  was  promoted  to  the  position  of  second  lieutenant. 
The  spirit  of  patriotism  was  strong  within  him,  for  the  blood  of  Revolu- 
tionary ancestors  flowed  in  his  veins  and  he  had  added  new  laurels  to  the 
already  splendid  military  record  of  the  family.  Throughout  his  long  and 
interesting  career  as  a  soldier  his  conduct  was  especially  distinguished  for  a 
rare  and  indomitable  courage  under  all  the  peculiar  and  trying  circum- 
stances by  which  he  was  surrounded.  He  rose  from  the  ranks  to  the  posi- 
tion of  first  lieutenant  and  on  many  occasions  commanded  his  company 
when  in  action.  During  the  first  day's  battle  at  Gettysburg  he  took  com- 
mand of  a  special  detachment  of  two  companies  on  the  left  flank,  and 
throughout  the  remainder  of  his  life  he  carried  in  his  foot  a  ball  that  he 
received  in  this  engagement.  On  the  1st  of  October,  1864,  he  received  his 
honorable  discharge,  having  served  his  country  long  and  well  and  with  a 
bravery  questioned  by  none. 

Returning  to  the  pursuits  of  civil  life,  Mr.  Culver  conducted  a  grocery 
business  in  Rock  Falls  for  about  fourteen  years,  his  annual  sales  amounting 
to  from  forty  to  fifty  thousand  dollars.  Subsequently  he  was  engaged  in  the 
boot  and  shoe  business  on  an  extensive  scale  and  also  met  with  a  gratifying 
degree  of  success  in  the  conduct  of  this  enterprise.  His  reliable  and  straight- 
forward business  methods  gained  for  him  the  confidence  and  esteem  of  all 
with  whom  he  was  associated  and  he  was  widely  recognized  as  one  of  the 
most  prominent  merchants  and  public-spirited  citizens  of  Whiteside  county. 

Mr.  Culver  was  united  in  marriage  on  the  5th  of  September,  1865,  at 
Morrison,  Illinois,  to  Miss  Clarinda  Allen,  a  daughter  of  Philip  and  Har- 
riet (Wilson)  Allen  and  a  native  of  Saratoga  county,  New  York.  Her 
paternal  grandfather,  William  Allen,  lived  in  that  county  and  pa-sed  away 
there  when  well  advanced  in  years.  His  wife  was  Hannah  Allen.  The  ma- 
ternal grandfather,  Ezra  AVilson,  for  several  years  a  member  of  the  New 
York  legislature,  was  a  tanner  and  a  manufacturer.  The  parents  of  Mrs. 
Culver  were  also  natives  of  Saratoga  county,  New  York,  and  she  was  but 
twelve  years  of  age  when  she  accompanied  them  on  their  removal  to  Mor- 
rison, Illinois,  where  she  grew  to  womanhood.  Philip  Allen  was  a  car- 
penter and  contractor  by  trade  and  lived  at  Morrison  for  many  years, 


794  HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY 

passing  away  there  at  the  age  of  sixty.  His  wife  survived  him  and  was 
sixty-five  years  of  age  at  the  time  of  her  demise.  Mrs.  Culver  was  an  only 
child  and  by  her  marriage  also  had  but  one  child,  Glen,  who  died  at  the 
age  of  five  years. 

In  his  political  views  Mr.  Culver  was  a  stalwart  republican  and  took  a 
prominent  part  in  the  local  work  of  the  party.  He  served  as  the  first  post- 
master of  Rock  Falls,  remaining  in  office  from  1868  to  1872,  and  was  also 
a  member  of  the  school  board.  He  was  a  delegate  to  the  state  convention 
held  at  Chicago  in  September,  1891,  and  was  ever  to  be  found  working  on 
the  side  of  reform  and  improvement.  He  was  a  member  of  the  Inde- 
pendent Order  of  Odd  Fellows  and  of  the  American  Protective  Association, 
while  he  kept  in  touch  with  his  old  army  comrades  through  his  membership 
in  the  Grand  Army  of  the  Republic.  He  also  belonged  to  the  Masonic 
lodge  at  Sterling  and  at  his  death,  which  occurred  January  31,  1907,  he 
was  laid  to  rest  in  the  Morrison  cemetery  with  Masonic  honors.  The  county 
mourned  the  loss  of  one  of  its  most  prominent  and  honored  citizens,  one 
who  in  every  relation  of  life  had  proved  himself  worthy  of  the  entire  con- 
fidence and  trust  of  his  fellowmen.  Mrs.  Culver,  who  survives  her  husband, 
has  gained  an  extensive  circle  of  friends  during  the  long  period  of  her  resi- 
dence here,  her  good  traits  of  heart  and  mind  having  won  for  her  the 
admiration  and  kindly  regard  of  all  with  whom  she  has  come  in  contact. 


CHARLES  A.  ROSENGREN. 

Charles  A.  Rosengren,  who  follows  general  agricultural  pursuits  in  Colo- 
ma  township,  was  born  in  Sweden,  December  30,  1860.  a  son  of  Gustave  B.  and 
Marie  (Johnson)  Rosengren.  In  1870  the  parents  with  their  family  crossed 
the  Atlantic  and  settled  at  Rock  P'alls,  Illinois.  The  father  was  a  painter  by 
trade,  and  known  as  a  skillful  artisan,  manifesting  particular  ability  in  his 
line  as -carriage  decorator  and  stripper.  He  was  employed  by  the  Keystone 
Manufacturing  Company  but  while  thus  engaged  became  interested  in  farm- 
ing and  in  1880  resigned  his  position  with  the  manufacturing  company  and 
devoted  his  attention  to  general  agricultural  pursuits  throughout  his  remain- 
ing days,  his  death  occurring  April  25,  1906,  when  he  had  reached  the  age 
of  seventy-one  years.  His  life  was  an  active,  useful  and  honorable  one,  and 
he  left  to  his  family  of  eight  children  the  priceless  heritage  of  an  honorable 
name.  He  had  reared  his  children  to  habit?  of  industry  and  integrity  and 
all  have  become  industrious  and  respected  citizens.  The  paternal  grand- 
father of  our  subject  was  Barnhard  Rosengren,  an  extensive  paper  manufac- 
turer of  Sweden,  who  lived  in  the  county  of  Halland.  He  married  a  Miss 
Ahlgren.  whose  father  was  a  custom  house  inspector  for  many  years. 

Charles  A.  Rosengren  was  provided  the  educational  privileges  afforded 
by  the  public  schools.  He  was  less  than  ten  years  of  age  at  the  time  of  the 
emigration  to  America  and  as  his  years  and  strength  increased  he  assisted  his 
father  more  and  more  largely  in  the  work  of  the  home  farm  until  twenty-two 


HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY  795 

years  of  age,  when  he  began  life  for  himself.  The  first  year  he  farmed  for 
his  brother  on  what  was  known  as  the  old  Holland  place  in  Lee  county.  He 
then  rented  land  in  Nelson  township,  where  he  continued  for  three  years,  after 
which  he  took  up  his  abode  on  the  Long  farm,  spending  the  succeeding  year 
there. 

On  the  7th  of  March,  1889,  Mr.  Rosengren  made  preparations  for  having 
a  home  of  his  own  by  his  marriage  to  Miss  Jennie  A.  Christopher,  a  daugh- 
ter of  John  and  Marie  (Dorf)  Christopher,  natives  of  Sweden  and  still  resi- 
dents of  that  country.  The  father  is  a  farmer  and  is  also  interested  to  some 
extent  with  his  sons  in  a  large  mercantile  enterprise. 

The  year  following  his  marriage  Mr.  Rosengren  left  the  Long  farm  and 
for  twelve  years  lived  on  the  old  Samuel  Stone  homestead.  In  1902  he  pur- 
chased the  place  upon  which  he  now  resides,  constituting  one  hundred  and 
seventy-three  acres  of  rich  and  productive  land,  which  he  has  brought  under 
a  high  state  of  cultivation.  He  now  has  a  beautiful  country  home  and  there 
are  other  substantial  buildings  upon  the  place,  while  the  well  tilled  fields 
and  good  grades  of  stock  indicate  the  progressive  spirit  of  the  owner. 

The  marriage  of  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Rosengren  has  been  blessed  with  four 
children :  Ethel  Marie,  who  is  now  a  senior  in  the  township  high  school  at 
Sterling;  Ruth  Hildur,  Helen  Irene 'and  Charles  Gustave  Lawrence,  all  of 
whom  are  in  school.  All  Mr.  Rosengren's  brothers  and  sisters  are  living  and 
their  homes  are  within  a  radius  of  a  few  miles  and  all  are  prosperous  citi- 
zens of  Whiteside  county.  Charles  A.  Rosengren  is  a  liberal  minded,  progres- 
sive, enterprising  man,  highly  esteemed  by  all  who  know  him.  He  belongs 
to  the  Odd  Fellows  Lodge  at  Rock  Falls,  to  the  Knights  of  the  Globe,  gives 
his  political  support  to  the  republican  party  and  is  a  Lutheran  in  religious 
faith. 


BENJAMIN  T.  GREENE. 

Benjamin  T.  Greene  was  born  November  15.  1865,  in  Lyndon  township 
find  has  always  resided  within  its  borders,  his  home  being  now  on  section  11. 
He  is  a  son  of  Giles  and  Laura  (Mann)  Greene,  and  a  grandson  of  Benjamin 
T.  and  Hettie  (Wilson)  Greene.  His  grandparents  were  William  and  Mary 
A.  Greene  and  Tibbets  and  Phoebe  Wilson.  Giles  Greene  was  born  at  Willett, 
Cortland  county,  New  York,  March  13,  1822.  His  father  was  a  native  of 
Rhode  Island  and  after  his  removal  to  the  Empire  state  became  a  member  of 
the  New  York  State  Militia,  with  which  he  served  in  the  war  of  1812.  He 
was  a  farmer  by  occupation  and  followed  that  pursuit  throughout  his  entire 
life.  It  was  in  1809  that  he  removed  with  his  parents  to  Cortland  county, 
there  living  until  his  demise.  His  son,  Giles  Greene,  was  reared  on  the  home 
farm  there  and  was  educated  in  Cortland  and  Oxford  Academy.  At  the  age  of 
eighteen  years  he  began  teaching,  which  profession  he  followed  during  the 
winter  seasons,  while  in  the  summer  months  he  engaged  in  farming  until 
after  the  death  of  his  parents  in  1853.  Coming  to  the  west,  he  arrived  in 


796  HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY 

Whiteside  county  in  1854  and  located  in  Lyndon  township,  where  he  made 
his  home  until  his  death.  As  the  years  passed  he  prospered  and  rose  to 
prominence  in  agricultural  circles.  His  first  purchase  of  land  was  on  sections 
1  arid  12  and  included  about  fifteen  acres  which  had  been  plowed.  The  im- 
provements were  a  little  house  and  a  straw  stable  but  he  possessed  a  laudable 
ambition  and  as  his  financial  resources  increased  he  added  to  his  property  from 
time  to  time  until  he  became  the  owner  of  over  nine  hundred  acres,  thus  gain- 
ing a  place  among  the  extensive  landowners  of  the  county.  All  of  this  re- 
mains in  the  estate  except  a  tract  of  one  hundred  and  thirty-two  acres,  which 
has  been  sold. 

Giles  Greene  was  married  February  6,  1855,  at  Cincinnatus,  Cortland 
county,  New  York,  to  Miss  Laura  Mann,  who  was  born  in  Delaware  county, 
New  York,  December  27,  1827,  and,  still  surviving,  resides  with  a  daughter 
in  Sterling.  Her  parents  were  Aristarchus  and  Sophia  (Kneeland)  Mann, 
the  former  a  son  of  Oliver  and  Content  (Hill)  Mann,  the  latter  a  daughter 
of  Daniel  and  Grace  Kneelaud.  Mr.  Greene  had  been  a  resident  of  White- 
side  county  for  two  years  when  he  returned  to  New  York  for  his  bride.  Un- 
to them  were  born  five  children :  Harriett  J.,  deceased ;  Ray,  who  resides  on  the 
old  homestead;  Mary  Sophia,  the  wife  of  E.  H.  Wooster,  of  Sterling;  Benjamin 
T.,  of  this  review;  and  Stark,  a  traveling  salesman  residing  in  Sterling.  The 
death  of  the  father  occurred  January  6,  1898,  when  he  was  almost  seventy-six 
years  of  age.  He  had  led  a  very  busy  and  useful  life,  attended  by  the  success 
which  ever  follows  persistent  effort,  intelligently  directed.  For  many  years 
he  made  stock-raising  the  piincipal  feature  of  his  farm,  raising  cattle,  hogs  and 
horses  on  an  extensive  scale.  His  political  allegiance  was  always  given  to  the 
democracy. 

Benjamin  T.  Greene,  spending  his  entire  life  in  Lyndon  township,  was 
reared  on  the  old  homestead  farm  and  the  work  of  the  farm  in  its  various  de- 
partments early  became  familiar  to  him  and  qualified  him  for  the  labors  of 
later  life.  He  is  now  the  owner  of  eighty-seven  acres  of  land  on  section  11, 
and  for  nine  years  has  resided  upon  this  place,  during  which  time  he  has  added 
many  substantial  improvements  that  make  it  one  of  the  pleasing  feature?  of 
the  landscape.  He  erected  his  present  residence  and  also  has  good  barns  and 
outbuildings  upon  the  place,  while  in  his  farm  work  he  uses  the  latest  im- 
proved machinery. 

On  the  22d  of  December,  1891,  was  celebrated  the  marriage  of  Miss  Lelia 
Isabelle  Cady  and  Benjamin  T.  Greene.  The  birth  of  Mrs.  Greene  occurred 
in  Lyndon  township,  December  22.  1870,  her  parents  being  George  R.  and 
Nettie  V.  (Parshall)  Cady,  the  former  a  native  of  Lyndon  township  and  the 
latter  of  New  York.  George  R.  Cady  was  born  August  25,  1840,  his  father, 
Amos  Cady,  having  come  to  Whiteside  county  in  1837.  He  purchased  a  claim 
on  section  29.  Lyndon  township,  and  entered  a  second  claim  on  section  20. 
On  the  latter  he  built  a  frame  house,  which  was  one  of  the  first  of  that  con- 
struction in  the  county  and  it  remained  his  place  of  residence  until  his  death, 
which  Occurred  November  5,  1857.  His  first  wife  died  in  1836  and  on  the 
21st  of  March,  1837,  he  married  Charity  Crippen,  who  was  born  January  10, 
1812,  in  Rome,  Oneida  county,  New  York,  a  daughter  of  Peter  and  Char- 


HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY  797 

lotte  (Smith)  Crippen.  Amos  Cady  brought  his  wife  as  a  bride  to  Whiteside 
county,  making  the  journey  westward  by  way  of  the  lakes  to  Detroit  and 
thence  by  team  to  their  destination.  They  took  possession  of  the  little  pioneer 
cabin  here  and  while  Mrs.  Cady  managed  the  household  aifairs  Mr.  Cady 
carefully  conducted  the  work  of  the  fields.  He  died  November  5,  1857,  and 
his  wife  ever  remained  true  to  his  memory,  never  marrying  again.  Her  last 
days  were  spent  in  Lyndon,  where  she  died  at  the  very  advanced  age  of  nine- 
ty-three years,  being  one  of  the  oldest  residents  of  the  county.  In  all  her 
life  in  this  community  she  was  a  potent  factor  for  all  that  was  good  and  en- 
nobling. She  left  five  children:  William,  who  is  living  in  Kansas  City, 
Missouri ;  George  R. ;  Orlando,  of  Lyndon ;  Mrs.  Charles  Lewis,  of  Westgate, 
Iowa;  and  Eliza,  of  Philadelphia,  Missouri. 

Of  this  number  George  R.  Cady,  father  of  Mrs.  Greene,  was  reared  on 
the  old  homestead  farm  in  Lyndon  township.  On  the  14th  of  February,  1862, 
he  wedded  Nettie  V.  Parshall,  and  they  became  the  parents  of  six  children: 
Walter  D.,  of  Rock  Falls;  Mrs.  Elva  Hazard,  of  Erie,  Illinois;  Mrs.  Zella  Allen, 
of  Lyndon;  Mrs.  Greene;  Dewitt  R.,  of  Erie,  Illinois;  and  George  Merle.  For 
two  years  the  father  was  in  ill  health  and  on  the  2d  of  June,  1905,  passed 
away.  He  was  devoted  to  the  welfare  of  his  family,  was  a  kind  neighbor  and 
worthy  citizen  and  enjoyed  to  the  fullest  degree  the  respect  and  good  will  of 
all  who  knew  him.  For  nearly  a  quarter  of  a  century  he  served  as  constable 
of  Lyndon. 

Following  their  marriage  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Greene  began  their  domestic  life 
upon  a  farm  in  Lyndon  township  and  nine  years  ago  came  to  their  present 
home.  His  political  allegiance  is  given  to  the  democracy  but  he  has  never 
sought  nor  desired  office,  preferring  always  to  concentrate  his  energies  upon 
his  business  affairs,  which,  capably  directed,  are  bringing  to  him  merited 
success. 


EDWIN  LIMOND. 

Edwin  Limond,  a  cigar  manufacturer  and  news  dealer  conducting  busi- 
ness in  Rock  Falls,  was  born  in  New  Brunswick,  Canada,  July  30,  1847,  a  son 
of  William  and  Jane  (Baxter)  Limond,  the  former  a  native  of  Scotland  and 
the  latter  of  New  Brunswick  but  of  Scotch  parentage.  The  maternal  grand- 
father of  our  subject  was  Elijah  Baxter,  a  native  of  Scotland  and  a  man  of 
considerable  means,  who  owned  a  large  tract  of  land.  He  passed  away  in 
New  Brunswick  at  the  age  of  ninety-eight  years.  William  Limond,  who  was 
a  shipbuilder  and  a  sea  captain,  died  in  New  Brunswick  at  the  remarkably  old 
age  of  one  hundred  and  four  years,  having  long  survived  his  wife,  who  passed 
away  in  1 851  when  about  forty-eight  years  of  age.  They  were  Presbyterians  in 
religious  faith,  and  their  family  numbered  ten  children,  nine  sons  and  one 
daughter,  of  whom  five  still  survive:  John,  of  Chicago;  David,  who  resides 
in  Boston,  Massachusetts;  Andrew  S.,  who  makes  his  home  in  Minneapolis, 
Minnesota:  Edwin,  of  this  review:  and  Adam  B.,  of  Boston.  Elijah  Limond, 


798  HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY 

a  member  of  this  family,  served  as  a  soldier  in  the  Civil  war  for  three  years 
and  nine  months  as  a  member  of  the  Fifty-second  Illinois  Volunteer  Infan- 
try. He  was  slightly  wounded  at  the  battle  of  Shiloh,  went  with  Sherman  on 
his  celebrated  march  to  the  sea  and  participated  in  many  important  battles 
of  the  war,  being  promoted  several  times  for  bravery. 

Edwin  Limond  remained  in  the  place  of  his  nativity  until  eighteen 
years  of  age,  his  father  sailing  out  of  Portland.  He  received  a  good  literary 
education,  being  graduated  from  the  high  school,  and  taught  for  several  terms 
in  New  Brunswick.  Subsequently  he  crossed  the  border  into  the  United 
States,  removing  westward  to  Saginaw,  Michigan,  where  he  remained  for  one 
year.  On  the  expiration  of  that  period  he  came  to  Fulton,  Whiteside  county, 
Illinois,  where  he  was  employed  by  C.  L.  Ware  and  ran  a  boat  on  the  Miss- 
issippi river  for  one  season.  He  then  took  up  his  abode  in  Sterling,  where  he 
learned  the  cigarmaker's  trade  and  lived  for  four  years,  when  he  removed  to 
Clinton,  Iowa,  thence  to  Ottawa,  Illinois,  following  his  trade  for  two  years. 
Subsequently  he  returned  to  New  Brunswick  and  a  year  later  went  to  Boston, 
New  York  and  various  other  cities.  In  1898  he  once  more  came  to  White,-'1, 
county  and  opened  a  cigar  factory  of  his  own  in  Rock  Falls,  where  he  has 
since  conducted  a  successful  business.  He  manufactures  a  number  of  popular 
brands,  including  The  Bell,  Queen  Bee,  Saskatoon,  The  Gee  Whiz,  Friendly 
Tip  and  others.  In  addition  to-  his  cigar  manufacturing  enterprise  he  con- 
ducts a  news  stand,  handling  newspapers  and  the  various  popular  magazines. 
His  factory  is  located  on  Second  street  and  he  has  met  with  a  gratifying  meas- 
ure of  prosperity  in  the  conduct  of  both  branches  of  his  business. 

Mr.  Limond  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Ida  Ralston,  and  is  now  the 
father  of  five  children,  namely:  William,  Blanche,  Wallace,  Irene  and  Ed- 
win, Jr.  Miss  Blanche  Limond  is  now  a  school  teacher  at  North  Hume. 

In  his  political  views  Mr.  Limond  has  always  been  a  stanch  republican. 
He  resides  at  No.  405  Fourth  avenue  and  is  well  and  favorably  known  through- 
out the  community  as  a  progressive  and  enterprising  citizen  and  business  man. 


WILLIAM  A.  SANBORN. 

The  name  of  William  A.  Sanborn  was  an  honored  one  in  business  circles 
in  Sterling.  Through  the  force  of  his  character,  his  strong  purpose  and  laud- 
able ambition  he  gradually  worked  his  way  upward  until  for  some  years  prior  to 
his  death  he  was  cashier  of  the  First  National  Bank.  His  birth  occurred  in 
Cattaraugus  county,  New  York,  January  13,  1832,  his  parents  being  Joseph 
and  Anna  (Blaisdell)  Sanborn,  also  natives  of  the  Empire  state.  Following 
the  death  of  the  father,  the  mother  came  to  the  west  at  an  early  day  and 
lived  with  her  brother,  who  had  preceded  her  to  Polo,  Illinois.  There  she 
passed  away  when  well  advanced  in  age. 

WTilliam  A.  Sanborn  was  reared  in  Cattaraugus  county  and  acquired  a 
common-school  education  but  early  started  out  in  life  on  his  own  account.  He 
was  but  twelve  years  of  age  when  he  began  to  earn  his  own  living  and  in  his 


HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY  799 

youth  and  early  manhood  he  followed  various  pursuits,  scorning  no  employ- 
ment that  would  yield  him  an  honest  living.  The  rapidly  growing  west  with 
its  broader  opportunities  attracted  him  and  in  1854  he  came  to  Illinois,  where 
he  had  charge  of  a  construction  gang  on  the  Northwestern  Railroad,  which 
was  then  being  built.  He  was  also  in  charge  of  a  force  of  workmen  on  the 
hydraulic  power  on  the  dam  across  Rock  river  at  Sterling.  Subsequently  he 
became  agent  for  the  American  Express  Company  at  Sterling  and  occupied 
the  position  for  a  number  of  years,  also  acting  as  agent  for  the  McCormick 
agricultural  implements.  He  likewise  conducted  a  coal  business  and  through 
these  various  undertakings  he  accumulated  capital  sufficient  to  enable  him  to 
establish  a  private  banking  business  on  Depot  street.  There,  in  August,  1864, 
his  safe  was  broken  open  and  robbed.  He  afterward  removed  his  business  to 
the  present  site  of  the  First  National  Bank,  where  then  stood  a  one-story  brick 
building.  The  express  office  was  conducted  in  the  rear  end  of  the  building. 
When  the  First  National  Bank  was  organized  Mr.  Sanborn  became  one  of  its 
stockholders  and  in  fact  was  largely  instrumental  in  forming  the  company 
that  resulted  in  the  establishment  of  the  business.  From  the  beginning  he 
served  as  cashier  and  so  continued  up  to  the  time  of  his  deathVwhich  occurred 
October  24,  1901,  when  he  had  reached  the  age  of  sixty-nine  years  and  nine 
months.  In  all  his  business  relations  he  was  found  reliable  and  trustworthy  as 
well  as  energetic  and  determined,  and  his  example  may  well  serve  as  a  stimu- 
lus and  an  encouragement  to  others. 

Mr.  Sanborn  was  married  to  Miss  Helen  McCune,  a  daughter  of  William 
McCune.  They  became  the  parents  of  a  son  and  two  daughters:  John  San- 
born; Anne,  now  deceased;  and  Helen,  who  died  at  the  age  of  three  years. 
The  son,  John  Sanborn,  was  born  and  reared  in  Sterling,  attended  the  pub- 
lic schools  and  was  graduated  from  the  noted  Philips  Exeter  Academy  at 
Exeter,  New  Hampshire.  He  then  turned  his  attention  to  the,  stock  business 
and  engaged  in  the  breeding  and  raising  of  horses,  in  which  he  continued  with 
his  father  until  the  latter's  death.  He  has  since  lived  retired,  giving  his 
supervision  to  his  invested  interests.  He  is  now  a  director  in  the  First  National 
Bank  and  has  other  income  property.  Mrs.  Sanborn  was  reared  in  the  faith  of 
the  Episcopal  church.  She  was  a  lady  of  many  excellent  traits  of  character, 
devoted  to  the  welfare  of  her  husband  and  children,  while  in  friendship  she 
was  ever  loyal.  She  died  in  1871  at  the  age  of  thirty-three  years. 

Mr.  Sanborn  survived  for  three  decades.  In  his  death  Sterling  lost  one 
of  its  representative  and  honored  citizens.  He  served  as  mayor  of  the  city  for 
one  term,  was  supervisor  for  a  number  of  years  and  a  member  of  the  school 
board  for  about  forty  years.  In  all  his  relations  to  the  public  he  was  found  a 
faithful  official,  placing  the  general  good  before  personal  aggrandizement  and 
Ihe  public  welfare  before  partisanship.  His  business  interests  were  of  a  nature 
that  contributed  largely  to  the  upbuilding  and  commercial  progress  of  the 
city.  Aside  from  his  banking  interests  he  was  for  a  number  of  years  presi- 
dent of  the  Sterling  Hydraulic  Company,  acting  in  that  capacity  up  to  the 
time  of  bis  death.  He  was  likewise  president  of  the  Sterling  Gas  and  Electric 
Light  Works  and  in  business  was  notably  prompt,  energetic  and  reliable.  He 
formed  his  plans  readily  and  was  determined  in  their  execution,  yet  in  man- 


800  HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY 

ner  he  was  quiet  and  reserved  rather  than  aggressive.  He  commanded  respect 
because  his  strong  qualities  stood  the  test  of  time  and  of  friendship.  He  was 
a  member  of  the  Masonic  fraternity  and  in  his  life  exemplified  the  sterling 
principle.*  of  the  craft,  .^hile  his  somewhat  reticent  manner  in  a  degree 
limited  the  number  of  ms  friends,  those  who  came  within  the  closer  circle  of 
a  more  intimate  acquaintance  entertained  for  him  the  warmest  esteem  while 
all  who  knew  him  respected  him  for  what  he  accomplished  and  for  the  prin- 
ciples which  guided  him  in  every  relation  of  life./ 


DANIEL  HOLLINSHEAD. 

No  resident  of  Whiteside  county  has  more  intimate  or  accurate  knowl- 
edge of  the  events  which  have  shaped  its  history,  the  course  of  its  progress 
and  the  nature  of  its  development  than  Daniel  Hollinshead,  who  since  1839 
has  lived  in  Whiteside  county,  while  for  sixty-seven  years  he  has  made  his 
home  upon  the  farm  which  is  yet  his  place  of  residence.  He  well  deserves 
prominent  mention  in  this  volume,  as  his  life  record  has  been  in  many 
respects  exemplary,  proving  a  practical  illustration  of  progressive  citizenship 
and  honorable  business  methods. 

Mr.  Hollinshead  was  born  in  Kingston,  Canada,  February  7,  1834,  hia 
parents  being  John  and  Elizabeth  (Rush)  Hollinshead.  The  mother  was  a 
native  of  Pennsylvania  and  a  grandniece  of  Benjamin  Rush,  one  of  the 
signers  of  the  Declaration  of  Independence.  Her  mother,  Mrs.  Julia  Ann 
Rush,  belonged  to  &.  very  patriotic  family  and  she  heartily  espoused  the  cause 
of  the  colonists.  Frequently  donning  male  attire  she  did  picket  duty  for  the 
patriot  army  in  the  Revolutionary  war.  Subsequently  she  accompanied  her 
son-in-law,  John  Hollinshead,  to  Canada,  and  afterward  came  with  the  family 
to  Whiteside  county,  Illinois,  where  she  died  in  1842,  her  grave  being  made 
in  the  family  cemetery  on  the  home  farm. 

John  Hollinshead  was  a  native  of  Jersey  City,  New  Jersey,  born  January 
6,  1798,  and  was  quite  young  when  he  went  to  Canada  with  his  father,  Jacob 
Hollinshead,  who  died  in  that  country.  The  latter  was  a  native  of  one  of  the 
eastern  states,  was  a  hatter  by  trade  and  in  religious  faith  was  a  Friend,  or 
Quaker.  Reared  in  the  Dominion,  John  Hollinshead  having  arrived  at  years 
of  maturity,  was  there  married  to  Elizabeth  Rush  and  continued  a  resident 
of  Canada  until  1839,  when  with  his  wife  and  five  children  he  again  crossed 
the  border,  once  more  becoming  a  resident  of  the  United  States.  He  located 
in  Whiteside  county  when  it  was  an  almost  unbroken  wilderness.  The  jour- 
ney had  been  made  by  way  of  the  Great  Lakes  to  Chicago,  which  city  had 
been  incorporated  only  two  years  before.  Thence  they  proceeded  by  wagon 
to  this  county  and  established  a  home  in  what  is  now  Clyde  township.  Be- 
lieving that  the  geographical  situation  of  Chicago  would  one  day  make  it  a 
great  city,  John  Hollinshead  returned  there  and  bargained  for  a  farm  in  what 
:s  now  the  heart  of  the  metropolis,  but  as  he  could  not  collect  money  which 
was  due  him  did  not  succeed  in  making  the  purchase.  For  two  years  he 


LIBRAHY 

OF  TH£ 

UNIVERSITY  OF  ILLINOIS 


HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY  803 

resided  in  Clyde  township  and  twice  during  that  period  hauled  grain  to  the 
Chicago  market,  where  he  sold  his  wheat  at  sixty  cents  per  bushel.  He  was 
closely  associated  with  the  early  development  of  the  county  and  at  the  time 
of  his  death  had  succeeded  in  improving  a  new  farm  of  one  hundred  and 
forty  acres  in  Ustick  township.  He  died  in  1845,  while  his  wife  passed  away 
in  the  spring  of  1863. 

Daniel  Hollinshead  spent  the  first  five  years  of  his  life  in  the  county  of 
his  birth  and  since  that  time  has  been  a  resident  of  Whiteside  county.  In 
his  early  boyhood  he  pursued  his  studies  in  a  little  log  schoolhouse  under 
"the  bluff"  and  in  the  school  of  experience  has  learned  many  valuable  lessons 
which  a  retentive  memory  has  fixed  upon  his  mind.  Reading  and  observa- 
tion have  also  broadened  his  knowledge  and  made  his  opinions  of  worth  in 
the  settlement  of  community  affairs.  His  training  at  farm  labor  was  not 
meager,  for  from  an  early  day  he  followed  the  plow  and  on  attaining  his 
majority  he  and  his  brother  Jacob  rented  the  farm  from  their  mother  and 
thus  cultivated  it  for  four  years.  He  still  lives  upon  the  old  homestead, 
which  has  now  been  his  place  of  residence  for  sixty-seven  years  and  today  his 
landed  possessions  comprise  two  hundred  and  eighty  acres  in  Ustick  and  in 
Fulton  townships.  He  was  at  one  time  engaged  quite  extensively  in  the 
breeding  of  fine  horses  and  was  the  owner  of  a  fine  stallion  and  also  had  an 
interest  in  a  Belgium  draft  horse.  He  has  also  fed  cattle  and  hogs  quite 
extensively  for  the  market  and  in  addition  to  general  farming  and  stock- 
raising  he  buys  and  sells  farm  properties. 

Mr.  Hollinshead  has  been  married  twice.  On  the  2d  of  July,  1859,  he 
wedded  Mary  Knight,  who  was  born  in  Hancock  county,  Illinois,  a  daughter 
of  Wesley  and  Louisa  (Cowles)  Knight,  who  were  of  Mormon  faith  and  when 
the  people  of  that  denomination  were  driven  from  Nauvoo  came  to  Fulton, 
where  her  father  died  while  on  his  way  to  California.  His  wife  was  a  daugh- 
ter of  Elder  Cowles,  one  of  the  elders  who  was  opposed  to  Brigham  Young  on 
the  question  of  polygamy.  Mr.  Hollinshead  died  April  8,  1864,  leaving  four 
children,  of  whom  three  passed  away  in  infancy.  The  only  one  now  surviving 
is  Dora,  the  wife  of  Quincy  L.  Slocum,  who  is  superintendent  of  sand  com- 
panies at  St.  Louis,  Missouri,  and  they  have  two  living  children,  Leith  H. 
and  Lloyd  Q.,  and  one  deceased,  Liebling  Mary,  who  died  March  15,  1907. 

Having  lost  his  first  wife,  Mr.  Hollinshead  was  married  September  16, 
1868,  to  Miss  Rebecca  M.  Hubbell,  who  was  born  in  Summit  county,  Ohio, 
July  31,  1837,  a  daughter  of  Matthew  and  Betsy  (Foote)  Hubbell,  the  latter 
a  native  of  eastern  New  York  and  the  former  of  Bridgeport,  Connecticut. 
He  was  a  son  of  Andrew  Hubbell,  a  farmer,  and  on  leaving  the  home  farm 
Matthew  Hubbell  learned  the  tailor's  trade  in  New  Berlin,  New  York,  follow- 
ing that  vocation  until  forty-five  years  of  age.  After  spending  some  time  in 
Ohio,  he  removed  to  St.  Clair  county,  Michigan,  where  he  began  farming 
and  there  his  death  occurred  in  November,  1886.  His  early  political  allegi- 
ance was  given  to  the  democracy,  but  in  antebellum  days  he  became  a  stanch 
abolitionist  and  took  an  active  part  in  the  operation  of  the  underground 
railroad.  His  first  wife  died  January  19,  1840,  and  in  1842  he  wedded  her 
sister,  Seraphina  Foote,  by  whom  he  had  one  son,  Matthew.  There  were 


804  HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY 

five  children  of  his  first  marriage,  of  whom  one  died  in  infancy,  while  Lucy 
died  at  the  age  of  twenty-two  years.  The  others  are:  Lois,  the  wife  of 
Harvey  Coburn,  of  Sanilac  county,  Michigan;  Angelina,  the  wife  of  John 
Allen,  of  St.  Clair  county,  Michigan ;  and  Mrs.  Hollinshead. 

By  her  marriage  Mrs.  Rebecca  Hollinshead  became  the  mother  of  six 
children :  Delia  A.,  the  wife  of  Frank  Hollinshead,  a  resident  of  Plainville, 
Kansas,  by  whom  she  has  one  son,  Thayer  D.,  and  a  daughter,  Jeunnette, 
deceased;  L.  Hubbell,  who  married  Phernia  Wilson  and  died  March  8,  1901; 
D.  Earl,  who  married  Mrs.  Phernia  Hollinshead,  the  widow  of  his  brother, 
and  lives  with  his  father,  operating  the  farm ;  Archie  F.,  who  died  December 
5,  1881,  at  the  age  of  five  years;  C.  Burton,  who  is  also  assisting  in  carrying 
on  the  home  farm  and  has  recently  patented  an  animal  tamer;  and  Clare  R., 
at  home. 

Aside  from  his  farming  interests,  Mr.  Hollinshead  has  been  identified 
with  the  Garden  Plain  Mutual  Insurance  Company.  His  position  on  political 
questions  is  never  an  equivocal  one.  He  gives  stalwart  support  to  the  democ- 
racy and  has  filled  several  local  offices.  He  served  for  six  years  as  road  com- 
missioner, was  also  school  director  for  a  number  of  years  and  was  likewise 
justice  of  the  peace.  Whether  in  office  or  out  of  it  he  is  always  loyal  to  the 
interests  of  the  community  and  his  aid  and  cooperation  have  ever  been 
.  counted  upon  for  the  furtherance  of  works  of  public  moment.  His  memory 
forms  a  connecting  link  between  the  primitive  past,  with  all  of  its  pioneer 
hardships,  trials  and  privations,  and  the  progressive  present,  with  its  many 
evidences  of  modern  civilization.  For  almost  seven  decades  he  has  lived  in 
the  county,  spending  his  boyhood  days  here  when  it  was  a  frontier  district, 
aiding  in  his  manhood  in  its  development  and  upbuilding,  while  in  the  even- 
ing of  life  he  enjoys  the  advantages  that  have  come  with  the  passing  of  time 
as  the  county  has  been  settled  and  improved.  He  enjoys  the  regard  of  young 
and  old,  rich  and  poor,  and  has  the  confidence  and  trust  of  all  with  whom 
business  or  social  relations  have  brought  him  in  contact. 


CLARENCE  E.  JOHNSON. 

Clarence  E.  Johnson,  publisher  of  The  Record  of  Morrison,  was  born  at 
Weston,  McLean  county.  Illinois,  August  18,  1868,  a  son  of  Dr.  Hiram  E. 
and  Anna  E.  (Wheeler)  Johnson.  His  paternal  grandfather,  who  also  bore 
the  name  of  Hiram  Johnson,  carried  powder  and  ammunition  to  the  boats 
at  the  battle  of  Lake  Champlain  and  he  had  a  half  brother  who  belonged  to 
the  famous  Vermont  Rangers  and  was  at  the  capture  of  Fort  Ticonderoga. 
Hiram  Johnson,  Sr.,  wedded  Esther  Tyler,  who  was  born  near  Brattleboro,  Ver- 
mont, and  whose  father  was  a  soldier  of  the  Revolutionary  war. 

Dr.  Hiram  E.  Johnson  is  a  native  of  Windham,  Vermont,  born  Decem- 
ber 17,  1834,  and  is  now  living  in  Fairbury.  Illinois,  at  the  age  of  seventy- 
three  years.  He  wa<  reared  to  farm  life,  pursued  hi*  early  education  in  the 


HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY  805 

common  schools  and  was  graduated  from  the  Castleton  Medical  College  at  Cas- 
tleton,  Vermont,  on  the  17th  of  June,  1857.  He  afterward  pursued  post- 
graduate work  at  Belleview  College,  in  New  York  city  in  1863-4.  He  arrived 
in  Illinois  on  the  14th  of  April,  1865,  and  settled  at  Stillman  Valley  near 
Rock  ford,  where  he  practiced  his  profession  for  about  three  years.  He  next 
.settled  at  Weston  and  built  the  first  house  in  that  place,  also  establishing  a 
drug  store  there.  He  likewise  served  as  postmaster  and  remained  at  that  loca- 
tion for  ten  years.  In  1876  he  removed  to  Fairbury,  where  he  still  resides  and 
where  he  is  now  practically  living  retired,  spending  his  winters  in  Florida. 
He  has  been  very  successful  as  a  medical  practitioner  and  business  man  and 
lias  made  judicious  investments  in  property,  including  realty  in  Illinois,  South 
Dakota  and  Florida,  his  property  interests  now  bringing  him  a  good  income. 
His  life  has  been  actuated  by  high  and  honorable  purposes  in  harmony  with 
his  profession  as  a  member  of  the  Baptist  church.  He  has  served  as  an  offi- 
cer in  the  church  and  does  all  in  his  power  to  promote  its  growth  and  extend 
its  influence.  He  was  prominent  in  the  Odd.  Fellows  Society  in  former  years 
and  for  a  long  period  was  a  stalwart  republican  but  for  several  years  past  has 
been  actively  identified  with  the  prohibition  party,  which  indicates  his  views 
upon  the  temperance  question.  He  is  now  serving  as  secretary  of  the  prohibi- 
tion central  committee  and  does  all  in  his  power  to  inculcate  the  spirit  of  tem- 
perance among  those  with  whom  he  comes  in  contact.  He  married  Anna  E. 
Wheeler,  who  was  born  in  New  York  city  and  is  of  English  ancestry.  Her 
father,  Lucius  Wheeler,  was  a  manufacturer  of  hammers,  skates  and  other 
iron  goods  in  the  eastern  metropolis.  His  wife  was  Mrs.  Sarah  R.  Wheeler, 
and  his  father  was  Joseph  Wheeler,  who  was  captain  of  a  company  in  one  of 
the  Vermont  regiments  during  the  war  of  the  Revolution,  and  was  accorded 
prominent  mention  in  some  of  the  old  United  States  histories.  Mrs.  Johnson 
is  still  living  at  the  age  of  seventy-two  years  and  Ls  also  a  member  of  the 
Baptist  church.  Unto  Dr.  and  Mrs.  Hiram  E.  Johnson  were  born  five  chil- 
dren :  William  H..  a  postal  clerk  on  the  Chicago  &  Alton  railroad,  making 
his  home  at  Normal,  Illinois;  Florence  E.,  who  is  manager  of  the  Chicago 
Art  Education  Company,  located  in  the  McClurg  building  at  Chicago;  Clar- 
ence E.,  of  this  review ;  and  Lucius  and  Charles,  both  of  whom  died  in  infancy. 

Clarence  E.  Johnson  was  a  pupil  in  the  country  schools  and  also  in  the 
public  schools  of  Fairbury.  He  was  afterwards  employed  for  about  five  years 
in  the  Elgin  Watch  factory  and  then  entered  the  newspaper  field  at  Sibley, 
Illinois,  having  purchased  the  Sibley  Gazette.  After  three  months  he  sold 
that  paper  and  went  to  Clifton,  Illinois,  where  he  established  the  Clifton  Ad- 
vocate in  February,  1893,  continuing  the  publication  of  that  paper  until  the 
fall  of  1902,  when  he  sold  the  plant  and  removed  to  Winchester,  where  he 
purchased  a  defunct  plant  and  established  the  Scott  County  Herald.  After 
publishing  it  for  two  years  he  again  sold  out  in  1904  and  purchased  the  in- 
terest of  W.  B.  Barnes  in  The  Record  at  Morrison,  since  which  time  he  has 
conducted  the  paper  with  growing  success.  It  is  a  weekly  republican  paper, 
devoted  to  local  interests  and  has  a  good  circulation  and  also  a  gratifying 
advertising  patronage.  He  conducts  in  connection  therewith  a  good  job  de- 
partment, making  a  specialty  of  high  grade  printing. 


806  HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY 

In  1891  Mr.  Johnson  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Harriet  L.  Cox,  who 
was  born  in  Beloit,  Wisconsin,  in  1870,  a  daughter  of  Franklin  F.  and  Lucy 
(Parmalee)  Cox,  the  father  a  traveling  salesman.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Johnson  had 
three  children  but  lost  their  first  born,  Harold  E.  The  others  are  Howard  A. 
and  Esther  L.  The  parents  are  members  of  the  Presbyterian  church  and 
active  in  its  work,  Mr.  Johnson  serving  now  as  a  member  of  the  session.  He 
has  membership  relations  with  the  Knights  of  Pythias  and  the  Modern  Wood- 
men of  America  and  gives  his  political  allegiance  to  the  republican  party. 
Matters  of  general  interest  awaken  his  attention  and  receive  his  cooperation. 
He  is  now  secretary  of  the  Whiteside  Farmers  Mutual  Telephone  Company  and 
treasurer  of  the  board  of  trustees  of  the  Odell  public  library  of  Morrison.  He 
is  also  a  member  of  the  Jackson  hose  company,  the  volunteer  fire  department 
of  the  city.  His  interest  in  community  affairs  is  always  that  of  an  active 
worker  and  his  labors  have  been  an  element  in  the  substantial  development 
of  Morrison  since  he  allied  his  interests  with  hers. 


DAVID  MCCARTNEY. 

David  McCartney,  whose  position  of  prominence  in  connection  with  the 
business  interests  and  public  life  of  Sterling  well  entitled  him  to  representation 
in  this  volume,  as  one  of  the  honored  residents  of  Whiteside  county,  was  born 
in  Dansville,  New  York,  September  16,  1807.  His  parents,  William  and  Mary 
(McCurdy)  McCartney;  were  natives  of  Scotland,  born  near  Castle  Douglas, 
in  Kirkcudbrightshire.  Their  family  numbered  thirteen  children,  ten  of 
whom  reached  adult  age,  but  all  are  now  deceased.  The  father,  emigrating 
to  the  new  world,  became  a  farmer  of  the  Genesee  valley  of  New  York  and 
had  a  large  estate  in  Livingston  county,  where  he  died  when  about  sixty  years 
of  age.  His  wife  survived  him  for  about  twenty  years  or  more  and  had 
passed  the  eightieth  milestone  on  life's  journey  at  the  time  of  her  demise.  She 
possessed  remarkable  business  and  executive  ability  as  well  as  keen,  strong  in- 
tellect that  was  manifest  in  literary  taste.  They  came  to  America  in  the  eigh- 
teenth century  and  William  McCartney  was  the  founder  of  the  family  in  this 
country.  His  father  and  also  his  grandfather  likewise  bore  the 
name  of  William.  The  maternal  grandfather  of  our  subject  lived  and  died  in 
County  Down,  Ireland,  passing  away  at  an  advanced  age.  He  was  a  farmer 
who  owned  and  cultivated  land  on  the  Emerald  isle.  His  wife,  Mrs.  Mar- 
garet (Ferrier)  McCoy,  also  attained  an  advanced  age. 

David  McCartney,  whose  name  introduces  this  record,  spent  the  days  of 
his  boyhood  and  youth  in  Dansville,  New  York,  and  as  a  young  man  engaged 
in  business  there  as  a  dry-goods  merchant,  but  thinking  that  the  opportunities 
were  better  in  the  west  he  came  to  the  Mississippi  valley  in  1843  and  spent  two 
years  in  St.  Louis  in  the  dry-goods  business. .  He  afterward  removed  to  Ful- 
ton, Illinois,  where  he  studied  law  and  was  admitted  to  the  bar.  He  then  en- 
gaged in  the  practice  of  the  profession  for  a  number  of  years,  or  until  1865, 
when  he  came  to  Sterling.  Here  he  was  soon  recognized  as  a  prominent,  able 


HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY  807 

lawyer  and  continued  to  act  as  prosecuting  attorney  for  the  four  districts  of 
northern  Illinois.  His  legal  skill  and  knowledge  were  widely  recognized  and 
gained  him  distinction  at  a  bar  numbering  many  prominent  members. 

Mr.  McCartney  was  twice  married.  He  first  wedded  Miss  Anne  McNair 
and  unto  them  were  born  two  daughters:  Elizabeth,  the  widow  of  Augustus 
N.  Parker  and  a  resident  of  Dansville,  New  York:  and  Mary  Anne,  of  Sterling, 
who  is  the  widow  of  the  late  James  A.  Gait.  Following  the  death  of  his  first 
wife,  Mr.  McCartney  was  married  to  Miss  Augusta  Agge  and  unto  them  were 
born  five  children,  three  sons  and  two  daughters,  but  the  sons  died  in  infancy. 
Their  daughter,  Fannie,  became  the  wife  of  Charles  Merritt  Worthirigton  and 
is  mentioned  elsewhere  in  this  volume,  while  Anne  is  the  wife  of  C.  L.  Shel- 
don, one  of  the  prominent  attorneys  of  Sterling. 

The  death  of  Mr.  McCartney  occurred  in  Sterling  on  the  19th  of  March, 
1895,  when  he  had  reached  the  age  of  seventy-nine  years,  and  his  wife  sur- 
vived him  for  about  eleven  years,  passing  away  at  the  age  of  seventy-seven. 
He  was  a  very  talented  man  and  is  said  to  have  been  the  finest  orator  that  has 
ever  practiced  before  the  Whiteside  county  bar.  He  was  noted  for  his  witti- 
cisms,, for  his  comprehensive  knowledge  of  the  principles  of  jurisprudence 
and  his  skillful  tact  in  winning  decisions.  He  never  lost  but  one  case.  He 
was  particularly  celebrated  as  a  criminal  lawyer  and  presented  his  cases  with 
a  clearness  and  cogency  that  left  no  doubt  as  to  the  correctness  of  his  posi- 
tion. He  practiced  quite  largely  before  the  supreme  court  of  the  state  and  was 
widely  recognized  throughout  Illinois  as  one  of  its  able  attorneys.  His  atten- 
tion was  given  strictly  to  his  profession  and  his  undivided  allegiance  no  doubt 
in  large  measure  accounts  for  his  eminent  success  as  a  lawyer.  He  inscribed 
his  name  high  on  the  keystone  of  the  legal  arch  of  Illinois  and  his  professional 
record  reflected  credit  and  honor  upon  the  bar  of  the  state. 


MYRON  C.  BUMP. 

Myron  C.  Bump,  a  representative  of  the  farming  interests  of  Clyde  town- 
ship, belongs  to  one  of  the  old  families  of  Whiteside  county.  His  father, 
Joseph  W.  Bump,  located  in  this  county  in  1855.  He  was  born  in  De  Ruyter 
township,  Madison  county,  New  York,  June  16,  1831,  his  parents  being  Mar- 
cus and  Mary  A.  (Winegar)  Bump,  the  former 'a  native  of  New  England  and 
the  latter  of  New  York.  They  were  both  representatives,  however,  of  old  New 
England  families  and  following  their  marriage  they  were  numbered  among 
the  farming  people  of  Madison  county,  New  York,  until  called  to  their  final 
rest.  They  held  membership  with  the  Society  of  Friends  and  the  father  died 
in  1871  at  the  age  of  seventy  years,  while  his  wife  died  in  1858  aged  nearly 
sixty  years. 

Joseph  Bump  remained  upon  the  home  farm  until  about  eighteen  years 
of  age  and  in  1849  became  a  blacksmith's  apprentice  under  his  uncle,  Edward 
Mitchell,  of  Cayuga  county,  New  York.  He  was  thus  employed  for  three 
years  and  in  the  meantime  removed  to  Onondaga  county,  New  York,  where  he 


808  .HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE   COUNTY 

worked  at  his  trade  until  twenty-three  years  of  age.  Attracted  by  the  oppor- 
tunities of  the  middle  west,  he  then  came  alone  to  Whiteside  county,  Illinois, 
March  26,  1855,  settling  in  Clyde  township,  where  he  purchased  one  hundred 
and  sixty  acres  of  land.  For  a  few  years,  however,  he  did  not  cultivate  hi.< 
farm  to  any  extent  but  continued  to  engage  in  blacksmithing  and  also  worked 
as  a  farm  laborer  in  the  community,  after  which  he  began  the  improvement  of 
his  own  property. 

Joseph  W.  Bump  was  married  in  Fairview,  Mercer  county,  Pennsylvania) 
December  27,  1865,  to  Miss  Alvira  L.  Converse,  who  was  born  in  Medina 
county,  Ohio,  August  4,  1836,  a  daughter  of  Winthrop  and  Laura  (Went- 
worth)  Converse,  the  former  a  native  of  Massachusetts  and  the  latter  of 
Canada.  Both  were  of  English  lineage  and  of  more  direct  New  England 
ancestry.  Her  father  died  in  Mercer  county,  Pennsylvania,  in  August,  1868, 
after  which  the  mother  made  her  home  with  a  son  in  Iowa  until  her  death 
in  September,  1882,  at  the  age  of  eighty-two  years.  Mrs.  Bump  was  but  five 
years  old  when  her  parents  removed  from  Ohio  to  Mercer  county,  Pennsyl- 
vania, where  she  was  educated.  She  was  brought  as  a  bride  to  the  farm  in 
Clyde  township  which  her  husband  had  secured  and  with  characteristic  energy 
they  began  the  further  improvement  and  development  of  the  place,  Mrs. 
Bump  carefully  managing  the  interests  of  the  household,  while  her  husband 
performed  the  work  of  the  fields.  He  built  here  a  fine  residence  after  the 
war  and  substantial  outbuildings  and  in  addition  to  grain  production  also 
engaged  in  raising  Durham  cattle.  His  farming  interests,  however,  were  in- 
terrupted by  his  active  military  service  in  the  Civil  war,  for  on  the  3d  day  of 
August,  1862,  he  joined  the  Seventy-fifth  Regiment  of  Illinois  Volunteers, 
enlisting  in  Company  C  under  Captain  Altman,  of  Morrison,  and  he  was  mus- 
tered in  at  Dixon,  September  2.  He  was  with  his  regiment  in  the  battle  of 
Perryville,  Kentucky,  September  8,  1862,  and  also  met  the  enemy  between 
Lancaster,  Crab  Orchard  and  Danville.  Soon  after  he  became  ill  and  was 
sent  to  the  hospital  at  Danville.  October  25.  1862,  where  he  was  honorably 
discharged  in  the  spring  of  1863.  On  the  organization  of  the  republican  party 
he  became  one  of  its  stalwart  supporters  and  he  continued  a  believer  in  the 
faith  of  the  Society  of  Friends,  while  Mrs.  Bump  became  a  .member  of  the 
Baptist  church.  Their  family  numbered  three  sons:  Myron  C.,  born  Sep- 
tember 2,  1866;  Winthrop  M.,  March  26,  1869;  and  Marcus  S.,  November  16, 
1873.  The  last  named,  however,  died  January  8,  1894,  at  the  age  of  twenty 
years,  one  month  and  twenty-three  days.  The  father  died  May  28,  1887. 
The  mother  still  survives  and  is  one  of  the  esteemed  pioneer  women  of  the 
county.  She  has  changed  her  church  relationship  from  Morrison  to  the  Mal- 
vern  German  Baptist  church. 

Myron  C.  Bump  was  reared  upon  the  old  homestead  farm,  no  event  of 
special  importance  occurring  to  vary  the  routine  of  life  for  him  in  his  boy- 
hood days.  He  attended  the  public  schools  and  received  ample  training  in 
the  work  of  the  fields,  assisting  in  the  cultivation  and  development  of  the 
home  place  from  the  time  he  was  old  enough  to  handle  the  plow.  The  old 
homestead  is  now  being  operated  by  him  and  his  brother,  W.  M.  Bump,  and 
comprises  one  hundred  and  ten  acres  of  arable  and  productive  land  on  section 


HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY  809 

27,  Clyde  township.     The  improvements  have  been  kept  up  and  others  have 
been  added  until  the  farm  is  one  of  the  best  of  the  neighborhood. 

Mr.  Bump  celebrated  Christmas  day  of  1901  by  his  marriage  to  Miss 
Pinkie  L.  Birdsell,  whose  mother  is  still  living  upon  the  old  homestead  in 
this  county.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Bump  are  both  well  known  in  this  locality,  where 
their  entire  lives  have  been  passed  and  many  of  their  friends  of  the  present 
day  were  also  friends  of  their  childhood.  He  has  been  a  member  of  the 
Knights  of  Pythias  lodge  of  Morrison  for  about  twelve  years. 


PHILIP  S.  KIRK. 

Philip  S.  Kirk,  who  for  a.  long  period  was  engaged  in  the  practice  of 
dentistry  in  Morrison  but  is  now  living  retired  in  Fulton,  was  born  in  Warren 
county,  Virginia,  August  8,  1857,  his  parents  being  Philip  and  Mary  E, 
(Wines)  Kirk.  The  father  was  born  in  Pennsylvania  and  the  mother  in 
Virginia  and  both  were  representatives  of  families  established  in  this  country 
at  an  early  day.  Philip  Kirk,  ST.,  devoted  his  life  to  merchandising,  dealing 
largely  in  shoes  in  the  town  of  Front  Royal,  Virginia.  Following  the  Civil 
war,  he  removed  in  1869  to  Darlington,  Lafayette  county,  Wisconsin,  where 
he  continued  in  business  as  a  shoe  merchant  for  three  years.  In  1872  he 
came  to  Illinois,  settling  at  Mount  Carroll,  where  he  conducted  a  shoe  store 
up  to  the  time  of  his  death  in  1876.  He  had  for  two  years  survived  his 
wife  and  left  a  family  of  four  children:  William  H.,  now  residing  in  Den- 
ver, Colorado;  Philip  S.,  of  this  review;  Lucy,  who  died  in  Washington,  D.  C., 
in  1879;  and  Walter  B.,  who  died  in  Janesville,  Wisconsin,  in  1903.  The 
father  served  as  a  private  in  the  Confederate  army,  being  at  the  front  during 
almost  the  entire  period  of  the  Civil  war.  He  participated  in  many  hotly 
contested  battles,  including  the  engagements  of  the  Wilderness,  Antietam, 
Gettysburg,  and  many  others. 

Philip  S.  Kirk,  whose  name  introduces  this  record,  pursued  his  education 
in  the  country  schools  of  Wisconsin  and  Illinois  and  having  arrived  at  years 
of  maturity  he  determined  upon  a  professional  course  as  a  life  work  and  at 
the  age  of  twenty-two  years  took  up  the  study  of  dentistry  under  the  preceptor- 
ship  of  Dr.  F.  B.  Johnson,  of  Morrison,  Illinois,  to  which  city  Mr.  Kirk  had 
removed  in  that  year.  He  was  in  Dr.  Johnson's  office  for  three  years  and  then 
.engaged  in  practice  on  his  own  account.  Throughout  his  entire  business 
career  he  was  connected  with  the  profession  and  gained  a  high  degree  of  skill 
and  proficiency  in  this  line. 

On  the  31st  of  January,  1883,  Dr.  Kirk  was  married  to  Miss  Clara  E. 
Bu.«h.  of  Carroll  county,  Illinois,  a  daughter  of  Jabez  S.  and  Alma  (Esty) 
Bush,  who  were  early  settlers  of  Carroll  county.  There  Mr.  Bush  died  in 
November,  1885,  leaving  a  widow  and  four  children,  namely:  Mrs.  Kirk; 
Ira  E.,  who  resides  in  Ontonagon  county,  Michigan ;  Albert  D.,  of  Mount  Car- 
roll, Illinois ;  and  Nellie  A.,  the  wife  of  J.  V.  Stapleton,  of  Morrison. 

Following  his  marriage  in  1883,  Dr.  Kirk  removed  to  Shullsburg,  Wis- 
consin, where  he  opened  an  office  for  the  practice  of  dentistry.  He  remained 


810  HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY 

there  for  seven  years,  when  in  order  to  still  further  perfect  himself  in  his 
chosen  calling  he  matriculated  in  the  dental  department  of  what  was  then 
the  American  College  but  is  now  the  dental  department  of  the  Northwestern 
University  of  Chicago.  He  was  graduated  therefrom  in  1890,  after  which  he 
returned  to  Shullsburg  and  resumed  practice  there.  He  continued  at  that 
point  until  1892,  when  he  removed  to  Morrison,  where  he  practiced  until 
1905.  In  1897  he  had  pursued  a  post-graduate  course  in  the  Northwestern 
Dental  School.  While  in  active  practice  he  always  kept  in  touch  with  the 
advancement  of  the  profession,  acquainting  himself  with  all  the  latest  im- 
provements, not  only  in  methods  of  practice  but  also  in  the  materials  and  in- 
struments used.  The  work  which  he  did  was  universally  satisfactory  and  a 
liberal  patronage  was  accorded  him,  so  that  as  the  years  passed  he  acquired  ;i 
handsome  competence.  In  1905  he  retired  to  private  life  and  in  1907  removed 
from  Morrison  to  Fulton,  where  he  had  purchased  a  home  that  is  one  of  the 
most  beautiful  residences  in  the  city,  a  comfortable  and  attractive  dwelling, 
being  surrounded  by  a  well  kept  lawn,  adorned  with  many  fine  trees  and 
shrubs.  Here  he  expects  to  spend  his  remaining  days,  enjoying  the  com- 
forts of  life  that  his  former  labor  and  skill  have  provided. 

Dr.  Kirk  is  a  member  of  Dunlap  Lodge,  No.  321,  A.  F.  &  A.  M.,  of  Mor- 
rison: of  Grove  Lodge,  No.  257,  I.  0.  0.  F.,  of  Morrison;  and  of  Primrose 
Chapter,  No.  363,  O.  E.  S.  He  has  filled  all  of  the  chairs  in  both  the  Masonic 
and  Odd  Fellows  lodges  and  is  in  thorough  sympathy  with  the  principles  up- 
on which  these  orders  are  based.  He  takes  no  very  active  interest  in  politics, 
although  he  has  served  as  a  member  of  the  board*  of  aldermen  of  Morrison  for 
one  term  and  always  keeps  well  informed  on  the  questions  and  issues  of  the 
day.  His  advancement  in  his  chosen  field  of  labor  was  attributable  entirely  to 
his  close  application,  his  native  skill  and  his  acquired  ability.  He  always 
held  high  ideals  in  his  professional  work  and  as  the  years  passed  gained  well 
merited  success. 


SAMUEL  ALBERTSON. 

Samuel  Albertson,  who  is  now  living  retired  in  Sterling,  was  for  many 
years  closely  associated  with  the  agricultural  interests  of  Whiteside  county 
and  in  the  capable  control  of  his  business  affairs,  his  unfaltering  diligence 
and  his  unflagging  enterprise,  lies  the  secret  of  the  success  to  which  he  at- 
tained. He  was  born  in  the  town  of  Clinton,  Dutchess  county,  New  York, 
January  18,  1818,  his  parents  being  Joseph  and  Elizabeth  (Ham)  Albertson, 
likewise  natives  of  the  Empire  state.  Of  their  family  of  thirteen  children 
the  subject  of  this  review  is  the  only  one  who  survives.  The  father  was  a 
farmer  and  in  1832  removed  from  Dutchess  county  to  Monroe  county,  New 
York,  settling  in  the  vicinity  of  Rochester,  where  he  lived  for  about  ten 
years.  There  he  passed  away  in  1842  at  the  age  of  sixty-eight  years.  His 
wife  survived  him  for  a  considerable  period  and  died  at  the  age  of  eighty- 
four.  They  were  consistent  and  faithful  members  of  the  Society  of  Friends, 


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UNIVERSITY  OF  ILLINOIS 


HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY  813 

their  lives  being  in  harmony  with  the  teachings  of  that  sect,  and  Mr.  Albert- 
son  was  a  minister  of  the  faith  and  built  up  the  society  in  his  home  com- 
munity. 

In  tracing  back  the  ancestral  history  of  Mr.  Albertson  it  is  found  that 
his  grandfather,  Isaac  Albertson,  also  a  native  of  New  York,  was  a  farmer  and 
mechanic  there.  He  wedded  Mary  Cheesman  and  died  in  1817  in  middle 
life,  while  his  wife  survived  until  about  1826.  They  were  parents  of  five 
sons.  The  family  comes  .originally  from  Holland  Dutch  ancestry.  The 
maternal  grandfather  of  Samuel  Albertson  was  Frederick  Ham,  a  native  of 
the  state  of  New  York  and  of  German  descent.  He  was  a  farmer,  providing 
for  a  large  family,  consisting  of  his  wife,  Mrs.  Mary  Ham,  a  number  of 
daughters  and  one  son,  through  his  work  as  a  tiller  of  the  soil. 

When  a  youth  of  fourteen  years  Samuel  Albertson  accompanied  his 
parents  on  their  removal  to  western  New  York,  the  journey  to  Monroe  county, 
that  state,  being  made  before  the  era  of  railroad  building.  He  was  reared 
to  manhood  in  Monroe  county  and  acquired  a  common-school  education  in 
the  early  schools  of  the  neighborhood.  He  was  reared  to  farm  life,  early 
becoming  familiar  with  the  duties  and  labors  that  fall  to  the  lot  of  the 
agriculturist,  and  throughout  his  business  career  he  made  the  cultivation  of 
the  fields  his  principal  occupation.  The  opportunities  of  the  growing  west 
attracted  him  and  in  1841  he  came  to  Sterling.  He  had  two  brothers,  Isaac 
and  John  Albertson,  twins,  who  had  preceded  him,  arriving  in  1835.  Each 
took  up  a  claim  to  a  half  section  of  land  and  improved  part  of  it,  but  the 
work  of  Isaac  Albertson  was  cut  short  by  death  in  1845.  His  brother  John, 
however,  survived  until  1872. 

On  reaching  Illinois,  Samuel  Albertson  purchased  eighty  acres  from 
his  brother  John  and  also  eight  acres  of  timber  land.  With  characteristic 
energy  he  began  to  improve  his  farm  and  made  his  home  thereon  for  ten 
years.  He  then  sold  the  property  and  bought  two  hundred  acres  which  had 
formerly  belonged  to  his  brother  Isaac.  He  still  lives  upon  this  place,  but 
has  sold  all  but  fifty  acres.  For  a  long  period  he  carried  on  the  work  of 
cultivating  the  fields  and  harvesting  the  crops,  but  at  length  turned  his  atten- 
tion to  utilizing  what  is  known  as  the  Woodlawn  Spring  for  commercial 
purposes.  It  was  found  that  the  waters  of  this  spring  were  good  for  stomach 
trouble  and  rheumatism  and  proved  beneficial  when  used  for  baths.  For 
about  twenty  years  Mr.  Albertson  then  conducted  a  sanitarium,  which  was 
patronized  by  people  from  many  states.  At  the  age  of  eighty  years,  however, 
he  sold  the  springs  and  has  since  lived  retired  upon  the  farm  in  the  enjoy- 
ment of  a  rest  which  he  has  truly  earned  and  richly  merits. 

It  was  on  the  5ih  of  November,  1839,  that  Samuel  Albertson  was  mar- 
ried to  Miss  Hannah  DeGarmo,  a  daughter  of  Elias  and  Clemmie  (Powell) 
DeGarmo.  They  became  the  parents  of  two  daughters  and  a  son.  Harriet, 
the  eldest,  is  the  wife  of  Owen  N.  Hurst,  residing  near  Salina,  Kansas. 
Arthur  died  at  the  age  of  twenty-four  years  as  the  result  of  being  thrown 
from  a  horse.  Ella  is  the  deceased  wife  of  John  E.  Woodyatt  and  they  had 
three  children:  Arthur,  who  married  Edna  Kelsey,  and  they  have  two 
children,  Dorothy  and  Albert;  Grace,  the  wife  of  Harry  Hoover,  of  Sterling 


814  HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY 

township,  by  whom  she  has  one  son,  Russell;  and  Lulu  May,  the  wife  of 
Roy  R.  Baer,  a  resident  of  Sterling,  by  whom  she  has  two  children,  Donald 
and  Luella.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Owen  N.  Hurst  had  twins,  Anna  and  a  son.  The 
former  married  Charles  Kerr  and  they  have  nine  or  ten  children. 

In  1902  Mr.  Albertson  was  called  upon  to  mourn  the  loss  of  his  wife, 
who  died  on  the  10th  of  June  of  that  year  when  nearly  eighty-three  years  of 
age.  She  belonged  to  the  Society  of  Friends,  while  Mr.  Albertson  is  a  Spirit- 
ualist. Politically  he  has  always  been  independent.  In  community  affairs 
he  has  taken  a  deep  and  helpful  interest,  aiding  in  organizing  the  schools 
and  serving  for  many  years  as  school  director.  He  has  also  been  highway 
commissioner  and  was  treasurer  of  the  board,  helping  to  put  up  the  first 
steel  bridge  that  was  built  in  the  county,  across  the  Elkhorn  near  the  Pen- 
nington  farm.  He  has  been  a  resident  of  Whiteside  county  for  sixty-six 
years  and  has  witnessed  its  development  from  a  wilderness  to  its  present  state 
of  progress.  His  life  in  many  of  its  phases  has  commanded  for  him  the 
unqualified  confidence  and  respect  of  his  fellowmen,  and  he  is  justly  ac- 
counted one  of  Whiteside  county's  worthy  citizens,  his  history  proving  an 
important  chapter  in  its  annals. 


LEWIS  REITZEL. 

Lewis  Reitzel,  a  substantial  business  man  of  Sterling,  conducting  a  flour 
and  feed  store  and  also  operating  a  mill  for  grinding,  was  born  near  Cham- 
bersburg,  Pennsylvania,  at  Rock  Spring  Mill.  January  1,  1865.  His  paternal 
grandfather,  Henry  Reitzel,  also  a  native  of  .Pennsylvania,  lived  in  Lancaster 
county  and  was  a  miller  by  trade.  He  died  there  at  an  advanced  age,  having 
for  some  years  survived  his  wife.  The  family  numbered  eight  children.  The 
original  American  ancestors  came  from  Switzerland,  settling  in  Pennsylvania 
at  an  early  period  in  the  colonization  of  the  new  world. 

Jacob  Reitzel,  father  of  Lewis  Reitzel,  was  born  in  the  Keystone  state  and 
was  reared  upon  the  farm  but  became  a  miller.  The  year  1865  witnessed  his 
arrival  in  Whiteside  county,  Illinois,  after  which  he  followed  farming  in 
Hopkins  township,  and  later  bought  a  farm  in  Sterling  township,  north  of  the 
city  of  Sterling,  owning  and  cultivating  eighty  acres  there.  After  his  chil- 
dren had  reached  adult  age  he  sold  that  property  and  bought  a  small  farm 
in  the  same  township,  upon  which  he  made  his  home  until  his  death.  He 
died  in  February,  1899,  while  his  wife  passed  away  in  December  of  the  same 
year.  They  were  Mennonites  in  religious  faith.  Mrs.  Reitzel  bore  the  maiden 
name  of  Susan  Rutt,  and  was  also  a  native  of  Pennsylvania,  as  were  her  par- 
ents. Her  father,  a  farmer  by  occupation,  died  in  that  state  at  an  advanced  age 
and  his  wife  had  reached  a  ripe  old  age  when  called  to  her  final  rest.  Unto 
Mr.  and  Mrs.  Reitzel  were  born  nine  children,  four  sons  and  five  daughters: 
Martha,  deceased;  Mary  Ann,  the  wife  of  Noah  S.  Loux,  of  Sterling;  Sabina. 
the  wife  of  Abram  L.  Brubaker.  of  this  city;  Susan,  the  wife  of  Christian  E. 
Goshert;  Henry  R: :  Abram  R. ;  Sarah,  the  wife  of  Philip  Nice;  Jacob  R. ;  and 
Lewis. 


HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY  815 

The  last  named  was  but  eight  weeks  old  when  the  parents  brought  their 
family  to  Whiteside  county  and  here  he  was  reared  to  manhood  upon  the 
home  farm.  He  attended  the  district  schools  and  the  Sterling  Business  Col- 
lege, and  in  the  interval  between  the  two  courses  of  study  he  learned  the 
miller's  trade.  After  completing  his  commercial  course  he  bought  the  flour 
and  feed  store  which  he  has  conducted  continuously  and  successfully  since 
December,  1888.  At  that  time  his  location  was  a  small  frame  building  but 
he  has  since  erected  a  large  brick  business  block  and  put  in  a  mill  where  he  does 
grinding  in  connection  with  selling.  For  twenty  years  a  business  man  of 
Sterling,  he  has  made  an  excellent  record  in  trade  circles  for  reliability  as  well 
as  enterprise  and  has  proven  that  success  and  an  honorable  name  may  be  won 
simultaneously. 

On  the  27th  of  May,  1891,  Mr.  Reitzel  was  married  to  Miss  May  Sigler, 
a  daughter  of  Samuel  and  Catharine  (Wink)  Sigler,  who  were  natives  of 
Pennsylvania.  The  mother  came  west  with  her  parents  when  a  maiden  of 
eight  years  and  settled  in  Linn  county,  Iowa,  where  she  was  reared  to  woman- 
hood and  married.  Mr.  Sigler  had  arrived  in  the  middle  west  when  twenty- 
one  years  of  age,  taking  up  his  abode  in  Bureau  county,  Illinois,  and  at  the 
outbreak  of  the  Civil  war  he  put  aside  business  and  personal  considerations, 
enlisted  in  defense  of  the  Union,  at  Galva,  on  the  28th  of  May,  1861,  as  a 
member  of  Company  D,  Seventeenth  Illinois  Volunteer  Infantry,  serving  for 
three  years  with  that  company  and  was  honorably  discharged  on  the  4th  of 
June,  1864.  He  then  re-enlisted  on  the  17th  of  September,  1864,  as  a 
member  of  Company  H,  One  Hundred  and  Forty-sixth  Illinois  Volunteer  In- 
fantry, and  was  honorably  discharged  July  8,  1865,  with  the  rank  of  second 
lieutenant.  After  the  war  he  went  to  Lisbon,  Iowa,  where  he  lived  until  1871, 
when  he  came  to  Sterling  and  for  two  years'  worked  at  the  harnessmaker's- 
trade.  He  afterward  became  an  employe  in  the  McCune  pump  factory,  where 
he  remained  for  twelve  years,  after  which  he  capably  and  faithfully  served  for 
sixteen  years  as  janitor  of  the  Sterling  school.  In  the  month  which  witnessed 
his  return  from  the  war  Mr.  Sigler  was  married  to  Miss  Catharine  Wink,  who 
died  in  1884,  at  the  age  of  thirty-seven  years.  He  long  survived  her,  passing 
away  in  May,  1906,  at  the  age  of  sixty-seven  years.  He  had  served  as  captain 
of  the  fire  department  of  Sterling  for  twelve  and  a  half  years  and  was  one  of 
the  best  known  and  most  highly  esteemed  citizens  here.  His  nature  was 
kindly  and  genial,  and  the  children  as  well  as  the  older  people  were  his  friends. 
He  was  one  of  a  family  of  thirteen  children,  seven  of  whom  are  living,  and  his 
parents  died  in  Pennsylvania  when  well  advanced  in  years.  His  wife  was  a 
daughter  of  Samuel  and  Theresa  (Goodman)  Wink,  of  Reading,  Pennsylva- 
nia, who  died  in  Iowa  at  an  advanced  age.  They  had  two  children :  Catha- 
rine, who  became  Mrs.  Sigler;  and  Emma,  who  is  still  living. 

Throughout  the  period  of  their  married  life  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Reitzel  have 
lived  in  Sterling.  They  are  active  and  faithful  members  of  St.  John's  Luth- 
eran church  and  for  eight  years  Mr.  Reitzel  served  as  one  of  its  deacons,  while 
for  twenty  years  Mrs.  Reitzel  has  been  a  teacher  in  the  primary  department  in 
the  Sunday  school.  His  political  allegiance  is  given  to  the  republican  party 
but  the  honors  and  emoluments  of  office  have  had  no  attraction  for  him,  as 


816  HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY 

he  has  always  preferred  to  give  his  undivided  attention  to  his  business  interests. 
There  has  been  no  esoteric  phase  in  his  career;  on  the  contrary  his  entire  rec- 
ord is  as  an  open  book  which  all  may  read.  Through  two  decades  he  has  been 
associated  with  the  industrial  and  commercial  interests  of  Sterling  and  his 
name  has  become  a  synonym  for  reliable  dealing  in  this  city. 


JAMES  POLK  HOPKINS. 

Among  the  younger  and  more  enterprising  farmers  of  Hopkins  town- 
ship, is  numbered  James  Polk  Hopkins,  a  representative  of  one  of  the  hon- 
ored pioneer  families  of  Illinois.  He  was  born  October  11,  1881,  his  parents 
being  James  Polk  and  Asenath  (Lament)  Hopkins,  the  former  a  native  of 
Whiteside  county,  and  the  latter  of  Toronto,  Canada.  Jason  Hopkins,  the 
paternal  grandfather  of  our  subject,  was  a  native  of  Nashville,  Tennessee, 
born  June  27,  1899.  He  resided  in  his  native  city  until  he  had  reached  mid- 
dle age,  when  he  came  to  Illinois  because  of  the  anti-slavery  principles  which 
he  entertained,  settling  at  Belleville,  this  state.  He  afterward  removed  to . 
Peoria  and  at  a  later  date  became  a  resident  of  Whiteside  county.  He  served 
as  a  soldier  of  the  Black  Hawk  war,  becoming  a  volunteer  in  a  cavalry  regi- 
ment, in  which  he  was  appointed  quartermaster,  holding  that  position  through- 
out the  continuance  of  hostilities  that  led  to  the  subjugation  of  the  fed  race  and 
caused  their  removal  from  this  section  of  the  country  to  districts  farther  west. 
At  the  close  of  the  war,  in  the  autumn  of  1832,  as  the  troops  were  returning 
to  their  homes,  Mr.  Hopkins,  with  others,  came  to  the  Rock  river,  and  in  coast- 
ing along  its  banks  reached  the  present  site  of  the  village  of  Como.  Being 
impressed  with  the  beauty  of  the  place  he  made  a  claim,  covering  the  entire 
tract  known  in  pioneer  parlance  as  a  jack  knife  claim,  by  cutting  his  name 
in  the  bark  of  the  trees,  showing  the  boundary  of  his  line.  Mr.  Hopkins 
always  regarded  this  location  as  beautiful  as  the  garden  of  Eden.  It  has, 
indeed,  much  natural  attraction  of  a  scenic  character,  while  the  resources  of 
the  farm  were  many  because  of  the  richness  and  productiveness  of  the  soil. 
He  was  married  in  Peoria,  Illinois,  to  Miss  Elenora  Johnson,  who  was  born 
December  29,  1801,  near  Bowling  Green,  Kentucky.  With  his  bride  he  re- 
turned to  Whiteside  county  in  1835  and  surveyed  the  claim,  establishing 
the  boundaries  by  marking  trees  in  the  timber  and  running  furrows  across 
the  prairie  with  the  plow  and  ox  team.  When  the  land  came  into  market 
he  purchased  his  claim,  comprising  sections  25,  26,  35  and  36,  Hopkins  town- 
ship, and  also  some  land  adjoining,  making  in  all  about  thirty-two  hundred 
acres.  He  built  the  first  log  cabin  in  the  township  which  bears  his  name, 
and  thus  planted  the  seeds  of  civilization  in  a  region  hitherto  the  domain 
of  the  savage.  He  possessed  many  sterling  traits  of  character,  was  a  man 
of  firm  purpose,  unswerving  integrity  and  loyalty  and  of  unfaltering  patriot- 
ism. He  was  an  intimate  acquaintance  and  a  great  admirer  of  General  Jack- 
son. In  the  community  where  he  lived  he  became  an  influential  factor.  He 
was  well  fitted  to  cope  with  the  conditions  of  pioneer  life  and  in  laboring  for 
his  community  looked  beyond  the  exigencies  of  the  moment  to  the  possibili- 


HISTORY    OF   WHITESIDE    COUNTY  817 

ties  of  the  future  and  builded  for  later  days  as  well  as  for  his  own  time. 
He  died  August  19,  1853,  and  thus  passed  away  one  who  had  been  instrumental 
in  laying  the  foundation  for  the  present  prosperity  and  progress  of  the  county. 
The  work  that  he  did  in  reclaiming  this  wild  region  will  always  be  remem- 
bered, inasmuch  as  the  township  in  which  he  first  settled  bears  his  name-^-an 
honor  that  he  well  merited.  His  wife  passed  away  May  13,  1858,  having 
survived  him  for  about  five  years.  Their  children  were  William  T.,  Helen, 
Francis  and  James  P.  The  first  named  was  the  first  white  male  child  born  in 
Whiteside  county,  and  his  death  occurred  about  1862. 

James  P.  Hopkins,  father  of  our  subject,  was  the  youngest  son  of  Jason 
Hopkins  and  was  born  upon  the  old  homestead  claim  in  Hopkins  township, 
October  4,  1843.  He  was  but  ten  years  of  age  when  his  father  died.  He  has 
lived  all  his  life  at  Como,  with  the  exception  of  the  time  which  he  spent  in 
military  service  of  his  country.  His  patriotic  spirit  aroused,  he  responded 
to  the  call  of  the  Union  and  enlisted  on  the  2d  of  September,  1862,  in  the 
Seventy-fifth  regiment  of  Illinois  Volunteers.  He  continued  in  the  service 
throughout  the  war,  and  was  honorably  discharged  in  July,  1865.  He  par- 
ticipated in  the  battles  of  Atlanta,  Murfreesboro,  Chickamauga,  Lookout 
Mountain  and  various  others,  which  contributed  to  the  result  that  finally 
crowned  the  Union  arms.  Although  frequently  in  the  thickest  of  the  fight 
he  escaped  without  serious  injury.  On  his  return  to  his  home  he  resumed  his 
former  occupation  of  farming,  and  in  the  community  was  recognized  as  a 
citizen  of  value  and  public  spirit.  He  was  devoted  to  the  principles  of  the 
republican  party,  which  stood  as  the  defense  of  the  federal  government  in 
the  dark  days  of  the  Civil  war,  and  which  has  always  been  the  party  of  re- 
form, progress  and  improvement.  He  was  always  active  in  support  of  the 
schools  and  of  other  local  interests  calculated  to  prove  of  public  benefit.  On 
the  30th  of  November,  1869,  at  Atkinson,  Henry  county,  Illinois,  he  was 
married  to  Miss  Asenath  H.  Lament,  a  daughter  of  Donald  and  Mary  (Lloyd) 
Lamont.  Her  father  was  born  in  Scotland  and  her  mother  in  Canada.  They 
were  married  in  the  Dominion,  where  they  resided  for  a  short  time  before 
coming  to  Illinois  in  1865,  at  which  time  they  took  up  their  abode  in  Hop- 
kins township,  Whiteside  county.  Their  children  were  Asenath  H.,  Flora 
A.,  John,  Jesse  L.,  Susanna,  Elizabeth  J.,  Charity,  Washington  M.,  Emily  I. 
and  Martha  I.  Mi's.  Hopkins  was  born  November  2,  1842,  and  by  her  mar- 
riage became  the  mother  of  five  children,  Elnora  M.,  Jessie  L.,  Anna  F.r 
Eunice  B.  and  James  P.,  Jr. 

The  last  named  resides  upon  the  old  homestead  and  is  one  of  the  ener- 
getic, aggressive  young  farmers  of  the  county.  In  addition  to  tilling  the  soil 
in  the  production  of  the  crops  best  adapted  to  climatic  conditions  here,  he 
also  makes  a  specialty  of  the  raising  of  Poland  China  hogs,  and  likewise 
handles  a  good  many  horses.  The  house  which  stands  here  was  erected  many 
years  ago,  and  is  one  of  the  old  landmarks  of  the  county.  It  is  finished  in 
black  walnut,  and  also  some  butternut  wood — woods  which  are  today  almost 
priceless.  The  farm  is  well  cultivated,  is  neat  and  thrifty  in  its  appearance 
in  every  department,  and  indicates  the  careful  supervision  and  practical 
methods  of  the  owner. 


818  HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY 

James  P.  Hopkins  of  this  review  is  a  member  of  the  Fraternal  Life,  as- 
sociated with  Gait  Lodge,  No.  135.  He  votes  the  republican  ticket,  and 
though  keeping  well  informed  on  the  questions  and  issues  of  the  day,  has 
never  sought  office  as  a  reward  for  party  fealty.  His  mother  resides  with 
him  and  is  an  interesting  and  beautiful  character.  Their  home,  although 
one  of  the  old  residences  of  the  county,  has  been  well  preserved  during  all 
these  years  and  is  a  comfortable  dwelling.  The  name  of  Hopkins  has,  from 
pioneer  times,  been  an  honored  one  in  this  section  of  the  state.  The  work 
begun  by  the  grandfather  and  carried  on  by  the  father  is  now  being  con- 
tinued by  the  son,  who  is  justly  classed  with  the  representative  agriculturists 
.and  reliable  business  men  of  his  community. 


HON.  JOHN  G.  PRICE. 

The  life  of  John  G.  Price  has  been  largely  devoted  to  the  public  service, 
.and  he  has  made  an  excellent  record  as  a  valiant  soldier,  as  an  able  lawyer 
and  as  one  who,  in  connection  with  the  military  posts  of  the  country,  has 
«ver  enjoyed  the  good  will  and  confidence  of  the  boys  in  blue.  Moreover,  in 
the  Arkansas  legislature  he  stood  for  wise  laws,  looking  beyond  the  exigen- 
cies of  the  moment  to  the  possibilities,  needs  and  opportunities  of  the  future. 

He  was  born  in  Fairfield,  Franklin  county,  Indiana,  December  8,  1831, 
his  parents  being  Andrew  B.  and  Abigail  B.  (Mann)  Price,  natives  of  Ohio 
and  Kentucky,  respectively.  The  Price  family  comes  of  Welsh  lineage.  The 
paternal  grandfather,  John  Price,  was  a  native  of  Kentucky  and  made  his 
home  for  some  years  in  Hart  county.  He  died  in  1868,  having  for  some 
years  survived  his  "wife.  Their  only  child  was  Andrew  B.  Price,  who  was 
born  in  Ohio  and  became  a  physician  and  surgeon,  completing  a  course  in 
the  Cincinnati  Medical  College  by  graduation  about  1821.  He  entered  upon 
the  active  practice  of  his  profession  in  Ohio,  living  in  Dayton  and  other 
cities  of  that  state.  He  was  also  located  at  different  times  in  Indiana  and 
Kentucky  and  was  recognized  as  an  able  representative  of  his  profession, 
his  life  proving  of  valued  service  to  his  fellowmen  in  this  regard.  He  was 
also  prominent  in  political  circles,  was  a  member  of  the  Indiana  legislature 
for  several  terms  and  also  represented  his  district  in  the  senate.  He  gave  care- 
ful consideration  to  the  questions  which  came  up  for  settlement  and  left  the 
impress  of  his  individuality  and  keen  political  foresight  upon  the  legislative 
history  of  the  state.  In  early  manhood  he  wedded  Abigail  B.  Mann,  whose 
father  lived  in  Kentucky  and  in  Indiana.  She  was  one  of  a  family  of  three 
daughters  and  one  son,  and  her  death  occurred  in  1846.  Mr.  Price  long  sur- 
vived his  wife,  passing  away  at  Hebron,  Porter  county,  Indiana,  in  1873.  at 
the  age  of  seventy-three  years.  He  was  a  consistent  member  of  the  Baptist 
church  and  a  man  of  high  ideals  whose  life  was  faultless  in  honor,  fearless 
in  conduct  and  stainless  in  reputation. 

John  G.  Price,  the  eldest  in  a  family  of  four  sons  and  two  daughters, 
and  now  the  only  surviving  member  of  the  family,  spent  his  early  boyhood 


HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY  819 

in  Harrodsburg,  Kentucky,  and  after  the  removal  of  the  family  to  Center- 
ville,  Ohio,  began  his  education  there.  Subsequently  he  was  a  student  in  the 
academy  at  Laporte.  Indiana,  and  in  1848  he  martriculated  in  Wabash  Col- 
lege, from  which  he  was  graduated  in  1852.  He  then  removed  to  Valparaiso, 
Indiana,  but  before  leaving  Crawfordsvillc  studied  law  for  four  months  under 
the  direction  of  General  Lew  Wallace. 

From  Valparaiso  Mr.  Price  came  to  Sterling  on  the  4th  of  October,  1853, 
and  continued  his  law  studies  with  Miles  S.  Henry,  who  was  an  uncle  by 
marriage.  In  1858  he  was  admitted  to  the  bar,  the  license  being  signed  by 
Judge  Breese,  who  was  a  very  celebrated  jurist  of  Illinois,  and  he  then  formed 
a  partnership  with  his  former  preceptor,  Mr.  Henry.  During  the  following 
year  Fred  Sacket  was  admitted  to  a  partnership,  and  the  firm  remained 
Henry,  Price  &  Sacket  until  our  subject  entered  the  army. 

In  1861  Mr.  Price  went  to  the  front  as  sutler  for  the  Thirty-first  Illinois 
Volunteer  Infantry,  under  command  of  General  Kirk,  and  in  the  summer 
of  1862  he  raised  Company  H  of  the  Seventy-fifth  Illinois  Volunteer  Infan- 
try, and  was  chosen  its  captain.  With  his  command  he  went  south,  and  the 
first  battle  in  which  he  participated  was  at  Perryville,  Kentucky,  but  in  1863 
was  obliged  to  resign  on  account  of  ill  health.  His  clothing  was  pierced  by 
bullets  and  his  hat  suffered  the  same  fate,  yet  he  never  sustained  a  wound. 
He  took  part  in  the  battles  of  Perryville,  Stone  River,  La  Verne  and  in  a 
number  of  skirmishes,  and  when  mustered  out  returned  to  Sterling,  where  he 
remained  until  June,  1865. 

At  that  date  Mr.  Price  removed  to  Little  Rock,  Arkansas,  where  he  was 
engaged  in  the  practice  of  law  until  1868,  or  until  the  passage  of  the  recon- 
struction act.  He  was  secretary  of  that  constitutional  convention  of  which 
General  Thomas  M.  Bowen  was  president.  About  this  time  he  became  editor 
of  a  daily  paper  called  the  Little  Rock  Dispatch,  which  afterward  became  the 
Little  Rock  Daily  Republican.  While  thus  engaged  in  journalistic  labor 
Mr.  Price  was  nominated,  without  his  knowledge,  as  a  candidate  for  repre- 
sentative in  the  Arkansas  legislature,  and  such  was  his  personal  popularity 
and  the  confidence  reposed  in  him  that  he  was  elected  by  a  majority  of  five 
thousand  and  was  made  speaker  of  the  house  in  the  sessions  of  1868  and  1869. 
During  this  period  Mr.  Price  continued  as  editor  and  owner  of  the  paper,  and 
was  thus  identified  with  journalism  in  Arkansas  until  1874.  During  that 
year  he  was  made  pension  agent  of  Arkansas  and  Indian  Territory,  serving 
about  one  year. 

After  that  time  the  Thirteenth  United  States  Infantry  was  stationed  at 
Little  Rock,  and  in  the  summer  of  1880  was  transferred  to  Fort  Lewis,  Colo- 
rado, to  protect  the  settlers  against  the  Indians.  Mr.  Price  was  then  appointed 
post  trader  there  by  the  secretary  of  war,  and  filled  that  position  until  1890, 
or  until  the  disbandment  of  the  post.  In  1888  he  was  elected  to  the  Colo- 
rado legislature  and  served  for  one  term  of  two  years.  While  acting  as  post 
trader  he  had  purchased  a  four  hundred  acre  ranch,  and  in  addition  to  the 
t-ultivation  of  the  land  he  engaged  in  breeding  mid  raising  fine  cattle — the 
Cruikshank  strain  of  Durhams.  In  1890  he  removed  to  Durango,  Colorado, 
where  he  lived  until  1892,  and  there  began  the  practice  of  law,  continuing 


820  HISTORY    OF    WH1TESIDE    COUNTY 

at  that  town  until  1907,  when  he  returned  to  Sterling  to  spend  the  winter, 
having  closed  out  all  of  his  interests  in  Colorado. 

On  the  14th  of  September,  1869,  Mr.  Price  was  married,  in  Philadel- 
phia, Pennsylvania,  to  Miss  Mary  B.  Smith,  a  daughter  of  S.  Lehman  Smith 
and  Hester  Syng  (Barnes)  Smith.  They  had  one  daughter,  Annie  Knight 
Price.  The  mother,  who  was  a  faithful  and  consistent  member  of  the  Epis- 
copal church,  died  March  14,  1893.  The  daughter  is  the  wife  of  Percy  Lee 
Richtmyer  and  they  reside  in  Chicago. 

Mr.  Price  was  made  a  Mason  in  Sterling  in  1856,  and  the  following  year 
took  the  Royal  Arch  degrees,  since  which  time  he  has  twice  served  as  high 
priest  of  the  chapter,  and  has  held  offices  in  the  lodge.  He  also  belongs  to 
McPherson  Post,  G.  A.  R.,  at  Little  Rock,  Arkansas.  While  living  in  Ster- 
ling many  years  ago  he  filled  the  office  of  city  attorney  for  two  terms  and  was 
also  mayor  for  one  term.  His  political  allegiance  was  given  to  the  republican 
party  for  many  years,  and  in  fact  he  continued  with  that  party  until  1898, 
when  he  withdrew  and  became  a  Bryan  democrat.  He  is  now  living  retired, 
makins;  his  home  in  Sterling,  to  which  city  he  came  in  an  early  day  more 
than  a  half  century  ago. 


JACOB  GARWICK. 

• 

The  history  of  Clyde  township  would  be  incomplete  without  the  record  of 
Jacob  Garwick,  a  man  whom  to  know  was  to  respect,  because  his  life  was 
active,  useful  and  honorable.  He  started  out  for  himself  empty-handed  and 
for  many  years  struggled  earnestly  to  gain  a  substantial  position  in  the  busi- 
ness world.  The  methods  which  he  followed  were  ever  honorable  and  upright 
and  thus  in  his  death,  which  occurred  October  21,  1895,  Whiteside  county 
lost  a  valued  citizen.  He  is  well  remembered  as  a  progressive  farmer  living 
on  section  2,  Clyde  township,  and  also  as  a  minister.  That  his  business  inter- 
ests were  capably  managed  is  indicated  by  the  fact  that  he  left  a  valuable 
estate  of  three  hundred  acres  lying  partly  in  Carroll  county  and  still  carried 
on  by  his  widow. 

The  birth  of  Jacob  Garwick  occurred  December  13,  1834,  in  Alsace, 
which  was  then  a  province  of  France,  but  has  since  reverted  to  Germany,  the 
original  owner.  His  father,  Jacob  Garwick,  Sr.,  was  also  a  native  of  that 
province  and  was  of  German  parentage.  In  that  country  he  learned  and 
followed  the  miller's  trade.  In  early  manhood  he  wedded  Magdalene  Wolff, 
who  was  of  French  and  Swiss  lineage.  Both  of  her  grandsires  came  to  Amer- 
ica during  the  progress  of  the  Revolutionary  war  under  the  command  of 
General  LaFayette  and  served  on  his  corps  of  officers.  Several  other  male 
relatives  were  among  the  French  soldiery  who  came  to  assist  the  colonies  in 
their  struggle  for  independence.  Jacob  Garwick,  Sr.,  came  to  the  United 
States  with  his  wife  and  children  in  1853  and  located  upon  a  farm  in  Butler 
county,  Pennsylvania.  His  son  Jacob  was  the  eldest  of  his  children  and  left 
his  native  province  in  November,  1852,  arriving  in  Pennsylvania  a  year  prior 


LIBRARY 

OF  THE 

UNIVERSITY  OF  ILLINOIS 


HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY  823 

to  his  parents.  In  his  native  country  he  had  been  liberally  educated  in  the 
German  and  French  languages  and  for  some  time  acted  as  an  assistant  teacher 
in  the  schools  where  he  had  been  a  student.  He  spent  three  months  on 
shipboard  on  his  way  to  America,  not  knowing  a  single  soul  on  the  vessel. 
The  entire  period  was  one  of  storm  and  peril,  the  food  supply  became  ex- 
hausted and  distress  signals  were  flown  from  the  masthead  three  successive 
days  before  their  condition  was  discovered.  They  then  anchored  near  an 
island  in  the  South  sea  belonging  to  Portugal  and  secured  sufficient  supplies 
to  enable  them  to  proceed  on  their  voyage.  At  length,  however,  the  long  trip 
was  ended  and  Mr.  Garwick  landed  safely  in  the  new  world.  Here  he  made 
preparation  for  a  home  for  his  parents  and  when  he  saw  them  comfortably 
settled  he  started  for  Illinois.  When  he  reached  Chicago  he  had  not  enough 
money  to  pay  for  his  breakfast,  but  he  succeeded  in  making  his  way  to  friends 
in  Dupage  county,  where  he  obtained  aid  and  employment.  In  1854  he 
located  in  Clyde  township,  Whiteside  county,  and  three  years  later  his  father's 
family  followed  him  to  Illinois  and  took  up  their  abode  upon  a  farm  at  Fair 
Haven,  Carroll  county.  There  the  father  died  in  June,  1878,  while  the 
mother  survived  until  May,  1884. 

After  coming  to  Illinois  Jacob  Garwick,  of  this  review,  worked  as  a 
general  laborer,  but  while  in  Pennsylvania  he  followed  the  miller's  trade, 
which  he  had  learned  under  the  direction  of  his  father  in  his  native  country. 
His  life  to  the  age  of  twenty-seven  years  was  one  of  continual  hardship  and 
toil,  but  he  possessed  strong  determination  and  unfaltering  courage  and  grad- 
ually worked  his  way  upward.  After  his  arrival  in  Whiteside  county  he  be- 
came a  farm  hand  and  was  thus  employed  until  he  could  make  arrangement 
to  purchase  land  and  engaged  in  farming  on  his  own  account. 

As  a  companion  and  helpmate  for  life's  journey  Mr.  Garwick  chose  Miss 
Sarah  Zook,  whom  he  wedded  in  Clyde  township  on  the  27th  of  February, 
1861.  Her  parents,  Abraham  and  Anna  (Gsell)  Zook,  were  natives  of  Lan- 
caster county,  Pennsylvania,  and  of  Swiss  and  German  descent.  Their  an- 
cestors settled  in  America  about  the  time  of  the  colonial  struggle  for  inde- 
pendence. Mr.  and  Mrs.  Zook  were  farming  people  and  were  married  in 
Franklin  county,  Pennsylvania,  their  daughter  Sarah  being  there  born  'on 
the  19th  of  January,  1843.  She  was  one  of  a  family  of  eight  children  and 
accompanied  her  parents  to  Illinois  when  she  was  thirteen  years  of  age. 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  Garwick  first  settled  in  Newton  township,  Whiteside  county, 
and  two  years  later  removed  to  Clyde  township,  establishing  their  home  on  the 
farm  where  Mrs.  Garwick  has  since  remained,  now  owning  three  hundred  and 
fifty-five  acres  of  land.  Of  the  children  born  unto  them  the  six  who  still  sur- 
vive are  as  follows:  George  E.,  the  eldest,  who  now  follows  farming  near 
Garden  Plain,  this  county,  acquired  a  college  education  and  married  a  daugh- 
ter of  Henry  Brubaker.  They  have  three  children — Floyd,  Florence  and 
Eber.  Anna  Garwick  is  the  wife  of  William  Geesey,  and  resides  at  home. 
They,  too,  have  three  living  children — Hattie,  Jacob  and  Ethel — and  they 
lost  one  child,  Lucille,  at  the  age  of  four  years.  Sarah  Garwick  became  the 
wife  of  Martin  Hanna,  of  Carroll  county,  and  has  two  children — Paul  and 


824  HISTORY    OF   WHITESIDE    COUNTY 

Lenora.  Lizzie  is  the  wife  of  Charles  Dial,  of  Carroll  county,  and  they  have 
one  adopted  child,  Charles.  Dora  is  the  wife  of  J.  0.  Elwing,  a  resident  of 
West  Union,  Iowa,  and  has  one  son,  Lillo.  Katie  is  the  wife  of  Dr.  Cecil  R. 
Rogers,  an  osteopathic  practitioner  of  New  York  city.  Of  the  children  who 
have  passed  away  Edith  Esther,  born  November  25,  1885,  died  at  the  age  of 
eight  years  and  eight  days.  William  H.  died  at  the  age  of  fifteen  years,  and 
Abraham  and  Lena  died  at  the  age  of  five  and  three  years,  respectively. 

When  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Garwick  came  to  what  is  now  the  old  home  farm 
he  invested  twenty-five  dollars,  his  entire  capital,  in  the  property,  and  made 
arrangements  for  future  payments.  Soon,  as  the  result  of  his  earnest  and 
unremitting  labor,  he  was  enabled  to  discharge  his  financial  obligations  and 
had  his  seventy-acre  tract  of  land  free  from  debt.  He  then  added  to  the  place 
from  time  to  time  until  at  his  -demise  he  had  a  splendid  tract  of  land  of  three 
hundred  acres,  richly  improved,  in  the  midst  of  which  he  had  erected  a 
beautiful  residence.  He  also  provided  ample  shelter  for  grain  and  stock  and 
his  farm  was  one  of  the  best  improved  of  the  locality.  He  was  also  largely 
interested  in  the  raising  of  high-grade  cattle,  making  a  specialty  of  short- 
horns. His  entire  acreage  was  wholly  unbroken  at  the  date  of  purchase  and 
the  splendid  appearance  of  his  place  represented  years  of  earnest  labor  and 
unfaltering  diligence.  He  won  his  success  by  the  most  honorable  methods 
and  his  entire  life  was  in  harmony  with  the  principles  of  Christian  religion. 
He  was  for  some  time  a  local  minister  of  the  Evangelical  church,  but  later 
united  with  the  Brethren  in  Christ  church.  He  lived  peaceably  with  his 
fellowmen  and  his  life  was  in  many  respects  an  example  well  worthy  of  emu- 
lation. He  was  faithful  in  friendship  and  devoted  to  the  welfare  of  his  fam- 
ily, and  thus  his  death  brought  great  sadness  to  the  community  in  which  he 
so  long  resided.  Mrs.  Garwick  still  survives  her  husband  and  resides  upon 
the  old  home  farm,  giving  to  it  her  personal  supervision.  She,  too,  has  many 
friends  in  the  community  and  is  well  known  here. 


MARTHA  A.  JOHN. 

"Not  the  good  that  comes  to  us  but  the  good  that  comes  to  the  world 
through  us  is  the  measure  of  our  success"  and  judged  by  this  standard  the  life 
of  Martha  A.  John  has  been  a  most  successful  one.  She  is  now  living  on  a 
farm  on  section  23,  Jordan  township,  which  is  the  old  family  homestead, 
but  for- many  years  she  was  closely  associated  with  the  educational  history  of 
the  county  and  did  much  to  develop  the  school  interests  and  to  promote  the 
intellectual  advancement  of  the  communities  in  which  she  was  employed. 
She  always  held  to  high  ideals  in  her  school  work,  was  constantly  endeavoring 
to  raise  the  standard  of  education  and  there,  are  today  many  in  the  county 
who  acknowledge  their  indebtedness  to  her  for  her  intellectual  training  and 
her  uplifting  influence. 

She  was  born  in  Northumberland  county,  Pennsylvania,  September  11, 
1830,  a  daughter  of  Elida  and  Sarah  (Hughes)  John,  who  were  also  natives  of 


HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY  825 

the  Keystone  state.  Her  father  came  to  Illinois  at  an  advanced  age  and  after- 
ward lived  practically  retired  yet  never  ceased  to  feel  a  deep  interest  in  the 
world's  progress,  in  the  affairs  of  government  and  in  all  those  questions  affect- 
ing the  interests  of  the  individual  and  the  country  at  large.  He  was  a  man  firm 
and  fearless  in  support  of  his  honest  convictions.  Born  in  1805,  his  school  priv- 
ileges were  meager  but  he  was  ambitious  for  intellectual  advancement  and  used 
every  opportunity  for  mental  training  and  discipline.  He  became  in  the  course 
of  years  a  well  informed  man,  recognized  in  every  community  in  which  he 
lived  as  a  citizen  of  intelligence  and  solid  worth.  When  still  quite  young  he 
became  a  teacher  and  following  his  marriage  followed  that  profession,  at  one 
time  conducting  a  school  in  a  part  of  his  residence.  He  was  careful  that 
from  their  infancy  his  own  children  should  be  taught  and  his  wife  shared 
with  him  in  his  ambitions  for  their  educational  progress.  When  the  free 
school  system  was  established  in  Pennsylvania  he  was  elected  a  member  of  the 
first  board  of  school  directors  in  Shamokin  township,  Northumberland  county, 
and  with  the  other  members  of  the  board  labored  faithfully  and  untiringly  to 
divide  the  large  wooded,  hilly  township  into  suitable  districts  and  to  supply 
each  with  a  competent  teacher.  He  also  inspected  the  building  of  many 
schoolhouses  erected  at  that  time  and  for  years  he  frequently  visited  the 
schools,  speaking  words  of  encouragement  to  teachers  and  pupils,  arousing 
their  ambition  toward  greater  accomplishments  in  the  line  of  mental  acquire- 
ment and  reminding  the  children  especially  that  they  were  then  enjoying 
privileges  richer  than  their  parents  ever  enjoyed.  Scores  of  young  people 
listened  as  they  had  never  done  to  his  kind  and  earnest  persuasions  to  receive 
wisely  the  blessings  waiting  to  crown  their  lives. 

For  about  twenty  years  Elida  John  followed  the  occupation  of  a  surveyor 
and  conveyancer  in  Northumberland,  Columbia,  Montour  and  Schuylkill 
counties,  Pennsylvania,  carrying  compass,  chain  and  leveling  staff  through 
unbroken  forests  and  over  rocky  mountains  and  penetrating  into  some  of 
the  most  valuable  anthracite  coal  fields  in  the  state.  His  reputation  for  ac- 
curacy in  surveys  became  such  that  he  was  often  summoned  to  go  long  dis- 
tances to  survey  disputed  lines,  and  his  evidence  in  the  courts  of  justice  set- 
tled many  disputes.  He  was  often  called  upon  to  administer  estates,  such 
was  his  well  known  justice  and  honor.  In  this  work  it  was  frequently  in- 
cumbent upon  him  to  be  the  arbiter  between  man  and  man,  and  this  occa- 
sionally brought  him  into  competition  with  able  lawyers,  but  assisted  by  a  keen 
insight  and  an  unswerving  sense  of  justice,  he  was  on  many  occasions  enabled 
to  save  property  to  the  widow  and  orphan. 

He  early  recognized  the  fruits  of  intemperance  and  became  a  stalwart 
advocate  of  the  temperance  cause.  It  was  a  day  when  the  whiskey  jug  was 
found  almost  uniformly  in  the  harvest  fields,  but  he  refused  to  furnish  alco- 
holic beverages  to  his  workmen,  paying  them  a  higher  price  than  was  usu- 
ally demanded.  He  found  that  this  was  good  business  policy  as  well,  al- 
though it  was  the  moral  element  that  prompted  him  in  this  course,  but 
sober  harvest  hands  could  do  more  than  those  who  were  partially  intoxicated, 
and  in  the  long  run  his  harvesting  cost  no  more  than  if  he  had  furnished 
whiskey  and  paid  a  lower  rate  of  wages.  WThen  he  was  a  member  of  the 


826  HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY 

board  of  school  directors  he  was  the  only  one  who  strongly  favored  the  tem- 
perance movement,  and  in  fact  one  of  his  co-members  was  a  distiller.  When 
the  schoolhouse  was  being  erected  this  man  offered  a  resolution  that  no  tem- 
perance nor  abolition  meetings  should  be  held  in  the  schoolhouses,  which 
in  that  day  were  about  the  only  place  in  which  public  meetings  could  be  held. 
The  question  therefore  was  one  of  vital  concern  to  any  mind  interested  in  the 
public  welfare.  Mr.  John  recognized  the  fact  that  he  was  in  the  minority 
upon  the  temperance  question,  but  his  keen  sagacity  enabled  him  to  solve 
the  problem  by  amending  the  resolution,  so  as  to  exclude  singing  schools,  a 
pastime  which  nearly  all  of  the  school  board  greatly  enjoyed.  Not  wishing 
to  bar  out  the  singing  schools  the  resolution  was  defeated  when  put  to  vote, 
and  thus  the  schoolhouses  were  left  open  to  temperance,  abolition  and  other 
movements  for  the  moral  benefit  of  the  community.  At  one  of  the  district 
meetings  a  man  said  to  Elida  John:  "Mr.  John,  you  temperance  men  make 
a  great  fuss  about  a  drink  of  whiskey,  and  yet  if  a  distiller  should  offer  you 
a  cent  higher  than  the  market  for  your  grain  you  would  sell  it  to  him  to 
convert  into  whiskey."  Before  Mr.  John  could  answer  the  distiller,  who  be- 
longed to  the  board  spoke  up :  "No,  sir,  Mr.  John  will  not.  He  sold  his  corn 
to  Mr.  —  -  for  more  than  any  one  else  was  getting,  and  then  asked 

where  he  should  deliver  it.  He  was  requested  to  deliver  it  at  my  distillery. 
Immediately  he  recalled  the  bargain  at  his  own  loss,  and  refused  to  deliver 
the  corn  at  all."  All  through  his  life  of  seventy-eight  years,  during  which 
time  he  handled  much  corn,  he  never  sold  one  bushel  to  a  distillery. 

Mr.  John  was  a  most  earnest,  conscientious  anti-slavery  man  and  labored 
untiringly  to  promote  the  interests  of  abolition  prior  to  the  war.  Throughout 
his  long  life  he  was  actuated  by  the  spirit  of  Christianity  and  each  Sunday 
was  found  at  his  place'  in  the  house  of  prayer.  He  enjoyed  the  fullest  re- 
spect and  confidence  of  his  fellowmen,  who  entertained  for  him  the  warmest 
friendship  and  the  highest  regard.  Although  he  was  fearless  in  his  con- 
victions, he  was  a  man  of  ready  sympathy  and  kindly  spirit,  and  was  always 
ready  to  speak  an  encouraging  word  or  do  a  good  deed  for  another.  He 
contributed  liberally  of  his  means  to  the  support  of  religion  as  a  member  of 
the  Society  of  Friends.  Although  he  was  an  old  man  when  he  came  to  this 
county,  his  business  ability  was  recognized  and  his  fine  penmanship  is  seen 
on  public  documents  in  the  records  of  Jordan,  as  well  as  upon  the  registers 
of  his  church. 

His  wife,  who  was  ever  his  faithful  companion  and  helpmate,  and  who 
was  closely  associated  with  him  in  all  the  various  interests  which  made  up 
his  life's  contacts  and  experiences,  was  born  in  1802  of  English  and  Welsh 
parentage,  and  was  the  youngest  child  of  Hugh  and  Mary  Hughes.  A  farm 
which  is  now  the  site  of  the  enterprising  borough  of  Kennet  Square,  Chester 
county,  Pennsylvania,  was  the  first  landed  possession  of  her  ancestors  in  the 
new  world.  Her  parents  settled  on  the  banks  of  Shamokin  creek  in  North- 
umberland county,  Pennsylvania,  about  1790,  and  her  father  was  appointed  to 
the  position  of  justice  of  the  peace  by  the  governor  of  the  state,  and  ably  and 
impartially  served  in  that  capacity  for  many  years.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  John 
were  reared  in  the  same  neighborhood,  and  were  friends  from  early  child- 


HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY  827 

hood.  Their*  was  the  closest  companionship — a  most  ideal  family  relation. 
Matters  for  position  were  always  discussed  by  both,  each  listening  to  the 
other  with  consideration,  or  speaking  words  of  encouragement  and  sympathy. 
Like  her  husband,  Mrs.  John  was  a  most  earnest  Christian,  loyal  to  the  teach- 
ings of  her  church  and  exemplifying  her  religious  faith  in  her  daily  conduct 
and  her  relations  with  all  with  whom  she  was  brought  in  contact.  She 
passed  away  July  15,  1892,  and  her  husband,  May  1,  1883.  at  the  age  of 
seventy-eight  years. 

In  the  family  of  this  worthy  and  honored  Christian  couple  there  were 
ten  children :  Palemon,  Edwin,  Martha  A.,  Abia  C.,  Hugh  L.,  Ruth  Anna, 
Chalkley.  Sarah  E.,  George  D.,  and  Lydia  E.  Of  this  family  Dr.  Abia  C. 
John  was  the  first  physician  to  locate  in  the  northeast  part  of  the  county,  and 
here  he  secured  a  large  practice. 

Miss  Martha  A.  John,  whose  name  introduces  this  record,  spent  her  girl- 
hood days  at  the  family  home  in  Pennsylvania.  In  1855  she  came  to  White- 
side  county  as  a  private  teacher  in  the  family  of  Joseph  M.  Wilson.  After  a 
year  she  returned  east  to  Delaware,  where  she  engaged  in  teaching  school  for 
aboiit  a  year,  when  she  again  came  to  Whiteside  county  and  resumed  her  old 
position  with  the  Wilson  family.  About  1859  her  parents  came  to  this  county 
and  Miss  John  gave  up  her  place  as  instructor  in  the  Wilson  family  and  lived 
with  them,  but  continued  her  educational  work,  remaining  a  teacher  in  the 
neighborhood  for  about  twenty  years,  a  part  of  this  time  making  her  home 
with  her  parents.  She  has  devoted  the  greater  part  of  her  life  to  the  training 
and  instruction  of  the  young,  and  has  exerted  a  widely  felt  and  beneficial  in- 
fluence in  educational  circles  as  well  as  in  her  social  relations.  Beloved  by 
all  who  know  her,  her  name  is  mentioned  in  deepest  respect  and  kindly  re- 
gard. She  has  certainly  done  her  life  work  well,  and  contributed  her  full 
share  toward  the  uplifting  of  mankind  and  making  better  the  lives  of  others. 
She  and  her  brother  Chalkley  reside  upon  the  old  family  homestead,  which  is 
a  farm  of  one  hundred  and  eleven  acres  in  Jordan  township,  from  which  they 
derive  a  good  income. 

Chalkley  John,  living  with  his  sister  in  Jordan  township,  has  been 
prominent,  active  and  enterprising  in  his  relations  with  public  interests.  He 
is  well  known  as  a  former  representative  of  editorial  interests,  has  made  a 
creditable  record  in  official  life  and  has  been  successful  in  carrying  on  gen- 
eral agricultural  pursuits.  He  was  born  October  10,  1839,  in  Shamokin  town- 
ship, Northumberland  county,  Pennsylvania,  and  spent  the  days  of  his  boy- 
hood and  youth  under  the  parental  roof,  his  parents  giving  him  excellent 
opportunities  for  the  acquirement  of  a  good  education.  Strong  in  body  and 
ambitious  in  mind,  he  has  made  good  use  of  his  opportunities  as  the  years 
have  gone  by.  Thinking  to  have  better  chances  in  the  west,  he  left  Penns- 
sylvania  and  made  his  way  to  Illinois.  On  reaching  Whiteside  county  he 
found  it  largely  an  unbroken  prairie  district,  in  which  the  seeds  bf  civiliza- 
tion and  progress  had  scarcely  been  planted.  He  cast  in  his  lot  with  the  early 
settlers  and  sought  employment  on  the  farm  of  one  hundred  and  sixty 
acres  which  his  father  had  previously  secured  in  Jordan  township.  He  took 
possession  of  his  father's  claim  and  began  the  work  of  improvement,  which 


828  HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY 

he  carried  on  diligently  and  persistently.  Subsequently  he  purchased  one 
hundred  and  sixty  acres  of  wild  prairie  land  on  section  24,  Jordan  township, 
in  partnership  with  his  brother,  Hugh  L.  The  latter  erected  necessary  build- 
ing?, and  the  brothers  proceeded  with  the  work  of  development  and  cultiva- 
tion. The  partnership  was  maintained  for  some  time,  but  eventually  Chalkley 
John  purchased  his  brother's  interest. 

On  the  24th  of  August,  1875,  occurred  the  marriage  of  Chalkley  John 
and  Miss  Anna  Nixon.  Unto  them  was  born  one  son,  Marius,  whose  birth  oc- 
curred February  15,  1877.  Save  for  a  brief  period  of  a  few  years,  Mr.  John 
has  always  resided  upon  the  old  family  homestead,  which  he  operated  for  his 
aged  mother.  The  place  gives  evidence  of  his  careful  supervision,  practical 
methods  and  unbending  energy.  He  and  his  sister  now  live  upon  the  farm 
and  his  attention  is  concentrated  upon  its  further  improvement. 

At  different  times,  however,  Mr.  John  has  been  connected  with  other 
interests.  In  the  '80s  he  was  editor  and  manager  of  the  Farm  Gazette,  pub- 
lished at  Sterling,  and  became  the  president  of  the  Sterling  Gazette  Com- 
pany. He  held  the  office  of  road  commissioner  for  four  years,  being  elected 
to  the  position  in  the  spring  of  1877,  and  on  the  expiration  of  his  term  of 
service  in  that  office,  he  was  chosen  supervisor,  in  which  position  he  con- 
tinued for  a  number  of  years.  He  was  a  director  in  the  Northwestern  Agri- 
cultural Society,  which  holds  its  institutes  in  Sterling,  and  he  is  a  member 
of  the  Society  of  Friends.  His  activities  have  touched  many  lines,  and  all 
have  profited  by  his  labors  and  wise  counsel.  The  family  name  has  been  an 
honored  one  in  this  county  for  more  than  a  half  century,  and  its  present 
representatives,  Martha  and  Chalkley  John,  are  numbered  among  the  hon- 
ored and  respected  people  of  this  section  of  the  state. 


PORTER  HARKNESS. 

There  have  been  some  interesting  and  eventful  chapters  in  the  life  of 
Porter  Harkness,  who  became  one  of  the  early  settlers  of  this  section  of  Illi- 
nois, and  also  made  the  trip  across  the  plains  to  Pike's  Peak  at  a  time  when 
there  were  no  railroads  and  when  civilization  had  penetrated  little  westward 
beyond  the  immediate  borders  of  the  Mississippi  river.  He  was  born  in 
Springfield  township,  Bradford  county,  Pennsylvania,  October  5,  1830,  and 
was  there  reared  upon  a  farm,  under  the  parental  roof.  His  parents  were 
Chester  and  Louisa  (Smith)  Harkness,  natives  of  Massachusetts  and  Con- 
necticut, respectively.  They  were  reared  in  New  England  and  with  their 
parents  went  to  Pennsylvania,  their  marriage  being  celebrated  in  Bradford 
county,  where  their  remaining  days  were  passed.  Their  son,  Porter,  was  the 
eldest  in  a  family  of  three  sons  and  three  daughters.  His  brothers,  Royal 
and  Oscar,  were  both  soldiers  of  the  Union  army  in  the  Civil  war,  Royal  en- 
listing from  Dixon,  Illinois,  in  the  Thirty-fourth  Illinois  regiment  of  Volun- 
teers, while  Oscar  was  a  member  of  the  Pennsylvania  Cavalry. 


HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY  829 

In  early  life  Porter  Harkness  became  familiar  with  all  the  duties  and 
labors  that  fall  to  the  lot  of  the  agriculturist  as  he  worked  in  the  fields  and 
cultivated  the  crops.  He  continued  a  resident  of  the  east  until  twenty-five 
years  of  age,  when,  leaving  home,  he  made  his  way  westward  to  Illinois  in 
1856.  He  located  first  in  Ogle  county,  and  for  one  summer  cultivated  a 
rented  farm  there.  He  afterward  went  on  a  visit  to  Hancock  county,  and 
subsequently  crossed  the  plains  to  Pike's  Peak  with  ox  teams  and  six  com- 
panions. This  was  in  1859,  and  he  made  rt  second  trip  in  1860.  On  one  oc- 
casion he  saw  an  immense  herd  of  buffaloes,  the  animals  being  so  numerous 
that  they  could  be  seen  to  the  horizon  line  in  every  direction,  and  they  caughfc 
two  of  the  buffalo  calves  after  the  herd  had  passed. 

On  the  9th  of  August,  1862,  in  response  to  the  country's  call  for  aid,  he 
joined  the  boys  in  blue,  enlisting  from  LaSalle  county,  although  he  was  liv- 
ing in  Marshall  county  at  the  time.  He  became  a  member  of  Company  I, 
One  Hundred  and  Fourth  Illinois  Volunteer  Infantry,  under  Captain  Wadley. 
All  three  of  the  brothers  were  soldiers  of  the  Union  army,  and  the  military 
record  of  the  family  is  therefore  most  creditable.  Porter  Harkness  partici- 
pated in  the  battle  of  Chattanooga  and  in  all  of  the  engagements  of  the 
Sherman  campaign  to  Atlanta.  He  was  wounded  at  Chickamauga  in  Sep- 
tember, 1863,  while  serving  under  General  Thomas,  the  third  finger  of  his 
left  hand  being  shot  off,  and  for  about  six  months  he  was  confined  in  the 
hospital  with  his  injury.  .He  afterward  rejoined  the  army,  and  at  the  close 
of  the  war  participated  in  the  grand  review,  the  most  celebrated  military 
pageant  ever  seen  on  the  western  hemisphere,  when  thousands  of  Union  sol- 
diers who  had  participated  in  the  victories  of  the  north  passed  in  review  be- 
fore the  stand  on  which  stood  the  president  and  others  high  in  authority  in 
national  affairs. 

The  war  over,  Mr.  Harkness  returned  to  Marshall  county,  Illinois,  where 
he  purchased  a  farm  of  eighty  acres,  upon  which  he  lived  for  ten  years.  He 
then  sold  that  property  and  bought  a  farm  of  one  hundred  and  forty  acre^ 
in  Woodford  county.  There  he  lived  for  twenty  years,  when  he  disposed  of 
that  property,  and  in  the  fall  of  1894  invested  in  a  farm  of  two  hundred  and 
twenty-one  acres  on  section  7,  Lyndon  township.  To  this  he  added  until  he 
now  has  three  hundred  and  thirty-one  acres  of  valuable  fanning  land.  In 
the  spring  of  1895  he  removed  to  Chicago,  where  he  remained  for  five  years,  . 
leaving  his  farm  in  the  care  of  his  sons,  William  J.  and  Asa  J.,  both  of  whom 
reside  upon  the  property  and  are  operating  the  fields.  There  are  two  houses 
upon  the  home  place,  one  of  which  was  built  by  Mr.  Harkness  of  this  review. 
He  also  erected  other  buildings  which  afford  -ample  shelter  for  grain  and 
stock,  and  while  residing  upon  the  farm  he  was  largely  engaged  in  stock  rais- 
ing. He  also  conducted  a  dairy  business,  milking  thirty  cows  at  one  time. 
The  farm  is  devoted  to  general  agricultural  pursuits  and  everything  about  the 
place  is  in  keeping  with  the  spirit  of  modern  progressive  agriculture. 

In  May.  1868,  Mr.  Harkness  was  married  to  Miss  Johanna  Eichardson, 
who  was  born  in  England  and  died  May  20,  1884,  at  the  age  of  forty^six  years. 
She  had  come  to  Illinois  with  her  parents,  Thomas  and  Rachel  (Richardson) 
Richardson,  who  had  located  in  Marshall  county.  Unto  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Hark- 


830  HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY 

ness  were  born  four  children :  Chester  Thomas,  a  resident  of  Trego  county, 
Kansas;  William  James  and  Asa  Jay,  who  are  operating  their  father's  farm; 
and  Grace  Estella,  at  home.  The  second  son,  William  James,  was  married 
December  24,  1902,  to  Grace  L.  Slade,  a  native  of  Pennsylvania,  and  unto 
them  has  been  born  a  daughter,  Martha  Ernestine.  Mrs.  William  J.  Hark- 
ness  was  a  daughter  of  Ephriam  and  May  (Grace)  Lewis,  but  was  reared  by 
an  aunt  and  went  by  her  name.  For  his  second  wife  Porter  Harkness  chose 
Mrs.  Martha  E.  Slade,  whom  he  wedded  in  Chicago,  September  21,  1893. 
She  had  been  an  old  schoolmate  of  his  in  Pennsylvania,  and  she  died  in  Chi- 
cago, January  9.  1900. 

In  politics  Mr.  Harkness  was  a  stalwart  republican  from  the  time  of  the 
organization  of  the  party,  and  previously  was  a  whig.  He  belongs  to  the 
Baptist  church  at  Sterling,  and  is  also  a  valued  member  of  the  Grand  Army 
of  the  Republic,  thus  maintaining  pleasant  relations  with  his  old  army  com- 
rades, with  whom  he  did  valued  service  in  defense  of  the  stars  and  stripes. 
He  has  now  passed  the  seventy-seventh  milestone  on  life's  journey  and  is 
practically  living  retired,  while  his  sons  operate  the  farm.  He,  however,  re- 
sides on  the  old  homestead  on  section  7,  Lyndon  township,  and  was  formerly 
numbered  among  the  active  and  leading  agriculturists  of  the  community. 
Since  starting  out  in  life  on  his  own  account  in  early  manhood  he  had  de- 
pended entirely  upon  his  own  resources  for  his  success,  and  whatever  pros- 
perity he  has  enjoyed  is  attributable  to  his  earnest  and  persistent  labors. 


GEORGE  E.  PADDOCK. 

The  name  and  labors  of  George  E.  Paddock  are  inseparably  interwoven 
with  the  history  of  Prophetstown,  especially  in  connection  with  its  financial 
history.  He  is  today  well  known  in  banking  circles  in  Whiteside  county 
and  this  part  of  the  state  as  proprietor  of  the  Bank  of  Prophetstown  and 
cashier  of  the  Farmers'  National  Bank.  Both  institutions  are  under  his 
active  management  and  their  success  is  attributable  to  his  thorough  under- 
standing of  the  business  and  capable  management  in  its  control. 

Mr.  Paddock,  numbered  among  the  native  sons  of  New  York,  was  born 
in  the  town  of  Turin,  Lewis  county,  March  28,  1849.  He  traces  his  ancestry 
back  to  Robert  Paddock,  who  was  of  English  birth  and  the  founder  of  the 
family  in  America,  settling  in  the  Plymouth  colony  in  1634.  Daniel  Pad- 
dock, the  great-great-grandfather  of  our  subject,  was  a  member  of  the  patriotic 
army  in  the  war  for  independence  and  was  a  native  of  New  York.  His  son, 
John  Paddock,  also  born  in  the  Empire  state,  became  the  father  of  Chauncey 
Paddock,  who  was  born  and  reared  in  Westernville,  Oneida  county.  New 
York.  After  arriving  at  years  of  maturity  Chauncey  Paddock  was  there 
married  to  Miss  Lucy  M.  Hotchkiss,  a  native  of  Mexico,  New  York,  in  which 
state  they  began  their  domestic  life,  there  residing  until  1851,  when  they 
became  residents  of  Whiteside  county,  Illinois.  The  family  home  was  estab- 
lished on  the  Rock  river  near  Prophetstown  and  the  father  secured  a  tract  of 


LIBRARY 

OF  THE 

UNIVERSITY  OF  ILLINOIS 


HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY  833 

land,  devoted  his  time  and  energies  to  general  agricultural  pursuits,  pros- 
perity attending  his  labors  as  the  years  passed  by.  He  was  for  forty-three 
years  numbered  among  the  worthy  and  valued  citizens  of  his  community 
and  on  the  16th  of  November,  1894,  was  called  from  this  life,  his  remains 
being  interred  in  the  Prophetstown  cemetery.  His  widow,  still  surviving 
him,  lives  in  Prophetstown,  at  the  age  of  eighty-eight  years. 

George  E.  Paddock  was  but  two  years  old  when  brought  by  his  parents 
to  Whiteside  county.  His  boyhood  and  youth  were  spent  on  the  home  farm 
with  his  parents  and  he  mastered  the  elementary  branches  of  learning  as  a 
public-school  student  in  Prophetstown.  Later  he  attended  the  Northern 
Illinois  College  at  Fulton  and  in  1870  went  to  California  with  the  family, 
spending  one  season  on  the  Pacific  slope.  Following  his  return  to  Whiteside 
county,  Mr.  Paddock  engaged  in  farming  until  1880,  since  which  time  he 
has  figured  prominently  in  banking  circles  in  Prophetstown.  In  that  year 
he  was  appointed  cashier  of  the  Mattson  Bank  and  so  continued  until  the 
death  of  Mr.  Mattson,  when  he  succeeded  to  the  business.  It  has  been  con- 
ducted as  a  private  bank  since  1886,  under  the  name  of  the  Bank  of  Prophets- 
town,  and  under  the  guidance  of  Mr.  Paddock  its  patronage  has  increased 
and  the  business  has  been  extended  in  its  scope.  In  1892  he  erected  a  good 
two-story  brick  building  on  a  corner  of  the  main  business  street  and  the  bank 
of  Prophetstown  was  there  installed  in  January,  1893.  Mr.  Paddock,  how- 
ever, further  extended  his  activities  through  the  establishment  of  the  Farm- 
ers' National  Bank,  of  Prophetstown,  in  1902.  In  this  enterprise  he  was 
associated  with  Nathan  Thompson,  who  is  president,  while  Mr.  Paddock  has 
from  the  beginning  been  cashier.  He  has  the  active  management  of  both 
banks.  In  1902  he  erected  a  business  block,  to  which  he  removed  the  Bank 
of  Prophetstown  in  1902,  while  the  Farmers'  National  Bank  continued  busi- 
ness at  the  old  stand. 

Pleasantly  situated  in  his  home  life,  Mr.  Paddock  was  married  May  6, 
1878,  in  Prophetstown,  to  Miss  Ella  M.  Quigley,  a  native  of  Lancaster  county, 
Pennsylvania,  who  in  early  life  came  with  her  family  to  this  county  and 
completed  her  education  in  the  schools  of  Prophetstown.  Her  father,  George 
B.  Quigley,  became  one  of  the  substantial  farmers  of  this  county  and  later 
removed  to  the  vicinity  of  Evansville,  Indiana.  He  died,  however,  in  Sep- 
tember, 1907,  in  his  eighty-fifth  year.  Unto  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Paddock  have 
been  born  four  children:  Hugh,  who  is  cashier  in  the  Bank  of  Prophets- 
town;  Jessie  L.,  the  wife  of  Oliver  P.  Petty,  now  assistant  cashier  of  the 
Farmers'  National  Bank ;  Louis  M.,  who  died  of  typhoid  fever  at  Hot  Springs, 
Arkansas,  in  September,  1902,  at  the  age  of  twenty  years;  and  Gladys,  who 
is  now  a  senior  in  the  Northwestern  University  at  Evanston,  Illinois. 

Mr.  Paddock  has  not  only  figured  prominently  in  business  circles,  but 
has  also  been  an  active  factor  in  the  various  concerns  which  have  affected 
the  welfare  and  promoted  the  interests  of  his  village.  He  is  now  school 
treasurer  of  Prophetstown,  which  position  he  has  filled  for  thirty  years,  and 
the  cause  of  public  education  finds  in  him  a  stalwart  champion  whose  labors 
are  effective  and  far-reaching.  He  is  now  president  of  the  village  and  at 
other  times  has  filled  the  same  office  while  again  he  has  been  a  member  of 


834  HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY 

the  village  board.  His  public  service  is  characterized  by  unfaltering  devo- 
tion to  the  general  good  and  by  practical  methods  which  are  productive  of 
gratifying  results.  He  belongs  to  the  Masonic  fraternity,  in  which  he  has 
attained  the  Royal  Arch  degree,  and  also  has  membership  relations  with  the 
Illinois  Society  of  the  Sons  of  the  American  Revolution,  and  his  wife  is  a 
devoted  member  of  the  Methodist  Episcopal  church.  They  are  prominent 
socially,  having  a  circle  of  friends  that  is  co-extensive  with  their  acquaint- 
ance. The  life  record  of  Mr.  Paddock  has  been  marked  by  orderly  progres- 
sion and  in  it  there  is  not  one  esoteric  phase.  He  is  a  man  of  strong  indi- 
viduality, of  indomitable  perseverance  and  indefatigable  enterprise  and  has 
carved  his  name  deeply  on  the  record  of  the.  political  and  financial  history  of 
Whiteside  county,  while  the  village  of  "his  residence  owes  much  of  its  ad- 
vancement to  his  efforts. 


RICHARD  B.  BURROUGHS. 

Richard  B.  Burroughs  dates  his  residence  in  Whiteside  county  from  1864, 
and  in  the  years  which  have  since  come  and  gone  he  has  witnessed  many 
changes  and  at  the  same  time  has  borne  his  part  in  the  work  of  progress 
and  improvement,  especially  in  agricultural  lines.  He  now  lives  on  section 
33,  Prophetstown  township,  where  he  owns  a  farm  of  eighty-five  acres.  He 
was  born  in  Cattaraugus  county,  New  York,  January  10,  1838,  his  parents 
being  Selali  and  Louisa  Burroughs.  The  former  was  a  native  of  the  state 
of  New  York,  where  he  resided  until  after  the  death  of  his  wife,  when  he 
removed  to  Erie  county,  Pennsylvania,  where  he  remained  for  three  years. 
In  1864  he  arrived  in  Whiteside  county,  Illinois,  and  purchased  land  in 
Prophetstown  township,  but  was  not  long  permitted  to  enjoy  his  new  home, 
for  his  death  occurred  the  following  year.  He  was  twice  married,  and  by  the 
first  union  there  were  four  children,  but  Richard  B.  is  the  only  one  now  liv- 
ing. By  his  second  marriage  he  had  four  children:  Carlos,  a  resident  of 
Morrison.  Illinois;  Leonard  H.,  living  in  Prophetstown;  and  two  who  have 
passed  away. 

Richard  B.  Burroughs  remained  in  the  east  during  the  period  of  his  mi- 
nority and  acquired  a  public  school  education.  He  came  to  the  middle  west, 
however,  with  his  father,  in  1864,  and  has  since  been  a  resident  of  White- 
side  county.  He  purchased  the  farm  of  eighty-five  acres  upon  which  he  now 
resides,  and  his  time  and  energies,  year  after  year,  have  been  devoted  to  its 
further  development  and  cultivation,  his  fields  bringing  forth  good  crops, 
while  in  all  his  business  interests  he  has  been  actuated  by  laudable  ambition, 
while  his  labors  have  been  guided  by  sound  judgment. 

Mr.  Burroughs  perfected  his  arrangements  for  having  a  home  of  his 
own  by  his  marriage  in  1872  to  Miss  Martha  Griswold,  who  was  born  in  the 
state  of  New  York  and  was  one  of  nine  children.  After  a  happy  married 
life  of  twenty  years  she  passed  away  in  1892,  leaving  a  husband  and  two 
children  to  mourn  her  loss.  The  daughter,  Liicy  'May,  however,  is  now  de- 
ceased, while  the  son,  Merton,  is  at  home. 


HISTOEY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY  835 

Mr.  Burroughs  exercises  his  right  of  franchise  in  support  of  the  men  and 
measures  of  the  republican  party,  for  he  feels  that  its  platform  contains  the 
best  elements  of  good  government.  He  has  held  several  township  offices,  to 
which  he  has  been  called  by  the  vote  of  his  fellow  townsmen,  who  recognize 
•him  as  a  citizen  of  genuine  worth.  For  a  half  century  he  has  been  a  devoted 
member  of  the  Methodist  Episcopal  church,  and  his  life  is  at  all  times  hon- 
orable and  upright. 


DANA  B.  SEGER,  M.  D. 

Dr.  Dana  B.  Seger,  who  has  attained  a  gratifying  measure  of  success 
in  the  practice  of  medicine  in  Morrison,  was  born  in  Rumford,  Maine,  Janu- 
ary 4,  1842.  His  father,  Allen  Seger,  a  native  of  Maine,  was  a  son  of  Na- 
thaniel Seger,  who  served  in  a  Massachusetts  regiment  in  the  Revolutionary 
war.  The  great-grandfather  of  Dr.  Seger  lived  in  Boston,  but  nothing  is 
definitely  known  concerning  the  establishment  of  the  family  in  the  new 
world.  Allen  Seger  was  a  farmer  by  occupation,  and  in  1852  came  to  the 
middle  wast,  settling  in  Weatherstield  township,  Henry  county,  where  he 
continued  farming  until  the  fall  of  1852,  when  he  removed  to  Erie,  White- 
side  county.  Here  he  owned  a  farm  of  one  hundred  and  sixty  acres,  and 
carried  on  general  agricultural  pursuits.  He  spent  his  remaining  days  here, 
dying,  in  1872,  at  the  age  of  seventy-eight  years.  He  was  a  member  of  the 
Christian  church,  and  his  life  was  ever  upright  and  honorable.  His  political 
allegiance  was  given  to  the  republican  party.  His  wife,  Achsa  Howard,  was 
born  in  Vermont,  and  was  of  English  ancestry.  Her  father  was  Samuel 
Howard,  a  son  of  a  Revolutionary  hero,  who  enlisted  from  Massachusetts  for 
service  in  the  Continental  army,  serving  as  captain  of  his  company.  The 
Howards — three  brothers- — came  to  this  country  in  1636  and  settled  at  Bos- 
ton. Samuel  Howard  was  a  farmer  and  a  carpenter  and  joiner.  His  daugh- 
ter, Mrs.  Seger,  was  also  a  member  of  the  Christian  church  and  a  lady  of  many 
excellent  traits  of  character.  In  the  family  were  three  children :  Mary  E. 
and  Milton  H.,  both  deceased;  and  Dana  B. 

Dr.  Seger  was  reared  to  farm  life  and  attended  the  district  and  private 
schools  in  the  acquirement  of  his  literary  education.  He  afterward  studied 
medicine  in  the  office  of  Dr.  Samuel  Taylor,  in  Erie  and  in  Morrison,  at 
which  time  Dr.  Taylor  was  in  partnership  with  Dr.  Z.  C.  Ferson.  Mr. 
Seger  next  entered  the  Rush  Medical  College,  in  1865,  and  was  graduated  in 
1868.  He  began  practice  at  Erie,  where  he  remained  for  fourteen  years, 
removing  to  Morrison  in  1882,  since  which  time  he  has  successfully  prosecuted 
his  profession  here,  becoming  the  family  physician  in  many  a  household,  a 
liberal  patronage  being  accorded  him.  As  he  has  prospered  in  his  undertak- 
ings he  has  made  judicious  investment  in  property,  and  is  now  the  owner  of 
lands  in  Iowa  and  Missouri. 

Dr.  Seger  was  married  in  1873  to  Miss  Catherine  Reynolds,  now  de- 
ceased, who  was  born  in  Fenton  township,  a  daughter  of  William  and  Ann 


836  HISTORY    OF'  WHITESIDE    COUNTY 

"Reynolds,  the  father  a  pioneer  carpenter  of  this  county.  Dr.  and  Mrs.  Seger 
had  three  children:  Inez  K.,  at  home;  Ivy  L.,  the  wife  of  Luther  E.  Ram- 
say, an  attorney-at-law  of  Morrison;  and  Ralph  R.,  a  student  in  the  Illinois 
University. 

Dr.  Seger  has  a  creditable  military  record,  for  in  his  early  manhood,  when 
he  was  but  nineteen  years  of  age,  he  enlisted  for  service  in  the  Civil  war, 
joining  the  army  at  Chicago  in  November,  1861,  as  a  member  of  Company 
I,  Forty-fifth  Illinois  Volunteer  Infantry.  In  May,  1862,  he  was  discharged 
on  account  of  disability,  but  re-enlisted  at  Dixon,  Illinois,  in  1864,  in  Com- 
pany K  of  the  Seventy-fourth  Illinois  Infantry,  with  which  he  served  until 
October  8,  1865.  He  was  then  mustered  out  at  New  Orleans.  On  the  date 
of  his  second  enlistment  he  was  detailed  as  hospital  steward  and  served  in  that 
capacity  in  the  field  until  discharged.  During  his  first  enlistment  he  par- 
ticipated in  the  battle  of  Fort  Donelson. 

He  is  now  a  member  of  Alpheus  Clark  Post,  G.  A.  R.,  and  he  also  be- 
longs to  the  Masonic  fraternity,  the  Knights  of  the  Maccabees  and  the  Mod- 
ern Woodmen  of  America.  His  political  allegiance  is  given  the  republican 
parly,  and  while  not  a  politician  in  the  sense  of  office  seeking,  he  has  held 
some  local  offices.  In  the  line  of  his  profession  he  is  connected  with  the 
County,  the  State  and  American  Medical  Associations,  and  through  the 
interchange  of  thought  and  experience  in  those  organizations,  as  well  as  by 
private  study  and  research,  he  keeps  in  touch  with  the  advance  made  by  the 
profession,  and  thus  continually  promotes  his  efficiency.  He  discharges  his 
duties  with  a  sense  of  conscientious  obligation  that  makes  him  one  of  the  able 
members  of  the  medical  fraternity  of  Whiteside  county. 


CARL  S.  COE. 

The  various  business  interests  which  contribute  to  the  sum  total  of  Ster- 
ling's commercial  activity  and  enterprise  find  a  worthy  representative  in  Carl 
S.  Coe,  a  dealer  in  cigars,  newspapers,  magazines  and  periodicals,  his  place 
of  business  being  at  No.  3  East  Third  street.  He  is  one  of  the  county's  na- 
tive sons,  his  birth  having  occurred  on  a  farm  north  of  Sterling,  July  14,  1878. 
His  parents  were  Marcus  Lafayette  and  Julia  A.  (Gait)  Coe,  of  whom  mention 
is  made  elsewhere  in  this  volume.  Upon  the  home  farm  in  Hopkins  town- 
ship he  was  reared,  no  event  of  special  importance  occurring  to  vary  the 
routine  of  farm  life  for  him  in  his  boyhood  and  youth.  He  mastered  the 
preliminary  branches  of  English  learning  as  a  pupil  in  the  district  schools, 
and  afterward  attended  the  public  schools  of  Sterling.  When  not  occupied 
with  his  text-books  his  time  and  attention  were  given  to  the  work  of  the 
farm,  and  he  was  thus  connected  with  agricultural  interests  until  twenty  yecirs 
of  age  when,  thinking  to  find  other  pursuits  more  congenial,  he  began  clerk- 
ing in  the  grocery  store  of  W.  H.  Over  &  Company,  with  whom  he  remained 
for  several  years.  He  then  joined  his  father  in  a  partnership  in  the  grocery 
business  under  the  firm  style  of  M.  L.  Coe  &  Son,  which  relation  was  main- 


HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY  837 

tained  up  to  the  time  of  the  father's  death.  Later  Carl  S.  Coe  was  employed 
as  a  salesman  in  the  Bee  Hive  for  three  years,  upon  the  expiration  of  which 
period  he  bought  his  present  cigar  and  news  depot,  and  has  since  conducted 
a  large,  constantly  growing  and  profitable  business. 

On  the  20th  of  May,  1904,  Mr.  Coe  was  married  to  Miss  Harriet  V.  How- 
land,  a  daughter  of  James  H..  and  Elizabeth  H.  Howland,  who  became  early 
settlers  of  Whiteside  county,  taking  up  their  abode  in  Coloma  township,  where 
Mr.  Howland  followed  farming.  He  and  his  wife  are  now  residents  of  Ster- 
ling, and  unto  them  were  born  two  daughters  and  two  sons,  namely :  Harry ; 
Bert;  Alice,  the  wife  of  W.  J.  Sowles;  and  Mrs.  Harriet  Coe.  Unto  our  sub- 
ject and  his  wife  has  been  born  a  son,  James  Marcus  Coe.  The  parents  are 
members  of  the  Presbyterian  church  and  the  family  residence  is  at  No.  412 
Avenue  C. 

In  his  political  allegiance  Mr.  Coe  is  a  republican,  but  while  giving 
hearty  and  loyal  support  to  the  party,  he  never  seeks  or  desires  public  office, 
preferring  to  concentrate"  his  energies  upon  his  business  affairs.  In  trade 
circles  he  has  been  watchful  of  his  opportunities,  has  utilized  the  advantages 
which  have  come  to  him  and  is  now  enjoying  creditable  success  derived  from 
the  conduct  of  a  constantly  increasing  business. 


JOHN  BOYD. 

John  Boyd  has  retired  from  active  business  life,  although  still  residing 
on  his  finely  improved  farm  just  south  of  Morrison.  In  a  history  of  those 
long  and  prominently  connected  with  the  county,  he  well  deserves  mention, 
for  he  has  been  a  resident  here  since  July,  1850,  being  one  of  the  few  remain- 
ing old  settlers.  He  came  directly  from  Scotland  after  a  brief  interval  of  a 
week  spent  in  Chicago,  where  he  awaited  his  opportunity  to  secure  a  ride  in 
a  lumber  wagon  to  Dixon.  The  stage  at  that  time  made  regular  trips  be- 
tween Dixon  and  Fulton,  and  he  reached  the  former  city  just  too  late  to  make 
the  stage  trip  and  so  hired  a  man  to  bring  him  to  Whiteside  county.  He  has 
since  made  six  trips  back  to  Scotland,  but  while  having  the  warmest  attach- 
ment for  the  land  of  his  birth,  he  is  equally  sincere  and  loyal  in  his  devo- 
tion to  the  land  of  his  adoption,  and  has  the  utmost  love  for  the  stars  and 
stripes. 

Mr.  Boyd  was  born  in  Ayrshire,  in  the  parish  of  Dairy,  twenty  miles 
south  of  Glasgow,  September  1,  1826,  and  was  there  reared  to  manhood,  a 
son  of  William  and  Mary  (Robinson)  Boyd.  The  reports  which  he  heard 
concerning  America  and  the  advantage  which  she  offered  to  her  people,  in- 
duced him  to  try  his  fortune  in  the  new  world.  He  arrived  with  a  capital 
of  about  ninety  dollars,  which  has  since  been  increased  many  hundredfold, 
for  in  his  undertakings  he  has  been  very  successful,  and  as  the  years  have 
passed  has  acquired  a  handsome  competence.  He  began  farming  on  his  own 
account  on  what  is  now  the  old  homestead,  in  Mount  Pleasant  township,  just 
east  of  his  present  home.  For  six  years  after  his  arrival  he  worked  for  others 


838  HISTORY    OF   WHITESIDE    COUNTY 

at  threshing  and  in  different  departments  of  farm  labor.  He  early  formed 
the  resolve  that  he  would  ever  be  straightforward  and  honest  in  his  business 
dealings,  and  this  course  he  has  resolutely  pursued,  with  the  result  that  his  is 
an  unsullied  name,  and  in  business  circles  his  word  is  recognized  as  being  as 
good  as  his  bond.  His  first  farm  comprised  one  hundred  and  thirty  acres 
of  land,  but  as  opportunity  offered,  he  added  to  his  possessions  from  time  to 
time,  until  he  owned  over  six  hundred  acres  of  land.  Although  he  has  since 
disposed  of  a  portion  of  this,  he  yet  retains  over  three  hundred  acres  of  valu- 
able farm  property.  As  the  years  have  passed  he  has  prospered,  conducting 
large  business  dealings,  yet  has  never  had  ^a  lawsuit.  He  would  prefer  to 
suffer  a  small  loss  rather  than  appear  in  the  courts,  but  his  own  justice  and 
fair  dealing  have  almost  invariably  secured  him  such  treatment  in  return. 

In  February,  1857,  in  the  land  of  hills  and  heather,  Mr.  Boyd  was  mar- 
ried to  Miss  Isabella  Archibald,  who  was  also  a  native  of  the  parish  of  Dairy, 
and  was  there  reared,  a  daughter  of  Daniel  and  Mary  (Easdale)  Archibald. 
For  a  half  century  they  traveled  life's  journey  happily  together  as  man  and 
wife,  and  they  were  then  separated  by  the  hand  of  death,  Mrs.  Boyd  passing 
away  on  the  8th  of  March,  1907,  at  the  age  of  eighty-two  years.  They  had 
met  together  many  hardships  and  difficulties,  had  worked  side  by  side  for  the 
attainment  of  success  and  for  the  interests  of  their  family,  and  as  the  years 
passed  their  mutual  love  and  confidence  increased.  Mrs.  Boyd  is  most 
lovingly  remembered  for  her  many  deeds  of  kindness  in  the  community,  the 
poor  and  needy  finding  in  her  a  friend,  while  those  in  sorrow  or  distress  re- 
ceived her  sure  and  warm  sympathy. 

Unto  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Boyd  were  born  three  children,  but  the  daughter, 
Mary,  died  at  the  age  of  seventeen  years.  The  elder  son,  James  Boyd,  is  now 
cashier  of  a  bank  in  Kearney,  Nebraska,  where  he  has  made  his  home  for  the 
past  twenty  years.  He  is  married  and  has  a  son  eleven  years  of  age,  and  also 
lost  one  son  in  infancy.  William,  now  residing  in  Morrison,  married  a 
daughter  of  M.  S.  Heaton.  He  spent  several  years  in  Kearney,  Nebraska,  but 
returned  to  Morrison,  and  is  now  connected  with  the  condensed  milk  factory 
there,  driving  over  the  country  in  the  interests  of  the  company. 

For  many  years  John  Boyd,  of  this  review,  led  a  most  active  life  and 
was  widely  known  as  an  enterprising  farmer,  who  kept  abreast  with  the 
times  in  all  lines  of  agricultural  improvement.  In  addition  to  the  tilling  of 
the  soil  he  followed  the  dairy  business  for  several  years,  and  also  bought  and 
shipped  cattle,  making  a  specialty  of  milk  cows.  He  devoted  the  last  twenty 
years  of  his  business  life  to  the  cattle  business.  He  is  now  living  retired, 
having  a  fine  farm,  upon  which  he  has  made  all  of  the  improvements.  About 
eighteen  or  twenty  years  ago  he  erected  his  present  commodious  and  beautiful 
residence,  and  here  he  is  now  spending  the  evening  of  his  life  in  the  enjoy- 
ment of  well  earned  rest.  He  has  reached  the  venerable  age  of  eighty-two 
years,  but  keeps  in  touch  with  the  interests  of  the  day  and  in  spirit  seems 
much  younger.  Politically  he  has  always  been  a  democrat,  but  never  an 
aspirant  for  office.  His  time  and  energies  have  been  concentrated  upon  his 
business  interests  with  gratifying  success,  and  his  life  may  well  serve  as  an 
example  to  others,  showing  what  may  be  accomplished  by  persistent,  hon- 


HISTORY   OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY  839 

f 

orable  effort.  No  word  has  ever  been  uttered  against  his  good  name,  and  on 
the  contrary  he  enjoys  to  the  fullest  degree  the  respect  and  confidence  of 
those  with  whom  he  has  been  associated.  He  has  always  stood  for  all  that  is 
just  and  right  in  man's  relations  with  his  fellowmen,  and  has  ever  endorsed 
movements  for  the  benefit  of  the  county  along  material,  intellectual,  social 
and  moral  lines. 


H.  C.  CONRADY. 

It  is  always  a  source  of  encouragement  to  others  to  learn  of  the.  history 
of  a  self-made  man  who  in  the  pursuit  of  an  honorable  purpose  and  untiring 
activity  in  business  affairs  wins  a  goodly  measure  of  success.  Such  has  been 
the  record  of  H.  C.  Conrady,  who  follows  farming  and  stock-raising  on  sec- 
tion 23,  Union  Grove  township.  Six  years  ago  he  purchased  this  farm  of  two 
hundred  acres,  which  is  now  finely  improved,  being  equipped  with  many  mod- 
ern accessories  and  conveniences,  while  the  well  kept  appearance  of  the  place 
indicates  his  careful  and  systematic  management.  He  is  one  of  the  county's 
native  sons,  having  been  born  in  April,  1865,  in  Clyde  township,  where  he 
resided  until  fourteen  years  ago. 

His  parents,  Henry  and  Christina  (Zugschwerdt)  Conrady,  are  both  now 
deceased,  the  former  having  died  in  1895,  when  more  than  eighty-six  years 
of  age,  while  the  latter  passed  away  in  1881,  at  the  age  of  fifty-four  years. 
Henry  Conrady  came  from  Germany  to  the  United  States  in  1840,  casting  in 
his  lot  with  the  pioneer  settlers  of  Whiteside  county  when  almost  the  entire 
countryside  presented  the  appearance  of  a  wild  and  undeveloped  tract  of  land, 
unacquainted  with  the  labors  of  the  white  race.  He  purchased  part  of  his 
land  at  a  dollar  and  a  quarter  per  acre  and  also  bought  other  tracts,  securing 
about  one  hundred  and  fifteen  acres,  which  he  devoted  to  general  farming. 
His  political  views  endorsed  the  democratic  party  and  his  religious  faith  was 
indicated  by  his  membership  in  the  Catholic  church. 

Unto  him  and  his  wife  were  born  nine  children :  James,  a  retired  farmer 
living  in  Kingsley,  Iowa;  William,  of  Carroll  county,  Illinois,  who  for  many 
years  followed  agricultural  pursuits  but  is  now  retired;  Henry  C.,  of  this 
review;  Frank,  a  resident  of  Kingsley,  Iowa;  Julia,  who  is  also  living  in  the 
same  place ;  Mrs.  Lizzie  Senniff,  whose  husband  is  a  farmer  of  Carroll  county, 
Illinois ;  Clara,  who  died  at  the  age  of  twenty  years ;  Mrs.  Dora  Taylor,  who 
died  at  Chadwick,  Carroll  county,  Illinois,  in  the  fall  of  1905 ;  and  Mrs.  Katie 
Aldritt,  whose  husband  operates  a  farm  in  Aberdeen,  South  Dakota. 

H.  C.  Conrady  spent  the  days  of  his  boyhood  and  youth  in  Clyde  town- 
ship and  when  twenty-one  years  of  age  started  out  in  life  on  his  own  account. 
As  he  had  no  capital  it  was  necessary  that  he  earn  the  money  to  enable  him 
to  become  a  landowner.  For  sixteen  years  he  cultivated  rented  land  but  all 
this  time  was  possessed  of  a  laudable  ambition  to  one  day  own  a  farm  and  by 
carefully  saving  his  earnings  he  was  at  length  enabled  to  purchase  his  present 
farm  in  the  fall  of  1901.  It  was  formerly  known  as  the  Thomas  Harrison 


840  HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY 

place  and  comprises  two  hundred  acres  of  productive  soil  that  responds  readily 
to  the  care  and  labor  which  he  bestows  upon  it.  The  plowing  and  planting 
of  early  spring  are  followed  by  bounteous  harvests  in  the  late  autumn  and  thus 
year  by  year  he  is  adding  to  his  competency. 

In  1892,  in  Iowa,  Mr.  Conrady  was  married  to  Miss  Ella  Jane  Huffman, 
who  was  born  in  Rockingham  county,  Virginia,  in  1866,  a  daughter  of  Joseph 
and  Susan  J.  (Light)  Huffman,  who  became  residents  of  Iowa  in  1868,  set- 
tling in  Jackson  county,  where  they  remained  a  number  of  years.  Both  are 
now  deceased,  the  father  having  died  in  1880,  at  the  age  of  forty-two  years, 
while  the  mother  passed  away  November  1,  1908,  at  the  age  of  sixty-eight 
years.  They  were  the  parents  of  ten  children :  Edwin,  who  is  living  in  Kings- 
ley,  Iowa;  Harvey,  who  resides  on  the  old  home  farm  in  Clinton  county; 
Joseph,  living  at  Monmouth,  Jackson  county,  Iowa;  John,  who  died  at  the 
age  of  twenty-one  years;  Mrs.  Lucina  Kauffman,  of  Jackson  county,  Iowa; 
Mrs.  Anne  Hicks,  whose  husband  is  a  farmer  of  Ames,  Iowa;  Mrs.  Conrady; 
Mrs.  Villa  Wade,  who  died  at  her  home  in  Nebraska  about  1894 ;  Mrs.  Emroy 
Leatherberry,  of  Cedar  Rapids,  Iowa;  and  Mrs.  Nellie  Durkee,  of  Carroll 
county,  Illinois. 

The  home  of  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Conrady  was  blessed  with  a  son  and  daugh- 
ter: Lester  H.,  who  was  born  in  Clyde  township  March  14,  1895;  and  Nellie 
G.,  born  September  25,  1900,  in  Carroll  county,  Illinois.  The  parents  are 
well  known  in  this  part  of  the  state,  where  they  have  many  friends.  Political- 
ly a  democrat,  Mr.  Conrady  has  been  called  to  serve  a?  tax  collector  and  "in 
other  local  offices  -of  Clyde  township  and  has  also  been  officially  connected 
with  the  schools  as  a  director.  Both  he  and  his  wife  hold  membership  with 
the  Mvstic  Workers  of  Morrison. 


HARLOW  SMITH. 

In  a  history  of  those  who  have  been  factors  in  Whiteside  county's  agri- 
cultural development  mention  should  be  made  of  Harlow  Smith,  who  for  a 
long  period  was  connected  with  farming  interests  here.  He  came  from  Can- 
ada to  Whiteside  county  in  1848  and  died  in  Hume  township  on  the  27th 
of  February,  1905.  His  birth  occurred  in  Preston,  Canada,  May  19,  1830. 
His  parents,  William  and  Ana  (Southerland)  Smith,  were  both  natives  of 
Vermont,  and  in  early  life  crossed  the  border  into  Canada  and  were  there 
identified  with  farming  interests  throughout  the  remainder  of  their  days. 
They  had  a  family  of  thirteen  children,  but  only  one  is  now  living — Mrs. 
Electa  Dolph,  who  resides  in  Preston,  Canada. 

Harlow  Smith  spent  the  first  eighteen  years  of  his  life  in  the  place  of 
his  nativity  and  acquired  a  public-school  education.  He  then  came  to  Illi- 
nois, believing  that  better  business  opportunities  were  to  be  enjoyed  in  the 
United  States  than  in  the  Dominion  and  that  while  competition  was  livelier 
success  was  more  quickly  secured.  He  located  in  Prophetstown,  where  he 
began  working  for  Warner  Brothers  in  driving  a  team,  hauling  wood  and 


LIBRARY 

OF  THE 

MKIVERSITY-OF  ILLINOIS 


HARLOW   SMITH. 


MRS.  HARLOW  SMITH. 


LIBRARY 
OF  THE 

•Miucn«?|TY  QF  IL'JKCIS 


HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY  845 

grain  to  Peoria,  Illinois,  and  to  Milwaukee,  Wisconsin.  He  would  then 
bring  back  a  load  of  merchandise  and  spent  about  three  weeks  on  the  trip. 
For  two  years  he  remained  in  the  employ  of  that  firm,  after  which  he  took 
up  the  arduous  task  of  breaking  prairie,  and  through  his  labors  the  sod  was 
turned  on  many  an  acre  and  the  first  furrows  made  in  the  development  of 
the  fields.  Desiring  to  own  a  farm  of  his  own,  he  carefully  saved  his  earn- 
ings and  his  first  investment  in  property  brought  to  him  eighty  acres  of  land 
in  Prophetstown  township.  With  characteristic  energy  he  began  its  develop- 
ment and  later  sold  that  tract  and  bought  eighty  acres  in  Tampico  town- 
ship. His  next  purchase  made  him  owner  of  one  hundred  and  sixty  acres, 
which  he  broke  and  developed.  About  this  time  wheat  went  to  two  dollars 
per  bushel  and  as  there  was  no  money  in  the  county  and  he  had  raised 
no  crop,  he  was  forced  to  give  up  all  of  his  land  but  eighty  acres,  which  he 
sold.  Many  of  the  early  settlers  experienced  very  hard  times  owing  to  the 
fact  that  there  was  little  market  for  their  crops  and,  while  prices  were  very 
high  011  many  commodities  which  they  were  forced  to  purchase,  there  was 
little  ready  money  in  the  west. 

In  1865  Mr.  Smith  purchased  two  hundred  acres  of  land  on  section  34, 
Hume  township,  which  his  son  William  now  owns.  As  the  years  passed  he 
speculated  quite  largely  in  land  and  was  very  successful,  at  one  time  own- 
ing over  one  thousand  acres.  He  also  owned  and  operated  a  threshing  ma- 
chine for  fifty  years  and  as  a  thresher  conducted  a  prosperous  business,  for 
comparatively  few  in  the  county  owned  threshing  machines  and  his  services 
were  in  constant  demand.  When  he  bought  the  farm  in  Hume  township 
there  was  a  small  house  upon  it  and  a  prairie  stable,  and  the  land  was  fenced. 
Otherwise  it  was  unimproved,  but  the  unfaltering  energy  and  diligence  of 
Mr.  Smith  wrought  a  transformation  in  his  home  place,  which  he  converted 
into  one  of  the  finest  farms  of  the  county.  He  was  a  large  stock-raiser, 
keeping  on  hand  one  hundred  and  fifty  head  of  cattle  and  sixty-five  head  of 
horses.  He  also  raised  hogs  to  the  value  of  from  one  to  two  thousand  dol- 
lars per  year. 

On  the  2d  of  December,  1855,  Mr.  Smith  was  married  in  Lyndon  to  Mis^ 
Louisa  Pope,  who  was  born  in  Lincolnshire,  England,  in  the  village  of 
Spaulding,  October  5,  1838.  Her  parents  were  Abraham  and  Sarah  (Cramp- 
ton)  Pope.  Her  father,  born  in  1808,  died  in  1892  and  her  mother,  born 
in  1807,  passed  away  in  1889.  They  came  to  America  in  1850,  crossing  the 
Atlantic  in  a  sailing  vessel,  which  was  seven  weeks  in  completing  the  voyage 
from  England  to  New  Orleans.  They  thence  came  up  the  Mississippi  river 
to  Albany  and  located  at  Lyndon,  Illinois.  The  father  was  a  cabinet-maker 
in  England  and  after  coming  to  the  United  States  worked  as  a  carpenter. 
He  also  bought  land  near  Lyndon,  but  after  six  years  sold  that  property  and 
removed  to  Tampico  township,  where  he  purchased  three  hundred  and  twenty 
acres  of  prairie  that  he  cultivated  and  improved  successfully,  carrying  on 
farm  work  there  until  1878,  when  he  retired  and  went  to  Vancouver  Island 
with  his  wife.  They  had  a  daughter  living  there  and  the  death  of  Mr.  Pope 
occurred  on  that  island.  Unto  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Pope  were  born  eight  children, 
of  whom  five 'are  yet  living:  Mr?.  Emma  Turgoose,  who  is  living  in  Van- 


846  HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY 

couver;  Mrs.  Sarah  Mummert,  of  Waukena,  Kansas;  Mr*.  Smith;  Thomas, 
who  resides  in  Manchester,  Iowa;  and  Aaron,  who  is  living  in  Tampico, 
Illinois. 

Unto  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Smith  were  born  six  children:  Carrie  L.,  the  wife 
of  Fred  Brown,  a  farmer  of  Hume  township;  Ida,  the  wife  of  R.  B.  Smith, 
of  Prophetetown,  by  whom  she  had  two  children,  Henry  A.  and  Harlow 
E.;  Sarah  E.,  the  wife  of  James  J.  Farrell,  of  Prophets-town  township;  Wil- 
liam N.,  at  home;  Minnie  E.,  the  widow  of  Dr.  T.  L.  Round  and  living 
upon  the  old  homestead;  and  Herbert  H.,  who  married  Miss  Dolly  Teacii, 
residing  at  Craig,  Canada. 

Of  this  family,  William  N.  Smith  was  born  September  14,  1884,  and 
has  always  remained  at  home.  He  now  owns  the  old  homestead  property  in 
Whiteside  county  of  two  hundred  acres  and  eight  hundred  acres  in  Canada. 
He  was  his  father's  able  assistant  and  has  made  a  success  of  life,  capably 
managing  his  business  affairs  so  that  they  bring  to  him  an  excellent  financial 
return.  He  owns  and  operates  a  threshing  machine  outfit  and  is  greatly 
interested  in  stock-raising,  having  upon  his  place  some  fine  bred  horses  that 
have  shown  considerable  speed.  The  management  of  his  father's  business 
interests  largely  developed  upon  him  as  soon  as  he  was  old  enough  to  take 
the  responsibility,  for  his  father  had  received  but  limited  educational  priv- 
ileges in  early  life  and  was  considerably  handicapped  thereby.  In  politics 
William  N.  Smith  has  always  been  deeply  interested  and  has  held  several 
offices  in  his  township,  serving  also  as  a  member  of  the  county  central  com- 
mittee of  the  republican  party.  At  local  elections,  however,  he  believes  in 
supporting  candidates  without  regard  to  party  affiliation. 

Harlow  Smith  was  a  stalwart  republican  in  his  political  views,  while  for 
some  years  he  served  as  school  director.  He  believed  in  employing  good 
teachers  and  maintaining  efficient  schools,  and  in  fact  he  advocated  progress 
along  various  lines  that  are  helpful  to  the  individual  and  the  community  at 
large.  As  the  years  passed  he  won  a  notable  success  through  his  judicious 
investments  and  capable  management  and  at  his  death  left  an  estate  valued 
at  seventy-five  thousand  dollars.  His  genuine  worth  had  gained  for  him  a 
host  of  warm  friends,  so  that  his  demise  was  deeply  regretted  throughout 
the  entire  community.  Mrs.  Smith  is  a  lady  of  innate  culture  and  refine- 
ment, devoted  to  her  family,  and  in  the  county  has  a  host  warm  friends. 


THOMAS  ALEXANDER  GALT. 

Honored  and  respected  by  all,  there  is  no  man  who  has  occupied  a  more 
enviable  position  in  the  business  life  of  Whiteside  county  than  Thomas  Alex- 
ander Gait,  and  it  is  therefore  imperative  that  mention  be  made  of  him  in 
this  volume.  As  a  business  man  and  citizen  he  has  contributed  in  substan- 
tial measure  to  the  welfare  and  upbuilding  of  city  and  county.  His  indus- 
trial and  commercial  interests  have  been  so  extensive  and  important  that  the 
business  development  of  this  section  of  the  state  has  been  greatly  enhanced 


HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY  847 

thereby,  while  at  the  same  time  his  enterprises  have  proven  a  source  of  grati- 
fying individual  profit.  The  methods  that  he  has  employed  in  his  business 
life  are  such  as  will  bear  the  closest  investigation  and  scrutiny. 

Mr.  Gait  was  born  in  Lancaster  county,  Pennsylvania,  January  13,  1828. 
The  ancestry  of  the  family  is  traced  back  to  Robert  Gait,  who  came  to  this 
country  from  the  north  of  Ireland  and  settled  in  Lancaster  county  in  1710, 
there  following  the  occupation  of  farming.  The  line  of  descent  comes  down 
through  James,  Thomas,  James  and  William  Gait  to  Thomas  Alexander  Gait 
of  this  review,  all  natives  of  Pennsylvania.  The  grandfather,  James  Gait, 
was  also  born  in  Lancaster  county,  arid  in  connection  with  farming  followed 
the  occupation  of  milling.  He  died  there  at  the  age  of  sixty-five  years,  while 
His  wife,  who  bore  the  maiden  name  of  Mary  Martin,  attained  a  very  ad- 
vanced age.  Their  family  numbered  five  sons  and  five  daughters,  including 
William  Gait,  also  a  native  of  Lancaster  county.  He  was  reared  to  agricul- 
tural pursuits,  and  always  gave  his  attention  to  the  tilling  of  the  soil  through- 
out his  business  career.  He  was  born  in  1794,  and  his  life  record  covered  a 
span  of  forty-eight  years.  He  wedded  Mary  Ann  Thomas,  a  native  of  Mont- 
gomery county,  Pennsylvania,  and  daughter  of  Zaddock  Thomas,  who  was 
born  in  the  same  county,  and  in  early  life  followed  merchandising,  while 
later  he  became  president  of  the  Montgomery  County  Bank,  and  for  many 
years  remained  at  the  head  of  that  financial  institution.  He  married  Ruth 
Thomas,  and  both  died  when  about  ninety-two  years  of  age.  In  their  family 
were  two  daughters  and  a  son :  Mary  Ann,  who  became  the  wife  of  William 
Gait;  Julia  Ann,  the  wife  of  James  Gait,  both  now  deceased;  and  Ezeriah 
Thomas,  who  spent  the  greater  part  of  his  life  in  Chester  county,  Pennsyl- 
vania. 

Unto  Mr.  and  Mrs.7 William  Gait  were  born  ten  children,  six  sons  and 
four  daughters;  Amanda,  the  widow  of  James  L.  Crawford,  of  Sterling; 
Julia,  the  deceased  wife  of  James  T.  Lowrey;  Thomas  A.,  of  this  review; 
Isabella,  who  became  the  wife  of  Alexander  McCloy,  of  Sterling,  but  is  now 
deceased ;  Ezeriah  Thomas,  a  resident  of  Chicago ;  Dr.  William  James,  who  is 
now  deceased;  John  M.,  who  in  early  life  was  a  prominent  business  man  of 
Sterling,  but  is  also  deceased ;  Zaddock  Thomas,  deceased ;  Ruth  A.,  the  widow 
of  Dr.  Pennington,  of  Sterling;  and  Francis  Randolph,  who  died  in  infancy. 
All  were  born  upon  the  old  home  farm  in  East  Earl  township,  Lancaster 
county,  Pennsylvania,  which  property  is  still  in  possession  of  the  Gait  family. 
The  mother,  long  surviving  her  husband,  passed  away  in  Sterling  in  1870, 
at  the  age  of  seventy  years.  Both  were  devoted  members  of  the  Presbyterian 
church  and  earnest  Christian  people. 

Thomas  A.  Gait  was  reared  in  Lancaster  county,  Pennsylvania,  remain- 
ing upon  the  old  home  farm  until  fifteen  years  of  age,  and  pursuing  his  edu- 
cation in  the  old  fashioned  roadside  school.  When  a  youth  of  fifteen  he 
began  earning  his  own  living  as  a  clerk  in  Concord,  Pennsylvania,  and  the 
succeeding  year  went  to  Strasburg,  Pennsylvania,  where  he  was  employed 
as  a  salesman  from  1845  to  1847,  inclusive.  In  1848  he  accepted  a  position 
in  a  wholesale  dry  goods  store  in  Philadelphia,  where  he  continued  for  a 
year,  returning  to  Stra.-burg  in  1849.  There  he  bought  out  the  business  of 


848  HISTORY   OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY 

his  old  employer  and  continued  as  a  merchant  of  that  place  for  six  years. 
He  arranged  to  purchase  the  store  on  credit,  and  the  confidence  reposed  in 
him  by  his  former  employer  is  indicated  by  the  fact  of  this  arrangement,  and 
also  by  the  fact  that  Mr.  Gait  was  not  then  twenty-one  years  of  age. 

The  year  1855  witnessed  the  arrival  of  Thomas  Alexander  Gait  in  Ster- 
ling, and  he  soon  became  an  active  factor  in  its  commercial  interests,  forming 
a  partnership  in  the  hardware  business  with  David  M.  Crawford,  with  whom 
he  was  associated  for  two  years  under  the  firm  style  of  Gait  &  Crawford.  He 
then  purchased  his  partner's  interest  and  admitted  his  brother,  John  M.  Gait, 
to  the  firm  under  the  style  of  Thomas  A.  Gait  &  Brother.  They  were  thus 
associated  for  seven  or  eight  years,  when  they  disposed  of  the  hardware  store 
and  Thomas  A.  Gait  turned  his  attention  to  the  manufacture  of  farm  machin- 
ery in  connection  with  George  S.  Tracey.  They  also  conducted  a  planing 
mill  and  sash  and  door  factory,  thus  extending  the  scope  of  their  activity  and 
contributing  to  the  industrial  enterprise  and  business  development  of  the 
county.  Their  property  increased  and  the  business  prospered  until  1867, 
when  the  plant  was  destroyed  by  fire,  but  with  undaunted  courage  they  rebuilt 
on  a  more  extensive  scale,  and  in  1870  incorporated  the  Keystone  Manufac- 
turing Company,  with  a  capital  stock  of  one  hundred  and  fifty  thousand  dol- 
lars. This  company  manufactured  a  general  line  of  farm  machinery,  which 
they  sold  in  all  parts  of  the  world.  In  1870,  also  in  association  with  Mr. 
Tracey,  Mr.  Gait  incorporated  the  Sterling  Manufacturing  Company  for  the 
manufacture  of  sash,  doors,  blinds,  etc.,  but  this  has  also  been  converted  into 
a  farm  machinery  plant.  Their  business  developed  into  one  of  the  largest 
manufacturing  concerns  of  the  country.  They  employed  several  hundred 
workmen,  and  thus  placed  large  amounts  of  money  in  circula- 
tion in  Sterling,  Rock  Falls  and  Whiteside  county.  They  encouraged  thrift 
and  industry  among  their  men  and  induced  many  of  them  to  build  homes 
in  Rock  Falls,  while  others  built  dwellings  in  Sterling.  The  plants  were 
removed  to  Rock  Falls,  and  the  business  was  continued  under  the  name  of 
the  Keystone  Manufacturing  Company  until  it  was  merged  into  the  National 
Harvester  Company.  /Mr.  Gait  was  a  moving  spirit  in  this  enterprise  which 
became  one  of  the  foremost  industrial  concerns  of  Illinois.  In  all  things 
he  displayed  an  aptitude  for  successful  management,  formed  his  plans  readily 
and  carried  them  forward  to  successful  completion.  For  more  than  forty 
years  he  was  connected  with  those  business  interests  which  proved  not  only  a 
valuable  element  in  his  individual  success,  but  contributed  so  largely  to  the 
city's  moral  development  and  prosperity.  He  was  also  the  promoter  of  the 
Eureka  Manufacturing  Company,  which  was  first  organized  for  the  manu- 
facture of  school  furniture,  and  was  one  of  the  largest  of  the  kind  in  the  west. 
Since  then  it  has  been  converted  into  a  carriage  manufacturing  company, 
which  has  grown  to  be  an  extensive  enterprise,  nearly  one-half  of  the  product 
of  the  factory  being  shipped  to  foreign  countries,  a  large  amount  of  this 
being  sent  to  Buenos  Ayres,  South  America.  They  also  made  extensive  ship- 
ments to  South  Africa  until  the  Boer  war,  sending  direct  to  Capetown  and 
Port  Elizabeth.  There  are  few  industrial  interests  of  Sterling  or  of  Rock 
Falls  which  have  not  been  promoted  or  received  the  assistance  of  Mr.  Gait, 


HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY  849 

who  is  still  interested  in  a  number  there.  He  also  erected  the  Gait  House 
in  1876,  and  it  has  since  been  the  leading  hotel  of  Sterling  and  this  part  of 
the  state.  In  connection  with  his  partner,  George  S.  Tracey,  he  built  the 
Academy  of  Music,  and  he  also  built  a  number  of  other  business  blocks  of  the 
city  and  private  residences.  He  erected  the  handsome  building  recently 
donated  to  the  city  for  a  hospital  and  now  known  as  the  Galt-Brookfield 
Hospital. 

Mr.  Gait  has  always  been  a  very  busy  man  and  still  has  large  property 
interests  in  Sterling.  He  owns  much  improved  and  unimproved  property  and 
from  his  realty  interests  derives  a  most  gratifying  annual  income.  He  de- 
serves all  the  praise  implied  in  the  term,  a  "self-made  man,"  for  he  started 
out  in  the  business  world  without  capital  and  without  special  training.  He 
early  came  to  a  realization  of  the  fact  that  enterprise  and  unwearied  industry 
constitute  a  safe  basis  upon  which  to  build  the  superstructure  of  success,  and 
thus  he  has  builded  up  the  business  interests  which  are  a  monument  to  his 
active,  useful  life.  His  first  year's  salary  when  he  began  for  himself  was 
but  fifty  dollars.  He  bought  but  one  suit  of  clothes  a  year  and  practiced 
economy  in  various  ways  until  his  well  directed  labor  and  careful  expendi- 
ture secured  for  him  capital  sufficient  to  enable  him  to  engage  in  business 
on  his  own  account. 

Mr.  Gait  was  married  in  October,  1850,  to  Miss  Sallie  Julila  Jones,  of 
New  Hartford,  Connecticut,  who  died  in  1853.  In  1856  he  wedded  Miss 
Catherine  Anthony,  of  Borodino^  New  York,  a  daughter  of  Isaac  and  Per- 
melia  (Phelps)  Anthony.^There  were  eight  children  of  that  marriage. 
Elliott  LeRoy,  the  eldest,  now  engaged  in  the  banking  business  in  Sterling, 
married  Annie  Carter,  of  Worcester,  Massachusetts,  and  they  had  five  chil- 
dren, of  whom  four  are  now  living:  Thomas  Arthur,  Margaret  Adelia, 
Helen  and  Donald  Alexander.  For  his  second  wife  Elliott  L.  Gait  wedded 
Mary  Harvey,  of  Sterling,  Illinois,  and  they  have  one  son,  Robert  Harvey. 
Helen  Jane  Gait,  the  second  member  of  the  father's  family,  is  the  widow  of 
Louis  Edwin  Brookfield,  and  they  had  three  children,  Emily  Catharine, 
Fannie  Harriet  and  Edwin  Gait  Brookfield.  Mary  Permelia  is  the  next  of 
the  family.  Emily  Catharine  is  the  wife  of  Orville  P.  Bassett,  editor  of  the 
Springfield  News,  and  they  have  one  daughter,  Emily  Catharine.  Ruth  Gait 
became  the  wife  of  Frank  W.  Murphy,  and  they  have  two  children,  Catharine 
Virginia  and  Edwin  Brookfield  Murphy.  Three  of  the  children  of  Thomas 
A.  and  Catherine  (Anthony)  Gait  died  in  early  childhood.  For  his  third 
wife  Mr.  Gait  chose  Mrs.  Mary  (Holmes)  Ross,  a  daughter  of  Samuel  and 
Catherine  Holmes.  ^^ 

Mr.  Gait  has  always  been  active  in  support  of  public  enterprises  and  has 
been  particularly  generous  in  his  contributions  to  the  churches.  While  he 
is  a  Presbyterian  in  religious  faith,  he  has  given  substantial  encouragement 
to  other  denominations  and  rejoices  in  what  is  accomplished  in  behalf  of  re- 
ligion. His  ancestors  and  the  later  generations  of  the  family  since  the  first 
Gait  came  to  America,  in  1710,  have  never  deviated  from  the  Presbyterian 
faith  with  the  exception  of  one,  who  became  affiliated  with  the  Episcopal 
church.  Politically  Mr.  Gait  was  originally  a  whig,  but  upon  the  organiza- 


850  HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY 

tion  of  the  new  republican  party  he  joined  its  ranks  and  has  since  followed 
its  banners.  While  in  no  sense  a  politician,  he  has  had  personal  acquaintance 
with  many  distinguished  party  leaders  and  public  men,  some  of  whom  have 
attained  national  reputation,  including  Lincoln,  Grant,  and  others.  He 
never  held  but  one  office,  and  that  the  mayor  of  Sterling,  in  which  capacity 
he  served  for  one  year,  being  the  first  temperance  mayor  of  the  city,  and 
filling  the  office  at  great  sacrifice  to  himself,  as  it  demanded  time  and  at- 
tention which  should  have  been  given  to  the  furtherance  of  his  business  in- 
terests. His  administration  was  of  a  most  practical,  business-like  and  pro- 
gressive character,  resulting  in  the  achievement  of  needed  reforms  and  in  the 
advancement  of  the  work  of  improvement  along  lines  which  have  been  of  ut- 
most benefit.  Mr.  Gait  has  today  passed  the  eightieth  milestone  on  life's 
journey.  By  the  consensus  of  public  opinion  he  is  placed  among  the  fore- 
most in  the  ranks  of  those  men  whose  labors  have  been  of  the  utmost  value 
to  the  city  and  county.  His  business  is  widely  acknowledged  as  a  factor  in 
the  commercial  and  industrial  development  of  the  locality.  His  example  is 
such  as  many  might  profitably  heed,  following  the  obvious  lessons  which  it 
contains,  for  the  course  which  he  marked  out  for  himself  and  which  he  has 
closely  followed  is  such  as  leads  to  splendid  character  development  as  well  as 
to  the  acquirement  of  material  prosperity. 


JOHN  PEPPER. 

John  Pepper  is  now  living  retired  in  Erie,  having  passed  the  eighty-fifth 
milestone  on  life's  journey.  He  was  born  in  Wentworth,  County  York,  Eng- 
land, a  son  of  John  and  Mary  (Pepper)  Pepper,  who  were  cousins  and  spent 
their  entire  lives  in  England.  John  Pepper  of  this  review  was  the  fifth  of 
that  name  who  resided  upon  the  rented  farm  in  England  on  which  his  birth 
occurred.  It  was  a  tract  of  land  of  one  hundred  and  ninety-five  acres  and  hi? 
father  employed  five  men  in  its  cultivation.  The  family  numbered  four 
sons  and  two  daughters  but  the  subject  of  this  review  is  the  only  one  who 
became  a  resident  of  America.  One  brother  and  one  sister,  however,  are 
still  living  in  England.  The  parents  continued  to  reside  in  that  country  until 
called  to  their  final  rest,  the  death  of  the  father  occurring  when  he  was  seven- 
ty-one years  of  age,  while  his  wife  died  at  the  age  of  eighty-two  years.  His 
mother  died  in  the  nineties.  She  had  never  been  ill  a  day  in  her  life  and 
did  her  housework  on  the  day  that  she  died.  She  had  reared  a  family  of 
eleven  children  and  throughout  her  entire  life  enjoyed  remarkable  health. 

John  Pepper  whose  name  introduces  this  review  remained  upon  the 
home  farm  until  fifteen  years  of  age,  when  he  was  apprenticed  to  learn  the 
carpenter's  trade,  which  he  followed  in  his  native  land  until  he  reached  the 
age  of  twenty-six  years,  when  he  determined  to  seek  a  home  and  fortune  in  the 
new  world.  Accordingly,  he  bade  adieu  to  friends  and  native  country  and  sailed 
for  the  United  States,  taking  up  his  abode  at  Adrian,  Michigan,  in  1850.  He 
there  worked  at  the  carpenter's  trade  and  helped  to  build  the  first  railroad 


HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY  851 

shops  at  that  place.  Adrian  was  at  that  time  a  town  of  about  thirty-five  hun- 
dred inhabitants.  Mr.  Pepper  worked  at  carpentering  for  two  or  three  years 
and  then  assisted  in  the  building  of  the  railroad  shops,  after  which  he  was 
employed  in  the  shops.  He  was  afterward  engaged  in  the  railroad  shops  at 
LaPorte,  Indiana,  for  several  years  and  subsequently  removed  to  Blooming- 
ton,  where  he  worked  for  several  years  in  the  shops  of  the  Chicago  &  Alton 
Railroad  Company.  His  next  removal  took  him  to  Jackson,  Tennessee,  where 
he  was  again  employed  in  the  railroad  shops,  his  efficiency  in  mechanical 
pursuits  enabling  him  to  readily  obtain  a  position  wherever  he  went.  He 
remained  in  the  south  until  October,  1861,  when  he  returned  to  the  north, 
making  his  way  to  Whiteside  county.  Here  he  located  on  a  farm  on  the 
river  bottoms,  four  rniles  west  of  the  village  of  Erie,  in  Erie  township,  having 
purchased  the  property  in  1857,  when  on  a  visit  to  this  district.  He  had 
invested  in  one  hundred  acres  of  land,  which  he  has  owned  continuously  since, 
or  for  a  period  of  more  than  a  half  century.  Later  he  extended  the  original 
boundaries  of  his  place  until  he  now  owns  one  hundred  and  eighty  acres  in  that 
farm  and  in  addition  has  seven  acres  of  timber  land.  He  did  not  remain  long 
upon  the  farm  after  his  arrival  from  Tennessee,  however,  but  went  to  Clin- 
ton, Iowa,  where  he  engaged  in  the  building  of  passenger  coaches  for  the 
railroad  company,  having  charge  of  the  coach  department.  He  worked  there 
for  eleven  years,  or  until  the  big  shops  were  built  at  Chicago.  In  the 
meantime  he  had  become  the  owner  of  a  nice  home  in  Clinton,  which  he 
erected,  but  at  the  time  of  the  transfer  of  the  railroad  interests  to  Chicago  he 
disposed  of  his  house  in  Clinton  and  took  up  his  abode  upon  his  farm  in 
Erie  township,  where  he  continued  to  reside  until  about  four  years  ago,  when 
he  put  aside  agricultural  pursuits  and  became  a  resident  of  the  village.  His 
life  has  been  a  very  busy,  useful  and  active  one  and  his  untiring  industry 
in  industrial  and  agricultural  lines  has  brought  to  him  the  measure  of  success 
which  he  is  now  enjoying. 

On  the  8th  of  November,  1859,  occurred  the  marriage  of  Mr.  Pepper 
and  Miss  Emily  Oakey,  a  native  of  Birmingham,  England,  born  July  14,  1841. 
She  came  to  the  United  States  in  1852,  with  her  parents,  Isaac  and  Anna 
(Hunt)  Pepper,  both  of  whom  were  natives  of  England.  On  crossing  the 
Atlantic  they  located  in  Laporte,  Indiana,  and  her  father  there  worked  in 
the  railroad  shops  at  the  time  that  Mr.  Pepper  was  thus  employed  at  that 
point.  They  afterward  removed  to  Whiteside  county  and  resided  upon  the 
farm  which  is  now  the  property  of  Mr.  Pepper.  It  was  upon  this  farm  that 
the  marriage  of  our  subject  and  his  wife  occurred  and  they  have  become  the 
parents  of  three  children:  Frances,  the  wife  of  Joshua  Stephenson,  of  Rock 
Island  county,  Illinois,  by  whom  she  has  three  children:  Wallace,  Harvey  and 
Clara  D. ;  Mrs.  Henry  Osburn,  of  Oklahoma,  who  has  one  daughter,  Mabel, 
who  "married  Benjamin  Fisher,  a  native  of  England,  and  is  now  living  in 
Oklahoma;  arid  Clara,  the  wife  of  James  Gray,  of  Monticello,  Illinois.  She  was 
previously  married  to  Edward  Andrews,  who  died,  leaving  a  daughter,  Dorcas. 

Since  becoming  a  naturalized  American  citizen  Mr.  Pepper  has  given  his 
support  to  the  democratic  party.  He  cast  his  first  vote  for  Franklin  Pierce, 
declaring  his  intention  of  becoming  a  citizen  of  the  United  States  in  1851, 


852  HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY 

just  in  time  to  secure  him  the  right  of  franchise  for  voting  at  the  election  in 
which  Pierce  was  chosen  for  the  president.  Mr.  Pepper  has  served  as  road 
oiFicer  and  has  been  officially  connected  with  the  schools.  He  has  ever  been 
a  wide  reader  and  has  thus  kept  in  touch  with  the  trend  of  progressive  thought. 
A  love  of  music  has  ever  been  one  of  his  salient  characteristics  and  at  the  age 
of  sixteen  years  he  became  a  member  of  a  band  in  England,  with  which  he 
played  until  he  came  to  the  United  States.  He  also  played  with  a  band  in 
Adrian,  Michigan,  in  Clinton,  Iowa,  and  in  Fulton,  Illinois.  His  love  of  music 
has  been  a  source  of  great  enjoyment  to  him  throughout  his  entire  life  and  he 
possesses  more  than  ordinary  talent  in  that  direction.  He  has  never  had 
occasion  to  regret  his  determination  to  seek  a  home  in  the  new  world,  for  he 
found  here  the  opportunities  he  sought  and  through  the  improvement  of  the 
advantages  which  opened  to  him  he  worked  his  way  steadily  upward,  making 
a  creditable  record  as  a  business  man,  both  in  the  honorable  methods  he  fol- 
lowed and  in  the  success  he  attained.  He  is  now  one  of  the  honored  and  ven- 
erable citizens  of  Erie,  having  reached  the  eighty-fifth  milestone  on  the  journey 
of  life,  while  the  record  he  has  made  may  well  serve  as  an  example  and  as 
a  source  of  inspiration  and  encouragement  to  others. 


ALBERT  T.  ABBOTT. 

The  name  of  Abbott  is  an  old  and  familiar  one  in  Whiteside  county, 
for  from  its  very  earliest  history  representatives  of  the  family  have  been 
closely  identified  with  its  agricultural  development  and  progress.  The  gen- 
tleman whose  name  introduces  this  record  was  for  many  years  identified  with 
that  field  of  activity,  but  his  labors  in  former  years  now  enable  him  to  live 
retired,  although  he  still  retains  his  residence  on  his  fine  farm  of  two  hundred 
and  seventy  acres,  situated  in  Garden  Plain  township,  this  place  constituting 
the  old  family  homestead. 

Albert  T.  Abbott  was  born  in  Chautauqua  county,  New  York,  July  20, 
1842,  a  son  of  Clark  and  Betsy  (Crouch)  Abbott,  natives  of  New -Hampshire 
and  New  York,  respectively.  The  family  was  founded  in  America  by  thir- 
teen brothers,  who  emigrated  to  this  country  from  Scotland  prior  to  the  time 
that  this  country  was  engaged  in  the  struggle  for  independence.  Landing  in 
New  York  city,  they  there  separated,  establishing  their  homes  in  various 
sections  of  the  New  England  states.  Most  of  the  brothers  engaged  in  farm- 
ing and  several  of  them  served  in  the  American  army  in  the  war  for  inde- 
pendence. However,  Moses  Abbott,  the  grandfather  of  our  subject,  was  a 
cripple  and  was  therefore  incapacitated  for  service.  His  family  numbered 
several  children,  but  there  is  record  of  but  five,  these  being:  Moses,  who 
served  in  the  Mexican  war;  Clark;  John;  Relief,  who  married  a  Mr.  Cook; 
and  Nora.  The  father  of  this  family  died  in  Vermont. 

Clark  Abbott,  the  father  of  our  subject,  was  born  and  reared  in  New 
Hampshire.  In  1843,  hoping  to  enjoy  better  advantages  in  the  west,  he 
made  his  way  to  Illinois,  settling  near  Aurora,  where  he  made  his  home 


A.  T.  ABBOTT 


LIBRARY 

OF  TH£ 
gp  !! 


HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY  855 

until  1852,  in  which  year  he  took  up  his  abode  in  Whiteside  county,  taking 
up  government  land  in  Ustick  township.  At  the  time  he  settled  in  this 
localitj'  there  were  but  three  other  settlers  in  the  township,  these  being  Oliver 
Baker,  Henry  I.  Burt  and  Aaron  Ives.  Here  a  long,  strenuous  task  pre- 
sented itself  to  him,  but  he  met  it  with  a  steady,  unwavering  resolution. 
Wild  game  was  still  plentiful  in  this  district  and  wolves  frequently  came  in 
the  dooryard.  The  houses,  too,  were  very  crude,  being  built  by  driving  posts 
into  the  ground  and  covering  them  with  slabs  or  clapboards  on  the  outside, 
while  in  the  winter  a  similar  wall  was  made  on  the  inside,  the  space  between 
the  boards  being  filled  with  dirt  in  order  that  the  inmates  might  be  better 
protected  from  the  cold.  The  roof  of  the  house  was  also  made  of  clapboards 
and  many  times  members  of  the  family  who  were  sleeping  in  the  attic  have 
wakened  in  the  morning  to  find  several  inches  of  snow  on  the  bed.  The 
father  soon  developed  his  farm  of  one  hundred  and  fifty  acres  and  each  year 
gathered  good  crops,  for  the  soil  was  made  rich  and  productive  through  the 
care  and  labor  he  bestowed  upon  it.  The  family  had  to  endure  many  hard- 
ships and  inconveniences  during  the  pioneer  epoch  of  this  section  of  the 
state,  the  nearest  milling  point  being  at  Jacobstown,  in  the  northern  portion 
of  the  county.  The  trip  was  made  with  ox  teams,  the  journey  requiring  a 
day,  and  often  upon  reaching  the  mill  one  would  have  to  wait  a  week  in 
order  to  get  his  feed  ground  into  bread  stuff,  this  being  the  only  milling 
place  for  a  great  area  of  country.  In  1861  the  loyalty  and  patriotism  of  Mr. 
Abbott  was  displayed  when  he  organized  a  company  for  service  in  the  Civil 
war,  this  being  known  as  Company  F,  of  the  Ninety-third  Illinois  Regiment. 
He  did  not  go  to  the  front,  however,  as  his  son  enlisted  and  his  services  were 
needed  on  the  home  farm  and  in  the  care  of  the  wife  and  children.  He  con- 
tinued to  cultivate  this  property  until  1868  and  during  this  time  took  an 
active  interest  in  public  office.  At  various  times  he  served  as  city  marshal, 
being  in  the  office  about  ten  years,  while  for  several  terms  he  served  as  deputy 
sheriff  and  as  constable.  His  death  occurred  in  1882,  and  thus  the  county 
lost  one  of  its  most  valued  and  honored  pioneer  citizens,  for  from  the  time 
of  his  settlement  here  he  had  been  known  as  a  most  industrious  and  useful 
man,  whose  probity  was  an  unquestioned  element  in  his  career,  and  many 
times  his  energy  was  at  the  service  of  his  community. 

Clark  Abbott  was  three  times  married.  He  was  first  married  in  the  east 
to  Miss  Betsy  Crouch,  a  native  of  New  York,  who  died  in  1845,  two  years 
after  coming  to  this  state.  The  children  of  that  marriage,  five  in  number,  all 
lived  to  maturity,  these  being:  Mariam,  the  deceased  wife  of  Abner  Ustick; 
Olive,  the  widow  of  John  Johnson ;  Llewellyn,  deceased ;  Leland,  who  served 
in  the  Civil  war  as  a  member  of  Company  F,  Ninety-third  Illinois  Infantry, 
and  is  now  deceased;  and  Albert  T.,  whose  name  introduces  this  record.  The 
second  wife  of  Mr.  Abbott  bore  the  name  of  Sarah  Moore  and  by  this  mar- 
riage there  was  one  daughter,  Helen,  who  died  of  diphtheria,  this  being  the 
first  case  of  that  disease  in  the  county  where  death  resulted.  Mr.  Abbott  was 
married  a  third  time  to  Mrs.  Mary  Wilson,  nee  Cocks,  by  whom  he  had  a  son 
and  daughter:  Clark,  and  Mary,  the  wife  of  Ollie  Penoyer,  a  resident  of 
Quincy,  Illinois. 


856  HISTOKY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY 

Albert  T.  Abbott  was  but  a  year  old  when  he  was  brought  from  the 
east  to  Illinois  and  was  a  lad  of  eleven  yeans  at  the  time  the  removal  was 
made  to  Whiteside  county,  so  that  he  is  thoroughly  familiar  with  all  the 
pioneer  conditions  that  here  existed  at  the  time  the  family  home  was  estab- 
lished in  Ustick  township.  He  shared  with  the  other  members  of  the  house- 
hold in  all  the  hardships  and  privations  incident  to  the  development  of  a 
farm  in  a  wild  and  unsettled  district  and  acquired  his  education  in  a  log 
schoolhouse  in  the  neighborhood,  the  methods  of  instruction  being  equally 
as  primitive  as  the  building  in  which  his  studies  were  pursued.  He  assisted' 
his  father  in  the  work  of  the  home  farm  until  1861,  when,  the  Civil  war 
having  been  inaugurated,  he  displayed  his  loyalty  by  offering  his  services  to 
the  government  and  at  the  age  of  nineteen  years  became  a  member  of  Com- 
pany F,  Ninety-third  Illinois  Volunteer  Regiment,  serving  in  the  Seventy- 
fifth  Corps.  He  participated  in  the  battles  of  Vicksburg,  Raymond  and 
Jackson,  Mississippi,  and  engaged  in.  many  other  skirmishes  and  battles  of 
lesser  importance.  After  the  surrender  of  Vicksburg,  his  regiment  was  at- 
tached to  the  Seventeenth  Corps  and  he  was  engaged  in  the  Atlanta  campaign 
and  was  with  Sherman  on  his  celebrated  march  to  the  sea.  From  Raleigh, 
North  Carolina,  the  regiment  marched  to  Washington,  D.  C.,  and  from  the 
latter  place  went  to  Louisville,  Kentucky,  thence  making  their  way'  to  Chi- 
cago, where  Mr.  Abbott  was  mustered  out  on  the  5th  of  July,  1865,  his  term 
of  service  covering  two  years,  eleven  months  and  some  days. 

It  was  on  the  following  day  that  Mr.  Abbott  returned  to  his  home  in 
Whiteside  county  and  resumed  his  labors  on  the  home  farm.  After  two 
years,  however,  he  established  a  home  of  his  own  by  his  marriage,  in  1867, 
to  Miss  Eliza  Wilson,  a  daughter  of  Mrs.  Mary  Wilson,  nee  Cocks,  who  be- 
came the  third  wife  of  Clark  Abbott,  the  father  of  our  subject.  The  young 
couple  took  up  their  abode  upon  a  farm  and  in  1873  Mr.  Abbott  purchased 
the  old  homestead  farm,  comprising  one  hundred  and  fifty  acres,  for  which 
he  paid  thirty-five  dollars  per  acre.  As  the  years  passed  and  he  prospered 
in  his  undertakings  he  added  to  his  original  holdings  until  his  place  now 
embraces  two  hundred  and  seventy  acres,  located  in  Garden  Plain  township. 
In  his  farm  labor  he  has  followed  the  most  progressive  and  modern  methods, 
so  that  his  land  is  among  the  richest  and  most  productive  of  Whiteside 
county,  today  being  worth  at  least  one  hundred  dollars  per  acre.  For  many 
years  he  was  actively  engaged  in  carrying  on  agricultural  pursuits,  but 
through  his  energy  and  careful  management  he  has  acquired  a  competence 
that  now  enables  him  to  spend  the  evening  of  his  days  in  honorable  retire- 
ment, although  he  still  maintains  his  residence  on  the  old  home  farm. 

The  home  of  Mr.  and  and  Mrs.  Abbott  was  blessed  with  two  sons  and  a 
daughter:  Louie,  a  resident  of  Garden  Plains  township;  Lee,  who  is  engaged 
in  merchandising  in  Garden  Plain ;  and  Inez,  the  wife  of  Harry  Bitler,  who 
is  engaged  in  farming  at  Albany.  The  wife  and  mother  passed  away  in- 
1882.  She  was  highly  respected  by  all  who  knew  her  and  her  many  friends 
and  neighbors  felt  the  deepest  loss  when  she  was  called  from  this  life. 

Mr.  Abbott's  political  views  endorse  the  principles  and  policy  of  the 
democratic  party  and  he  has  been  called  by  the  vote  of  his  fellow  townsmen' 


HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY  857 

to  fill  various  public  offices,  having  served  as  road  commissioner  for  twenty- 
nine  years,  while  for  nine  years  he  served  as  assessor  of  his  township,  his 
official  duties  having  been  discharged  with  the  same  promptness  and  fidelity 
that  he  displays  in  the  management  of  his  private  business  affairs.  Having 
lived  in  Whiteside  county  from  his  infancy,  Mr.  Abbott  is  familiar  with  all 
the  pioneer  conditions  of  this  section  of  the -state.  He  has  seen  the  country 
developed  into  one  of  the  foremost  districts  of  this  great  state  and  through 
struggle  and  adversity  has  made  his  way  to  the  front  until  today,  crowned 
with  a  comfortable  competence  he  stands  in  the  same  relation  to  his  fellow- 
men  as  he  did  in  his  early  years  when  struggling  for  a  livelihood,  recognizing 
and  appreciating  honest  purpose  and  genuine  worth  and  rating  the  indi- 
vidual by  his  merits  and  not  by  his  possessions.  Today  at  the  age  of  sixty- 
six  years  he  lives  a  contented  and  happy  life  and  enjoys  the  rest  which  he 
so  well  deserves. 


JOSEPH  C.  SNYDER. 

Joseph  C.  SnyderJ  whose  life  record  is  a  valuable  asset  in  contemporaneous 
history  in  Albany  and  Whiteside  county,  was  born  July  18,  1844,  in  the 
town  which  is  still  his  home.  His  parents,  Joseph  and  Nancy  (Clarke) 
Snyder,  were  both  natives  of  Ohio,  and  in  1844  came  from  Cincinnati,  making 
the  journey  westward  in  the  month  of  April  by  way  of  Cairo  and  St.  Louis. 
Joseph  Snyder  had  previously  visited  Whiteside  county  in  1836,  but  had 
returned  to  Ohio,  had  married  there  and  made  his  home  in  the  Buckeye  state 
for  eight  years.  Following  his  arrival  in  Illinois  in  1844,  he  first  purchased 
forty  acres  of  land  in  Garden  Plain  township.  He  afterward  entered  a  claim 
from  the  government,  and  also  purchased  more  land  and  became  one  of  the 
extensive  land  owners  of  the  county,  having  at  the  time  of  his  death  about 
nine  hundred  acres.  His  business  interests  were  carefully  and  honorably  con- 
ducted, and  his  success  therefore  gained  for  him  the  respect  and  admiration 
of  his  fellowmen.  When  he  journeyed  westward  to  Illinois  he  employed  a 
young  man  to  drive  a  team  from  Cincinnati,  and  thus  bring  a  portion  of  the 
household  goods.  After  reaching  Whiteside  county  the  young  man  traded 
one  of  his  horses  for  his  first  land.  In  those  early  days  Chicago  was  the 
market  for  the  people  of  this  district.  It  was  necessary  to  haul  all  wheat 
to  that  point,  and  upon  the  return  trip  Mr.  Snyder  would  bring  home  the 
necessaries  of  life  and  a  few  of  its  comforts.  He  continued  to  do  his  trading 
at  Chicago  until  about  1855,  when  the  Chicago  &  Northwestern  Railroad  was 
built  through.  The  pork  which  he  sold  in  the  city  was  all  dressed  at  home, 
and  the  first  market  for  that  product  was  at  Galena,  about  sixty-five  miles 
distant.  A  little  before  the  Northwestern  Railroad  was  built,  the  Rock 
Island  was  completed,  and  Geneseo  became  the  market  for  wheat,  Joseph  C. 
Snyder  and  his  father  hauling  wheat  to  that  point.  It  was  there  that  Mr. 
Snyder  of  this  review  first  saw  a  railroad  train.  In  his  farming  operation? 
the  father  was  very  successful  and  became  recognized  as  one  of  the  prominent 


858  HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY 

and  influential  residents  of  this  district.  He  died  in  the  month  of  March, 
1889,  leaving  a  widow  and  nine  children.  Mrs.  Snyder  survived  until  May, 
1891,  when  she,  too,  was  called  to  her  final  rest. 

The  sons  and  daughters  of  the  family  are  as  follows:  Joseph  C.,  of  this 
review;  John  H.,  who  is  living  in  Garden  Plain  township;  Mary,  the  wife  of 
Lafayette  Clarke,  of  Morrison,  Illinois;  Sanford,  of  Nebraska;  William,  whose 
home  is  in  the  state  of  Washington;  Annie,  the  wife  of  Henry  Harner,  of 
Beatrice,  Nebraska;  Alonzo  S.,  who  is  living  in  Lewiston,  Michigan;  Edward, 
who  is  located  in  Garden  Plain  township;  and  Hattie,  the  wife  of  J.  E.  Wads- 
worth,  of  Morrison,  Illinois. 

Joseph  C.  Snyder,  whose  name  introduces  this  record,  was  reared  to  man- 
hood on  his  father's  farm,  and  in  the  winter  seasons  attended  the  district 
schools.  As  he  was  the  eldest  child  of  the  family,  his  opportunities  for  ac- 
quiring an  education  were  somewhat  limited,  for  his  services  were  needed 
on  the  farm  and  it  was  only  when  the  farm  work  was  practically  over  for 
the  year  that  he  had  the  opportunity  of  attending  school.  He  was  eighteen 
years  of  age  when  he  joined  the  Union  army,  in  June,  1862,  becoming  a 
member  of  Company  F,  of  the  Ninety-third  Illinois  Volunteer  Infantry,  under 
Captain  A.  F.  Knight  and  Colonel  Holden  Putnam,  of  Freeport,  Illinois.  The 
regiment  was  attached  to  the  Seventeenth  Army  Corps,  with  which  Mr.  Sny- 
der served  for  two  years.  During  that  time  he  participated  in  the  battle  of 
Jackson,  Mississippi,  in  1863,  after  having  previously  taken  part  in  the 
battle  of  Raymond,  Mississippi.  He  was  also  in  the  engagement  at  Cham- 
pion Hills,  where  twenty-two  men  of  his  company  were  killed  or  wounded. 
He  was  also  in  a  severe  skirmish  on  Big  Black  River,  Mississippi,  between 
Jackson  and  Vicksburg,  and  on  the  19th  of  May  the  army  under  General 
Grant  closed  in  on  Vicksburg  and  Mr.  Snyder  participated  in  the  siege  of  the 
city  until  the  22d  of  May,  when  Grant  ordered  the  historical  charge  on  the 
breastworks  of  Vicksburg,  in  which  Mr.  Snyder  took  part.  From  this  time 
on  until  the  fall  of  the  city,  on  the  4th  of  July,  1863,  he  was  under  constant 
fire  from  the  Confederate  guns.  Like  most  of  the  men  engaged  in  the  siege, 
he  felt  the  greatest  satisfaction  and  pride  when  the  city  finally  surrendered, 
knowing  that  it  meant  a  signal  victory  for  the  Union  forces  and  showed  a 
very  weak  point  in  the  Confederate  strength.  Then,  too,  it  had  not  been  alto- 
gether pleasant  to  be  under  such  constant  fire  from  the  enemy's  guns. 

Following  the  capitulation  of  Vicksburg,  his  corps  was  ordered  north,  and 
for  a  time  was  at  Helena,  Arkansas,  and  at  Memphis,  Tennessee.  From  the 
latter  town  they  marched  to  Chattanooga,  and  on  the  20th  of  November 
reached  their  destination.  Shortly  afterward  Mr.  Snyder  participated  in  the 
battle  of  Mission  Ridge,  where,  on  the  25th  of  November,  1863,  he  was 
wounded  in  the  left  ankle.  This  necessitated  his  remaining  in  the  hospital 
and  on  crutches  for  six  months.  After  recovering  the  use  of  his  limb  he  re- 
joined his  company,  near  Atlanta,  Georgia,  under  General  Sherman,  his  regi- 
ment being  at  that  time  a  portion  of  the  Fifteenth  Army  Corps.  He  went 
with  Sherman  on  the  celebrated  march  to  the  sea,  and  afterward  participated 
in  a  few  skirmishes  prior  to  the  close  of  the  war,  when  the  surrender  of  Gen- 
orals  Lee  and  Johnston  virtually  put  an  end  to  hostilities.  He  was  with  his 


HISTORY    OF    WHTTESIDE    COUNTY  859 

command  at  Raleigh,  North  Carolina,  and  from  that  point  marched  on  to 
Washington,  1).  C..  where  he  participated  in  the  grand  review.  There  the 
•  regiment  was  placed  aboard  the  cars  and  sent  to  Louisville,  Kentucky,  where, 
on  the  23d  of  June,  1865,  they  were  mustered  out  of  service.  Frojn  that 
point  they  proceeded  to  Chicago,  and  on  the  7th  of  July  received  their  pay  and 
were  honorably  discharged.  Mr.  Snyder,  who  had  been  at  the  front  for  three 
years,  gladly  returned  to  the  old  home  in  Whiteside  county,  where  he  arrived 
on  the  8th  of  July,  which  was  the  second  home-coming  from  the  time  of  his 
enlistment.  When  he  was  wounded  and  unable  for  duty  he  had  been  granted 
a  thirty  days'  furlough,  which  he  spent  at  home. 

On  again  reaching  his  native  county,  Mr.  Snyder  turned  his  attention 
to  farming,  which  he  followed  continuously  until  1886.  when  he  removed 
to  Albany.  During  the  succeeding  two  years  he  engaged  in  fruit  farming 
within  the  city  limits,  and  in  May,  1889,  he  turned  his  attention  to  the  livery 
business,  becoming  the  third  liveryman  in  the  city.  For  seventeen  years 
he  successfully  conducted  his  barn  and  received  a  liberal  patronage.  He  car- 
ried on  the  business  until  September,  1906,  and  then  retired,  being  actively 
engaged  in  no  business  enterprise  at  the  present  time.  He  was  previously 
engaged  in  breeding  and  buying  and  selling  Shetland  ponies.  He  also  bred 
one  which,  on  reaching  its  full  growth,  only  weighed  two  hundred  and  sev- 
enty-five pounds,  and  he  has  owned  and  sold  some  of  the  finest  Shetlands 
ever  seen  in  this  part  of  the  country. 

On  the  9th  of  October,  1866,  Mr.  Snyder  was  married  to  Miss  Mary  E. 
Ewing,  who  was  born  in  Albany  and  was  a  daughter  of  William  and  Harriet 
(McMahon)  Ewing,  who  were  among  the  early  settlers  of  the  county,  the  birth 
of  Mrs.  Snyder  occurring  here  October  8,  1849.  In  early  days  here  Mr. 
Ewing  was  a  teacher,  being  closely  associated  with  the  pioneer  development 
of  the  schools  in  this  locality.  Prior  to  the  war  he  was  engaged  in  steam- 
boating  on  the  Mississippi  river,  being  owner  and  captain  of  a  boat.  Mrs. 
Snyder  well  remembers  the  great  tornado  which  caused  so  much  destruction 
in  the  town  and  to  the  river  craft.  Her  father  was  also  proprietor  of  one  of 
the  first  sawmills  of  the  county,  and  was  closely  associated  with  the  industrial 
and  business  development  as  well  as  the  intellectual  progress  of  his  com- 
munity. He  died  in  1891,  at  the  age  of  seventy-three  years,  his  birth  having 
occurred  in  Ohio  in  1818.  He  served  his  county  frequently  in  positions  of 
public  trust  and  confidence,  and  stood  at  all  times  for  progress  and  im- 
provement. His  wife  survived  him  for  about  seven  years  and  passed  away  in 
1898.  Unto  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Ewing  were  born  eight  children,  all  of  whom  are 
still  living:  Mrs.  Snyder;  Phoebe,  the  wife  of  Ison  Shaw,  of  Albany;  WTilliam, 
also  living  in  Albany ;  Fanny,  the  wife  of  James  Beach,  of  Albany ;  Christina, 
the  wife  of  a  Mr.  Robinson,  of  Chicago;  Alta,  the  wife  of  Charles  Tranger; 
Charles,  living  in  Albany;  and  Lula,  the  wife  of  Charles  Stephens,  of  Belle- 
ville, Wisconsin. 

Unto  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Snyder  were  born  four  children :  Fanny,  the  wife  of 
J.  W.  Langford,  of  Mondota,  Illinois:  Minnie,  the  wife  of  G.  A.  Lott,  of 
Pueblo,  Colorado;  Mabel,  the  wife  of  A.  A.  Slocum,  of  Ladd,  Illinois;  and 
Myrtle,  the  wife  of  W.  R.  Beardsworth,  of  Albany. 


860  HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY 

Mr.  Snyder  has  filled  several  township  offices,  serving  as  constable  of 
Albany  for  twenty  years,  also  as  a  member  of  the  village  board,  and  as  a 
member  of  the  board  of  health.  Politically  he  is  a  stanch  republican,  having 
cast  his  first  presidential  vote  for  General  Grant  in  1868.  He  belongs  to 
Albany  Ivodge,  No.  456,  I.  0.  O.  F.,  and  to  Keystone  Lodge,  No.  144,  K.  P. 
His  residence  in  this  county  covers  sixty-four  years.  As  one  travels  over  the 
Bounty  and  sees  the  many  evidences  of  progressive  development  in  business, 
intellectual,  social  and  moral  lines,  it  seems  hardly  possible  that  it  is  within 
the  memory  of  living  man  when  this  was  largely  a  wild  and  undeveloped 
region,  with  but  few  homes  over  its  surface,  while  Indians  were  frequently 
seen  and  wild  game  was  to  be  had  in  abundance.  Such  were  the  conditions, 
however,  that  existed  during  the  early  boyhood,  of  Mr.  Snyder,  who  is  living 
to  witness  the  remarkable  transformation  of  the  county  as  its  lands  have 
been  claimed  and  cultivated,  its  towns  founded  and  its  villages  transformed 
into  thriving  cities.  He  has  been  known  to  many  settlers  of  the  county,  and 
his  name  here  has  ever  been  a  synonym  for  honorable  dealing  in  business. 
His  friends  are  many  and  his  personal  worth  well  entitles  him  to  representa- 
tion in  this  volume,  as  does  the  fact  that  he  belongs  to  one  of  the  old  pioneer 
families. 


MARCUS  LAFAYETTE  COE. 

A  deep  feeling  of  sadness  spread  throughout  Sterling  when,  on  the  6th 
of  March,  1902,  it  was  announced  that  Marcus  Lafayette  Coe  had  passed  from 
this  life,  but  while  those  who  knew  him  remain,  his  memory  will  be  cher- 
ished, not  so  much  on  account  of  the  splendid  success  which  he  achieved  in 
business,  but  because  of  his  life  of  helpfulness,  of  good  cheer,  of  broad  sym- 
pathy and  his  deep  interest  in  and  labors  for  the  benefit  of  his  fellowmen. 

Mr.  Coe  was  a  native  son  of  Whiteside  county,  his  birth  having  occurred 
on  a  farm  in  Jordan  township,  September  21,  1848,  a  son  of  Decius  0.  and 
Eveline  N.  (Stevens)  Coe,  natives  of  New  York  and  Pennsylvania,  respec- 
tively. Both  the  paternal  great-grandfather  and  the  grandfather  bore  the 
name  of  Simeon  Coe.  The  latter  was  born  in  Litchfield,  Connecticut,  and 
with  his  parents  removed  to  New  York,  the  journey  being  made  with  a  "spike 
team" — a  yoke  of  oxen  and  a  horse  at  the  wheel.  He  was  reared  to  manhood 
in  the  Empire  state,  and  in  1835  made  his  way  to  Whiteside  county,  Illinois, 
where  he  entered  government  land  in  Jordan  township,  paying  for  the  same 
the  usual  price  of  a  dollar  and  a  quarter  per  acre.  He  died  here  at  the  age  of 
sixty-four  years,  being  survived  by  his  wife,  Mrs.  Mary  (Miles)  Coe,  who  died 
in  1857.  Of  their  family  of  thirteen  children  only  one  now  survives,  Helen 
Ann,  who  first  wedded  Moses  Snavely,  and  after  his  death  became  the  wife  of 
Thomas  Stevens,  who  is  also  deceased.  Mrs.  Stevens  has  reached  the  advanced 
age  of  eighty  years,  and  has  lost  her  eyesight.  She  makes  her  home  on 
Eighth  avenue,  in  Sterling. 

Decius  0.  Coe,  the  father  of  our  subject,  was  born  in  the  village  of  Rush, 
New  York,  and  in  1835  accompanied  his  parents  on  their  removal  to  White- 


HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY  861 

side  county,  where  he  was  reared  to  manhood.  He  was  married  here  to  Miss 
Eveline  N.  Stevens,  a  daughter  of  Jonathan  and  Ellen  (Bowman)  Stevens, 
the  former  a  native  of  Stonington,  Connecticut,  whence  he  brought  his  fam- 
ily to  Whiteside  county  in  the  year  1838,  and  settled  on  a  farm  in  Sterling 
township,  where  he  was  engaged  in  farming  throughout  the  remainder  of  his 
life.  Of  their  family  of 'three  sons  and  one  daughter,  all  are  now  deceased. 
The  father  parsed  away  at  the  age  of  seventy-seven  years.  The  mother  was 
called  to  her  final  rest  in  1888.  As  above  stated,  Decius  0.  Coe  was  reared 
and  married  in  Whiteside  county,  subseqiient  to  which  time  he  engaged  in 
farming  on  his  own  account,  and  eventually  became  the  owner  of  one  hun- 
dred and  sixty  acres  of  excellent  farming  property.  After  a  few  years,  how- 
ever, he  removed  to  Sterling,  where  he  lived  for  a  time,  and  then  again 
resumed  the  occupation  of  farming,  removing  to  a  place  one  mile  north  of 
the  city,  this  property  now  being  in  possession  of  Martin  Brothers.  Mr.  Coe 
was  a  public-spirited  man,  and  for  many  years  served  as  supervisor  of  Jor- 
dan township,  while  during  his  residence- in  Sterling  he  served  as  alderman. 
He  was  also  a  stockholder  in  the  First  National  Bank  of  Sterling.  Both 
he  and  his  wife  were  members  of  the  Presbyterian  church,  Mr.  Coe  serving  as 
an  elder.  His  wife  passed  away  at  the  age  of  sixty-one  years,  being  survived 
for  nine  years  by  Mr.  Coe,  who  died  November  17,  1897. 

Marcus  Lafayette  Coe,  the  immediate  subject  of  this  record,  was  reared 
on  his  father's  farm  in  Jordan  township,  Whiteside  county,  aiding  his  father 
in  the  work  of  the  farm  during  the  summer  seasons,  while  in  the  winter  months 
he  acquired  his  education  in  the  Science  Ridge  District  school,  this  learning 
being  supplemented  by  study  in  Mount  Morris  Seminary  and  in  Cornell 
(Iowa)  College.  Returning  home  after  completing  his  education,  he  then  re- 
sumed the  pursuits  of  farm  life,  which  continued  to  be  his  occupation  through- 
out the  remainder  of  his  life  with  the  exception  of  one  year  prior  to  his  demise, 
when  he  was  engaged  in  the  grocery  business  in  Sterling. 

It  \va<  on  the  26th  of  August,  1875,  that  Mr.  Coe  established  a  home  of  his 
own  by  his  marriage  to  Miss  Julia  A.  Gait,  daughter  of  James  A.  and  Mary 
(Gait)  Gait,  both  of  whom  were  natives  of  Pennsylvania,  the  former  born  in 
Montgomery  county  and  the  latter  in  Lancaster  county.  Only  two  of  their 
children  reached  mature  years:  Mrs.  Coe;  and  Frank  Gait,  a  real-estate  dealer 
of  Sterling.  The  Gait  family  is  of  Scotch  origin  and  settled  in  the  Key- 
stone state  about  the  year  1710.  The  paternal  grandparents  of  Mrs.  Coe  were 
James  and  Julianna  Maria  (Thomas)  Gait,  the  former  born  in  Lancaster 
county,  while  he  pa-sed  away  in  Montgomery  county,  that  state,  when  jf\ 
middle  life.  He  was  survived  by  his  wife, -who  died  in  1875,  when  she  had 
reached  the  age  of  seventy-two  years.  Their  son,  James  A.  Gait,  the  father 
of  Mrs.  Coe,  was  one  of  the  early  settlers  of  Sterling.  He  was  here  married  to 
Miss  Mary  Gait,  who  accompanied  her  father's  family  to  Whiteside  county  in 
1844.  Her  death  occurred  April  29,  1859,  and  Mr.  Gait  was  married  a  second 
time,  this  union  being  with  Mrs.  Mary  (McCartney)  Burton,  the  widow  of 
Albert  Burton  and  a  daughter  of  Judge  David  and  Mary  (McNair)  McCart- 
ney. By  this  union  Mr.  Gait  had  a  son  and  daughter:  Harry  McCartney 
Gait;  and  Edith  Thomas  Gait,  who  became  the  wife  of  Scott  Williams. 


862  HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY 

Following  their  marriage  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Marcus  Coe  began  their  domestic 
life  on  his  father's  old  homestead  farm,  where  they  made  their  home  for  six 
years,  subsequent  to  which  time  they  removed  to  a  farm  near  Emerson,  Illi- 
nois, where  they  lived  until  after  the  death  of  his  mother,  when  he  returned 
to  his  father's  homestead,  which  came  into  his  possession  upon  the  latter's 
death.  He  later  disposed  of  this  property  and  purchased  a  farm  in  Jordan 
township,  this  tract  comprising  three  hundred  acres,  known  as  the  Wolfer- 
sperger  farm,  which  he  owned  at  the  time  of  his  death.  A  year  prior  to  his 
demise  he  abandoned  farm  life  and  removed  to  the  city  of  Sterling,  wThere  he 
engaged  in  the  grocery  business,  in  which  he  was  quite  successful. 

The  marriage  of  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Coe  was  blessed  with  six  children,  five  sons 
and  one  daughter.  Frank  is  superintendent  of  the  grain  department  of  the 
Corn  Products  Company  of  New  York  and  Chicago.  Carl  S.  is  conducting  a 
cigar  store  and  news  stand  in  Sterling.  He  wedded  Harriet  V.  Howland,  by 
whom  he  has  one  son,  James  Marcus.  '  Evelyn  B.,  the  eldest  daughter,  is  the 
wife  of  George  D.  Greenough,  a  real-estate  dealer  of  Sterling.  James  Alex- 
ander died  in  January,  1905,  at  the  age  of  twenty-one  years.  Dee  0.  is  em- 
ployed by  his  brother  Carl,  while  Burton  W.,  the  youngest  member  of  the 
family,  is  at  home. 

Mr.  Coe  gave  his  political  support  to  the  republican  party,  while  his  re- 
ligious faith  was  indicated  by  his  membership  in  the  Presbyterian  church,  to 
which  his  widow  also  belongs.  He  was  well  and  favorably  known  in  both 
Sterling  and  Whitaside  county  as  an  industrious  and  useful  man,  whose  prob- 
ity was  an  unquestioned  fact  in  his  career  and  therefore  his  death,  which 
occurred  on  the  6th  of  March,  1902,  was  the  occasion  of  deep  regret  not  only 
to  his  immediate  family  but  also  to  his  numerous  friends  and  acquaintances. 


JOHN  F.  SHULER. 

Among  the  representatives  of  farming  interests  in  Montmorency  town- 
ship is  numbered  John  F.  Shuler.  He  was  born  in  this  township  on  the 
place  where  he  now  resides  and  is  a  son  of  John  and  Eliza  (Scheler)  Shuler, 
who  were  natives  of  Germany  and  Pennsylvania,  respectively.  The  father 
came  to  America  at  an  early  age  and,  removing  to  the  west,  settled  in  White- 
side  county,  Illinois,  where  he  purchased  eighty  acres  of  land,  while  later  he 
added  a  tract  of  similar  size  to  the  first  purchase.  He  became  a  prosperous 
farmer  and  afterward  bought'  the  old  Woodford  farm  of  one  hundred  and 
sixty  acres,  where  he  lived  for  about  a  year  and  a  half  or  until  his  death. 
His  good  qualities  won  him  the  respect  and  confidence  of  his  fellowmen, 
while  his  well-directed  activity  was  the  measure  of  a  gratifying  success. 

John  F.  Shuler  acquired  his  education  in  the  common  schools  and  Rock 
Falls  high  school,  where  he  pursued  the  course  to  within  a  few  months  of 
graduation,  when  the  duties  and  responsibilities  of  the  home  farm  made  it 
absolutely  necessary  that  he  put  aside  his  text-books  and  assist  his  mother 
in  carrying  on  the  home  place.  His  father  had  died  when  the  son  was  but 


MR.  AND  MRS.  JOHN  F.  SHULER 


LIBRARY 
OF  THE 

OF  ILLISCE 


HISTORY    OF    WHITESIUE   COUNTY  865 

seven  years  of  age  and  from  that  time  forward  he  assisted  more  and  more 
largely  as  his  years  and  strength  increased  in  the  work  of  his  mother's  farm. 
His  entire  life  has  been  one  of  unremitting  energy  and  carefully  directed 
diligence. 

On  the  23d  of  November,  1904,  Mr.  Shuler  was  married  to  Miss  Han- 
nah R.  Ramsdell,  a  daughter  of  Reuben  H.  and  Barbara  (Smith)  Ramsdell, 
of  whom  mention  is  made  elsewhere  in  this  volume.  At  the  time  of  their 
marriage  Mr.  Shuler  located  upon  the  old  homestead  where  he  has  since 
lived.  The  place  is  known  as  the  Pine  Row  farm  and  is  pleasantly  and  con- 
veniently located  about  three  miles  south  of  Sterling,  in  the  midst  of  the 
richest  farming  country  of  the  world.  The  soil'  responds  readily  to  the  care 
and  cultivation  bestowed  upon  it  and  the  intelligently  directed  labors  of  Mr. 
Shuler  have  resulted  in  bringing  forth  large  crops  and  in  placing  the  farm 
under  high  cultivation. 

Mrs.  Shuler  was  educated  in  the  Sterling  township  high  school  and  is 
a  graduate  of  the  class  of  1902.  She  also  attended  a  business  college  and 
was  employed  for  a  time  as  bookkeeper.  Both  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Shuler  have 
many  warm  friends  in  this  locality,  where  they  have  long  resided,  their  good 
qualities  of  heart  and  mind  winning  for  them  the  favorable  regard  of  those 
with  whom  they  have  been  associated.  They  are  members  of  the  Lutheran 
church  and  Mr.  Shuler  gives  his  political  allegiance  to  the  republican  party. 
That  his  life  has  been  a  straightforward  and  honorable  one  is  indicated  by 
the  fact  that  many  of  his  stanchest  friends  are  those  who  have  known  him 
from  his  boyhood  to  the  present  time. 


VICTOR  SCHIFFMACHER. 

Victor  Schiffmacher,  who  is  now  living  retired  at  No.  806  First  avenue  in 
Sterling,  has  long  made  his  home  in  this  section  of  the  state.  In  fact  more 
than  half  a  century  has  passed  since  he  arrived  in  Whiteside  county,  begin- 
ning life  here  as  a  farm  hand.  On  the  day  that  Abraham  Lincoln  was  elected 
to  the  presidency  he  took  up  his  abode  in  Sterling,  where  he  has  since  made 
his  home.  The  years  have  been  witness  of  the  honorable  record  that  he  has 
made  in  the  conduct  of  his  business  and  in  all  his  relations  with  his  fellow- 
men,  and  he  is  now  held  in  such  high  regard  as  to  render  it  imperative  that 
mention  be  made  of  him  in  this  volume. 

Mr.  Schiffmacher  -was  born  in  Scheibenhardt,  Kanton  Langen,  Kaudel, 
Rheinpfalz,  Germany,  April  10,  1831,  his  parents  being  Francis  Joseph  and 
Cathariria  (Roth)  Schiffmacher.  The  father  was  a  civil  engineer  in  his 
native  country  and  a  prominent  man  of  the  locality  in  which  he  resided.  He 
died  about  1867  or  1868  at  the  age  of  sixty-five  years,  while  his  wife  survived 
him  for  a  considerable  period  and  was  more  than  eighty-eight  years  of  age  at 
the  time  of  her  death.  They  were  the  parents  of  four  children  who  reached 
adult  age:  Victor;  Appalonia,  deceased;  Joseph  A.,  living  in  Sterling,  Illinois; 
and  Thersia,  deceased.  One  other  child  died  in  infancy. 


866  HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY 

Victor  Sch  iff macher,  who  was  reared  in  the  fatherland,  acquired  a  good 
common-school  education  and  when  fourteen  year*  of  age  started  out  in  life 
on  his  own  account  by  learning  the  cooper's  trade,  which  he  followed  in 
Germany  and  also  after  his  emigration  to  the  new  world.  Favorable  reports 
reached  him  concerning  the  opportunities  of  America  and  after  a  voyage  of 
forty-two  days  he  landed  in  New  York  city,  June  18,  1854,  determined  to  try 
his  fortune  on  this  side  of  the  Atlantic.  He  made  his  way  at  once  into  the 
interior  of  the  country  and  reached  Chicago  on  the  2d  of  July.  Continuing 
his  journey  westward  to  Whiteside  county,  he  secured  employment  as  a  farm 
hand  in  Jordan  township  about  six  miles  from  Sterling,  and  was  thus  em- 
ployed during  the  summer  months,  while  through  the  winter  he.  worked  at  his 
trade.  As  previously  stated  he  became  a  resident  of  Sterling  in  November, 
1860,  on  the  day  on  which  Abraham  Lincoln  was  elected  president.  Here 
he  worked  as  a  journeyman  at  the  cooper's  trade,  being  so  employed  until  the 
following  spring,  when  he  began  business  on  his  own  account,  so  continuing 
until  1884.  He  built  up  an  excellent  trade  as  a  cooper,  sometimes  employing 
as  many  as  forty  men.  On  his  retirement  from  that  business  he  began  con- 
tracting and  put  in  one  of  the  first  sewers  in  Sterling,  it  extending  from  the 
river  to  the  north  side  of  the  railroad  tracks.  He  also  put  in  the  water  wheels 
and  power  for  the  electric  light  plant  and  took  other  contracts  but  for  a  long 
period  has  lived  retired  in  the  enjoyment  of  well  earned  rest. 

On  the  31st  of  October,  1861,  Mr.  Schiffmacher  was  married  to  Miss  Mar- 
garetta  Boehm,  a  daughter  of  Frederick  and  Salome  Boehm.  She  died  January 
13,  1900,  at  the  age  of  sixty-four  years,  in  the  faith  of  the  Catholic  church,  her 
membership  having  been  with  the  Sacred  Heart  church.  On  the  24th  of  Sep- 
tember, 1900,  Mr.  Schiffmacher  was  married  again,  his  second  union  being 
with  Mary  Ann  Burkhard,  who  was  born  in  Dahn,  Kanton  Dahn,  Rheinpfalz, 
Germany,  November  29,  1848,  a  daughter  of  Philip  and  Margaretha  (Schrein- 
cr)  Burkhard,  who  died  between  eight  or  nine  years  after  she  came  to  America. 
Mrs.  Schiffmacher  landed  in  Rock  Island  on  New  Year's  day,  1868,  and  has 
since  lived  in  northern  Illinois. 

Mr.  Schiffmacher  and  his  present  wife  are  members  of  the  Sacred  Heart 
Catholic  church.  He  cast  his  first  presidential  vote  for  Abraham  Lincoln  in 
1860,  also  voted  for  General  Grant  and  has  many  times  supported  the  candi- 
dates of  the  republican  party  but  may  be  said  to  be  independent  in  politics, 
holding  himself  free  to  cast  his  ballot  without  regard  to  party  affiliation  or  to 
party  rule.  He  resides  at  No.  806  First  avenue.  Sterling,  where  in  1906  he 
erected  a  fine  residence,  and  in  the  same  year  built  an  attractive  home  at  No. 
802  First  avenue  for  his  nephew,  John  Lauber. 

Mr.  Schiffmacher  has  never  had  occasion  to  regret  his  determination  to 
come  to  America  for  here  he  has  found  the  business  opportunities  he  sought 
and  as  the  years  went  by  worked  his  way  steadily  upward  from  a  humble  finan- 
cial position  to  one  of  affluence.  His  labors  were  carefully  directed  and  his 
keen  insight  and  executive  force  were  strong  elements  in  his  success.  He 
now  has  good  invested  interests  from  which  he  annually  derives  a  desirable 
income.  He  is  a  director  of  the  First  National  Bank  of  Sterling,  being  so  con- 
nected with  the  institution  for  twenty-seven  years  and  with  the  exception  of 


HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY  867 

the  president  is  the  oldest  director  of  this  bank  in  years  of  continuous  con- 
nection with  its  board  of  managers.  During  this  time  he  has  only  missed  one 
directors'  meeting,  this  being  in  January,  1908. 


JOHN  D.  ODLIN. 

John  D.  Odlin,  who  carries  on  general  farming  and  stock-raising  in  Union 
Grove  township,  is  a  native  of  New  Hampshire.  He  was  born  in  Concord, 
January  7,  1855.  His  father,  George  Odlin,  was  born  August  26,  1823,  in 
Exeter,  Rockingham  county,  New  Hampshire,  and  was  a  son  of  James  and 
Martha  (Osborn)  Odlin,  who  were  likewise  natives  of  that  place.  George 
Odlin  was  a  youth  of  seventeen  years  when  he  left  home  and  went  to  Concord 
to  learn  the  printer's  trade,  following  the  business  there  for  twelve  years.  In 
1844  he  purchased  an  interest  in  the  New  Hampshire  Statesman,  which  is 
still  being  published  at  Concord,  and  edited  that  journal  for  seven  years,  after 
which  he  sold  out  in  1851.  However,  he  continued  a  resident  of  Concord  and 
of  Manchester  until  1856,  when  he  left  the  Old  Granite  state  and  made  his 
way  westward  to  Fond  du  Lac,  Wisconsin,  for  the  purpose  of  engaging  in  the 
milling  business.  He  believed  that  he  might  have  better  business  opportuni- 
ties and  secure  success  more  quickly  in  the  Mississippi  valley,  which  was  be- 
ing rapidly  settled.  He  continued  in  milling  until  1858,  when  he  removed 
from  Wisconsin  to  Union  Grove  township,  Whiteside  county,  Illinois.  Here 
he  turned  his  attention  to  farming,  purchasing  an  improved  tract  of  land  on 
section  5.  His  time  and  energies  were  given  to  its  further  development  and 
management  until  1881,  when  he  placed  the  property  in  the  care  of  his  son 
and  removed  to  Morrison,  where  he  lived  retired  in  the  enjoyment  of  well 
earned  rest  until  his  death,  which  occurred  October  26,  1888.  While  he  did  not 
seek  to  figure  prominently  in  any  public  light,  he  lived  as  an  upright,  useful 
citizen,  an  active  and  honorable  business  man,  and  thus  left  to  his  family  an 
untarnished  name. 

On  the  9th  of  September,  1846,  George  Odlin  was  united  in  marriage  to 
MLss  Emma  P.  Dustin,  who  was  born  in  Francistown,  Hillsboro  county,  New 
Hampshire,  and  is  a  lineal  descendant  of  Hannah  Dustin,  whose  capture  by 
the  Indians  forms  one  of  the  romantic  incidents  of  American  history.  Unto 
Mr.  and  Mrs.  Odlin  were  born  three  sons  and  a  daughter:  James  W.  and 
Joseph  A.,  both  now  deceased ;  Mrs.  Martha  Barrell,  living  in  Maine ;  and  John 
D.,  of  this  review. 

The  last  named  was  only  about  a  year  old  at  the  time  of  his  parents'  re- 
moval to  Wisconsin  and  was  but  three  years  of  age  when  brought  to  White- 
side  county^  Here  he  was  reared  amid  conditions  and  environments  sugges- 
tive "of  the  frontier  and  early  formed  habits  of  industry  and  integrity  because 
of  the  lessons  impressed  upon  his  mind  by  his  father.  Through  his  boyhood 
and  youth,  when  not  engaged  in  the  acquirement  of  an  education  in  the  pub- 
lic schools,  he  worked  in  the  fields  and  on  the  12th  of  April,  1883,  he  made 
arrangements  for  having  a  home  of  his  own.  It  was  on  that  day  that  he 


868  HISTORY    OF   WHITESIDE    COUNTY 

married  Miss  Maggie  Entwhistle,  a  daughter  of  J.  W.  Entwhistle,  who  was 
born  December  9,  1855.  The  young  couple  began  their  domestic  life  on  the 
farm  which  has  since  been  their  home  and  their  union  has  been  blessed  with 
one  daughter,  Nellie,  who  was  born  July  19,  1888.  She  still  remains  under 
the  parental  roof  and  has  been  a  successful  teacher  in  the  Lincoln  school. 

Mr.  Odlin  owns  and  operates  one  hundred  and  twenty  acres  of  rich 
farming  land  lying  in  Union  Grove  and  Ustick  townships.  The  fields  are  fer- 
tile, responding  readily  to  the  care  and  labor  which  he  bestows  upon  them,  so 
that  he  annually  gathers  golden  harvests.  In  addition  to  tilling  the  soil  he  also 
raises  stock  and  both  branches  of  his  business  are  proving  profitable.  His 
political  allegiance  is  given  to  the  republican  party  but  the  honors  and  emolu- 
ments of  office  have  no  attraction  for  him,  as  he  prefers  to  give  his  undivided 
attention  to  his  business  interests.  For  half  a  century  he  has  lived  in  this 
county.  It  seems  hardly  possible  that  it  is  within  the  memory  of  living  man 
when  Whiteside  county  was  largely  an  unsettled  and  unimproved  district,  but 
Mr.  Odlin  can  remember  when  many  of  the  good  public  highways  of  the 
present  had  not  been  laid  out;  when  its  cities  were  villages  and  only  com- 
paratively few  of  its  farms  were  cultivated.  He  enjoyed  the  hospitality  of  the 
early  days  and  the  pleasures  which  frontier  life  afforded,  and  as  the  years 
have  gone  by  he  has  lived  to  see  the  many  improvements  wrought  by  time 
and  man  and  has  borne  his  full  share  in  the  work  of  public  progress. 


ALFRED  C.  STANLEY. 

Among  those  who  constitute  the  personnel  of  business  interests  in  Rock 
Falls  is  numbered  Alfred  C.  Stanley,  well  known  as  a  merchant  and  as  super- 
intendent of  the  wood  department  for  the  International  Harvester  Company. 
A  gentleman  of  resourceful  ability,  he  has  always  recognized  that  the  present 
and  not  the  future  holds  the  opportunity  and  that  advancement  depends  upon 
the  wise  use  to  which  the  passing  moment  is  put.  Gradually  he  has  worked 
his  way  upward  until  he  has  become  a  forceful  factor  in  mercantile  and  in- 
dustrial circles  in  this  city. 

He  was  born  in  Naperville  township,  Dupage  county,  Illinois,  September 
10,  1844,  his  parents  being  Urbin  D.  and  Octavia  (Crampton)  Stanley,  both 
of  whom  were  natives  of  New  England,  the  former  born  in  Vermont  and  the 
latter  in  Connecticut.  The  Stanley  family  is  an  old  one  of  that  section  of  the 
country.  The  ancestry  is  English,  but  at  an  early  day  representatives  of  the 
name  came  to  America,  Joel  Stanley,  the  paternal  grandfather,  was  born  in 
Vermont,  where  he  lived  until  after  his  marriage  and  then  removed  westward 
to  Ohio,  settling  near  Cleveland,  where  he  followed  the  occupation  of  farming. 
He  was  twice  married  and  died  at  the  age  of  eighty-five  years.  The  maternal 
grandfather  of  our  subject  was  David  Crampton,  who  was  a  native  of  Con- 
necticut and  of  English  lineage.  He  came  west  with  his  son  at  an  early  day 
and  settled  in  Dupage  county,  Illinois,  where  he  died  when  more  than  eighty- 
four  years  of  age.  His  wife  was  Mrs.  Julia  Crampton. 


HISTORY   OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY  869 

Urbin  D.  Stanley  accompanied  his  parents  on  their  removal  to  Ohio,  where 
he  remained  until  coming  to  Illinois  in  1832.  He  was  a  farmer  by  occupa- 
tion and  following  his  arrival  in  this  state  settled  in  Dupage  county,  which  at 
that  time  was  a  largely  unimproved  and  undeveloped  district.  Only  six  years 
before  had  the  Black  Hawk  war  occurred  and  there  were  still  many  evidences 
of  Indian  occupancy  in  this  part  of  the  state — traces  of  the  red  men  who  for 
long  years  had  wandered  over  this  section  of  the  country.  Mr.  Stanley  pur- 
chased a  tract  of  raw  land  of  one  hundred  and  thirty  acres  and  began  the  im- 
provement and  development  of  the  farm  which  he  continued  to  operate  until 
his  death,  at  the  age  of  forty-four  years,  his  demise  resulting  from  the  kick 
of  a  horse.  His  wife  survived  him  for  some  time  and  passed  away  at  the  age 
of  sixty-five  years.  Both  were  members  of  the  Congregational  church.  Their 
family  numbered  six  children,  two  sons  and  four  daughters,  of  whom  three 
are  now  living:  Lucy,  the  wife  of  David  Jenkins,  of  Hubbell,  Nebraska;  Al- 
fred C. ;  and  Emma  M.,  the  wife  of  Morris  Carnes,  of  Aurora,  Illinois.  The 
three  who  have  passed  away  were  Fidelia,  the  wife  of  Albert  Brown ;  Howard, 
who  died  in  Dupage  county;  and  Julia,  who  was  the  wife  of  Dr.  Thomas 
Eckles. 

Alfred  C.  Stanley  was  reared  in  Dupage  county,  Illinois,  upon  his  father's 
farm,  early  becoming  acquainted  with  the  duties  and  labors  that  fall  to  the 
lot  of  the  agriculturist.  He  attended  the  district  schools  and  the  Naperville 
Seminary  in  the  acquirement  of  his  education,  and  following  the  early  death 
of  his  father,  the  management  and  development  of  the  home  farm  devolved 
upon  him  between  the  ages  of  thirteen  and  twenty-three  years.  At  length,  how- 
ever, he  resolved  to  follow  some  other  pursuit  than  that  of  agriculture  and 
leaving  the  farm  he  entered  the  shops  of  the  Chicago,  Burlington  &  Quincy 
Railroad  at  Aurora,  continuing  with  that  company  for  four  years.  For  a 
time  he  was  in  the  car  department  and  during  the  last  year  and  a  half  was  in 
the  passenger  coach  department.  In  1873  he  came  to  Rock  Falls,  where  he 
followed  the  carpenter's  trade  for  a  year,  on  the  expiration  of  which  period 
he  secured  employment  in  a  coffin  factory.  His  capability  was  so  noteworthy 
that  at  the  end  of  ten  months  he  was  given  charge  of  the  shop  and  made  a 
new  set  of  patterns  for  the  shop.  For  five  years  he  was  connected  with  the 
business  as  a  salaried  representative,  after  which  he  continued  in  the  manu- 
facture of  coffins  under  contract  for  four  years.  On  the  expiration  of  that 
period,  with  the  capital  acquired  through  his  industry  and  careful  expenditure, 
he  established  a  grocery  store,  which  he  conducted  for  twenty-one  consecutive 
years,  his  long  continuance  with  the  trade  indicating  his  success  and  grow- 
ing patronage.  Later  his  sons,  Walter  and  Earl,  took  charge  of  the  business, 
which  they  conducted  until  the  fall  of  1907,  when  Walter  Stanley  retired 
and  A.  C.  Stanley  again  became  active  in  its  management  in  association  with 
his  son  Earl.  For  the  past  year  he  has  also  been  foreman  of  the  wood  depart- 
ment for  the  International  Harvester  Company,  which  employs  in  all  of  its 
departments  at  thi?  place  about  two  hundred  and  fifty  men. 

On  the  27th  of  September,  1866,  Mr.  Stanley  was  married  to  Miss  Hattie 

Terry,  a  daughter  of  Samuel  Terry,  and  unto  them  was  born  a  son,  Harry, 
who  was  an  engineer  on  the  Illinois  Central  Railroad,  being  advanced  to  that 


870  HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY 

position  when  but  twenty-two  years  of  age.  At  the  age  of  twenty-four  he  was 
killed  in  a  railroad  wreck,  leaving  a  wife,  who  bore  the  maiden  name  of  Kate 
Brennan,  and  one  son,  Alfred.  Mrs.  Hattie  Stanley  died  in  1871  and  Mr. 
Stanley  afterward  wedded  Miss  Florence  Lilly,  a  daughter  of  Edward  and 
Lois  (Townsend)  Lilly.  They  have  four  children:  Walter,  Earl,  Lois  and 
Howard.  The  first  named,  who  married  Laura  Wooley,  is  now  engaged  in 
merchandising  in  Seattle,  Washington.  Earl  wedded  Myrtle  Wall  and  is  his 
father's  partner  in  business.  Lois  and  Howard  are  still  at  home. 

Mrs.  Stanley  is  connected  with  the  Christian  Science  church.  Mr.  Stan- 
ley belongs  to  Rock  River  Lodge,  No.  612,  A.  F.  &  A.  M. ;  Sterling  Chapter. 
No.  57,  R.  A.  M. ;  Sterling  Commandery,  No.  57,  K.  T.;  and  Medinah  Temple 
of  the  Nobles  of  the  Mystic  Shrine  at  Chicago.  He  is  also  connected  with  the 
Odd  Fellows  as  a  member  of  Advance  Lodge,  No.  590,  I.  O.  O.  F.,  and  politi- 
cally he  is  a  republican.  In  1888  he  built  a  beautiful  home  at  No.  301  East 
Third  street,  where  he  and  his  family  reside.  He  has  also  erected  his  store 
building  and  the  Whitney  Hotel  and  has  put  up  other  buildings  in  Rock 
Falls  which  have  contributed  in  substantial  measure  to  its  material  develop- 
ment. In  addition  to  his  other  interests,  he  is  a  stockholder  and  director  in 
the  First  National  Bank  of  this  city  and  in  community  affairs  he  has  done  ef- 
fective work  as  the  champion  of  all  interests  and  measures  calculated  to  promote 
public  progress,  municipal  virtue  and  the  interests  of  the  community  at  large. 
He  was  village  trustee  for  one  term,  was  president  of  the  school  board  for  two 
terms,  and  that  he  proved  a  most  capable  supervisor  is  indicated  by  the  fact 
that  he  filled  that  office  for  ten  years.  In  a  review  of  his  life  record  it  will 
be  found  that  his  methods  have  ever  been  such  as  will  bear  the  closest  scrutiny, 
that  he  has  won  advancement  through  following  out  well  defined  plans,  and 
that  in  the  execution  of  his  purpose  he  has  shown  strong  determination,  yield- 
ing at  no  point  where  honorable,  persistent  effort  could  win  success. 


JAMES  BRODERICK. 

Nature  seems  to  have  intended  that  the  evening  of  life  shall  be  a  period 
of  rest,  and  he  who  carefully  and  intelligently  directs  his  labors  through  the 
years  of  early  manhood  and  mature  life  and  avoids  reckless  expenditure  can 
acquire  a  competence  that  will  provide  for  the  wants  of  old  age  without  re- 
course to  further  labor.  Mr.  Broderick  was  for  a  long  period  connected  with 
the  farming  interests  of  Whiteside  county  but  he  is  now  enjoying  a  well 
merited  rest  at  his  home  in  Sterling,  where  he  has  lived  since  1901. 

He  was  born  in  the  parish  of  Turanena,  in  County  Waterford,  Ireland,  in 
1831,  his  parents  being  Thomas  and  Mary  (Whalen)  Broderick,  both  of 
whom  were  natives  of  Ireland.  The  father  conducted  an  extensive  black- 
smithing  business  and  also  owned  a  farm  in  Ireland  but  wishing  to  do  still 
better  by  his  family  came  to  America  in  1850.  attracted  by  the  larger  oppor- 
tunities for  business  activity  and  success.  With  his  wife  and  children  he 
sailed  for  the  new  world  and  spent  one  summer  in  the  state  of  New  York,  but 


HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY  871 

in  the  fall  of  that  year  made  his  way  westward  to  the  Mississippi  valley,  set- 
tling near  Maysville.  Kentucky,  where  he  lived  retired,  while  his  sons  were  in 
the  railroad  service  there.  In  the  spring  of  1855  he  came  with  his  family  to 
Illinois,  locating  in  Ogle  county,  where  for  three  years  he  made  his  home  near 
Polo.  He  next  came  to  AVhiteside  county,  settling  in  Clyde  township,  where 
he  purchased  two  hundred  and  forty  acres  of  land.  Here  his  attention  was 
given  to  the  supervision  of  his  farming  interests,  which  were  carefully  managed 
and  brought  him  a  very  gratifying  financial  return.  He  died  when  almost 
ninety  years  of  age.  His  wife,  who  was  much  younger,  survived  him  for 
about  fifteen  years  and  was  eighty  years  of  age  at  the  time  of  her  demise. 
Their  family  numbered  eight  children,  three  sons  and  five  daughters:  Jo- 
hanna, the  wife  of  Morris  Herbert,  of  Polo,  Illinois ;  Mary,  the  wife  of  Thomas 
Sheehan,  of  Chicago;  Ellen,  the  widow  of  William  Mooney,  of  Sterling; 
John,  a  retired  farmer  living  in  Morrison,  this  state;  James  Broderick,  of 
this  review;  and  Margaret,  Bridget  and  Patrick,  who  are  now  deceased. 

Little  is  known  concerning  the  ancestral  history  of  the  family.  The  pater- 
nal grandfather  died  in  Ireland  but  beyond  that  there  is  no  record  concern- 
ing the  Brodericks.  The  maternal  grandfather  was  James  Whalen,  a  wealthy 
farmer  of  Ireland,  who  died  there  at  an  old  age.  He  was  twice  married  and 
the  only  child  of  the  first  union  was  Mrs.  Mary  (Whalen)  Broderick. 

James  Broderick  was  reared  as  a  farmer  boy  and  throughout  his  busi- 
ness career  followed  agricultural  pursuits.  He  began  his  education  in  the 
schools  of  Ireland  and  later  in  the  school  of  experience  learned  many  valua- 
ble and  practical  lessons.  He  was  a  young  man  when  he  went  to  Ogle  county 
and  with  his  father  he  remained  until  the  latter's  death,  after  which  the  es- 
tate was  divided,  the  three  sons  each  inheriting  eighty  acres  of  land- in  Clyde 
township.  James  Broderick  located  upon  the  farm  which  thus  came  into 
his  possession  and  as  his  financial  resources  increased  he  added  to  it  eighty 
acres  of  prairie  land  and  twenty  acres  of  timber,  so  that  he  had  an  excellent 
farm  of  one  hundred  and  eighty  acres.  To  its  further  development  and  im- 
provement he  devoted  his  energies  and  brought  the  fields  under  a  high  state 
of  cultivation,  annually  gathering  rich  harvests  as  a  reward  for  the  care  and 
labor  he  bestowed  upon  them.  He  continued  to  successfully  carry  on  farm- 
ing until  the  spring  of  1901,  when  he  sold  the  old  homestead  and  removed  to 
Sterling,  where  he  has  since  lived  retired,  his  home  being  at  No.  107  Fifth 
avenue. 

In  1861  Mr.  Broderick  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Ann  Meehan,  who 
was  born  in  Oneida  county,  New  York,  a  daughter  of  John  Meehan.  They 
became  the  parents  of  five  children :  Thomas,  who  died  at  the  age  of  four 
years;  Mary,  the  wife  of  Edward  Junker,  a  resident  of  Chicago,  by  whom  she 
has  four  children,  George,  Ruth,  and  Myrtle  and  Ivy,  twins;  James,  who  is  in 
the  real-estate  business  in  Sterling  and  wedded  Margaret  Flynn,  by  whom  he 
has  five  living  children,  Leo,  Frank.  Herbert,  Leonard  and  Pearl ;  Thomas,  who 
is  also  engaged  in  the  real-estate  business  in  Sterling;  and  John,  who  resides 
at  Fessenclcn,  North  Dakota,  where  he  conducts  a  hotel  and  also  owns  land. 
He  married  Theresa  Junker.  In  August.  1872,  Mr.  Broderick  was  called  upon 
to  mourn  the  loss  of  his  wife,  who  was  a  member  of  the  Catholic  church,  and 


872  HISTORY    OF    WHITESID.E    COUNTY 

two  years  later  he  married  Miss  Catherine  McManus.  There  is  one  child  by 
this  marriage,  Ella,  who  is  now  acting  as  her  father's  housekeeper,  for  the 
mother  died  in  July,  1882,  at  the  age  of  fifty-six  years,  in  the  faith  of  the 
Catholic  church,  of  which  Mr.  Broderick  is  also  a  member. 

HLs  political  support  is  given  to  the  democracy.  He  is  an  honored  and  high- 
ly respected  citizen,  always  industrious,  and  by  good  management  and  hard 
work  he  became  the  owner  of  a  valuable  property  and  won  a  gratifying  com- 
petence for  old  age.  He  has  lived  an  honest  and  upright  life  and  well  de- 
serves mention  in  this  volume. 


ANTHONY  W.  BASTIAN. 

Anthony  W.  Bastian,  sole  proprietor  of  the  Fulton  Journal,  a  semi- 
weekly  independent  paper,  was  born  in  Geauga  county,  Ohio,  June  26,  1846. 
His  parents  were  Van  S.  and  Ann  E.  Bastian,  with  whom  he  removed  to 
Rochester,  New  York,  in  1850.  He  acquired  his  primary  education  in  the 
schools  of  that  city,  passing  through  consecutive  grades  until  1861,  when  he 
became  a  resident  of  Prophetstown,  Whiteside  county,  Illinois.  He  after- 
ward engaged  in  teaching  school  here  and  at  a  later  day  removed  to  Bureau 
county,  Illinois.  Being  ambitious  to  acquire  a  more  thorough  and  compre- 
hensive education,  he  made  his  plans  to  this  end.  His  financial  circum- 
stances did  not  justify  the  necessary  expense  until  he  personally  had  earned 
the  money  with  which  to  pay  his  way  through  college.  He  did  this  by 
teaching  school  and  working  at  farm  labor  and  when  he  had  secured  a 
sufficient  sum  of  money  he  matriculated  in  Dover  College,  where  he  remained 
for  three  terms,  and  also  spent  two  terms  as  a  student  in  Wheaton  College. 
Thus  constantly  broadening  his  knowledge,  he  was  at  length  enabled  to 
successfully  pass  the  required  examination  for  a  state  certificate.  It  was  not 
until  after  his  marriage,  however,  that  he  attended  Wheaton  College.  For 
some  time  he  was  closely  associated  with  educational  interests  in  this  section 
of  the  state.  He  taught  the  Yorktown  school  and  also  organized  and  graded 
the  Tampico  school  and  served  as  principal  for  seven  years. 

In  1881  Mr.  Bastian  came  to  Fulton  and  purchased  a  half  interest  in 
the  Journal  office,  of  which  he  is  now  sole  proprietor.  He  has  since  given 
his  attention  to  the  conduct  of  the  paper  and  the  history  of  the  Journal 
under  his  direction  indicates  his  capable  management  and  his  ability  in  this 
field  of  activity.  Strict  business  principles  are  followed  in  carrying  on  the 
paper.  In  its  mechanical  construction  it  is  most  attractive,  while  its  contents 
make  it  a  most  readable  sheet. 

Mr.  Bastian  was  married  in  Yorktown,  Illinois,  March  4,  1872,  to  Miss 
Eva  A.  Patterson,  a  daughter  of  Orin  and  Lucy  M.  (Chubbuck)  Patterson. 
Mrs.  Bastian  was  born  in  Bureau  county,  Illinois,  and  by  her  marriage  be- 
came the  mother  of  one  son,  Sidney  A.,  who  was  born  December  15,  1875, 
and  died  in  1893. 

Mr.  Bastian  has  been  prominent  and  influential  in  the  public  life  of 
Fulton  and  served  for  two  terms  as  mayor  and  for  two  terms  as  city  clerk. 


A.  W.  BASTIAN 


LIBHAHY 

OF  TH£ 

!W.VEF.8ITY  OF  ILLINOIS 


HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY  875 

He  was  also  chairman  of  the  democratic  county  committee  for  two  terms  and 
for  one  term  a  member  of  the  democratic  state  central  committee.  He  also 
served  as  a  member  of  the  board  of  directors  of  the  Modern  Woodmen  of 
America  and  was  editor  of  the  official  organ  of  the  society  for  two  years.  He 
is  now  today  busily  engaged  in  editing  and  publishing  a  paper  which  had  its 
first  issue  on  the  25th  of  February,  1854,  and  which  for  more  than  a  half 
century  has  been  a  factor  in  molding  public  opinion  in  Fulton  and  White- 
side  county.  He  is  a  man  of  strong  intellectual  force  and  keen  discernment 
and  his  editorials  usually  present  a  clear,  unbiased  view  of  any  vital  situation 
and  point  out  the  possibilities  for  accomplishment  in  connection  therewith. 


WILLIAM  PENN  PALMER. 

William  Penn  Palmer  is  one  of  Sterling's  well  known  citizens,  serving  as 
justice  of  the  peace  and  city  engineer,  at  the  same  time  conducting  a  good  in- 
surance business  with  a  desirable  and  growing  clientage.  He  was  born  near 
Chambersburg,  Franklin  county,  Pennsylvania,  October  9,  1846.  His  pater- 
nal grandfather,  Michael  Palmer,  also  a  native  of  the  Keystone  state,  was  a 
farmer  by  occupation.  Both  he  and  his  wife  lived  to  old  age  and  reared  a 
family  of  three  sons  and  several  daughters,  including  Jonas  Palmer,  who  was 
born  in  Pennsylvania  and  in  early  life  became  a  clerk  in  a  dry-goods  store 
at  Erie,  that  state.  He  afterward  took  charge  of  one  of  his  father's  farms 
near  Chambersburg  and  his  remaining  days  were  spent  in  that  locality,  where 
he  died  in  1892,  when  more  than  seventy  years  of  age.  He  married  Cath- 
erine Flack,  who  died  in  1886  at  the  age  of  seventy  years.  They  were  mem- 
bers of  the  English  branch  of  the  German  Reformed  church.  Mrs.  Palmer 
was  a  daughter  of  Christian  Flack,  who  was  born  near  Chambersburg,  Penn- 
sylvania, and  was  a  tanner  by  trade.  Unto  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Jonas  Palmer  were 
born  ten  children,  six  sons  and  four  daughters:  Margaret,  the  widow  of 
Augustus  Keefer,  of  Chambersburg,  Pennsylvania;  William  Penn,  of  this 
review;  Charles  F.,  of  Chambersburg;  Emma,  the  wife  of  Charles  Dietrick,  of 
St.  Thomas,  Pennsylvania;  Katie,  the  wife  of  John  Mish,  living  near  Mercers- 
burg,  Pennsylvania;  Franklin,  of  Mansfield,  Ohio;  David  D.,  of  Modesta,  Cal- 
ifornia ;  George  and  Harry,  both  deceased ;  and  one  who  died  in  infancy. 

William  Penn  Palmer  spent  his  boyhood  days  in  the  usual  manner  of 
farm  lads  upon  the  farm  in  Franklin  county,  Pennsylvania,  and  attended  the 
district  schools,  while  later  he  continued  his  studies  in  Iron  City  College  at 
Pittsburg,  from  which  he  was  graduated.  Subsequently  he  went  to  Chambers- 
burg, where  he  engaged  in  the  grain  and  coal  business  under  the  firm  style  of 
Kcefer,  Palmer  &  Company  for  several  years.  In  1877  he  came  to  Sterling 
and  had  charge  of  the  lumber  and  grain  business  for  the  firm  of  Langford 
&  Hall  until  he  embarked  in  business  on  his  own  account  in  the  same  line. 
He  was  thus  connected  with  the  trade  interests  of  the  city  for  a  number  of 
years.  Subsequently  he  was  chosen  justice  of  the  peace  and  was  also  employed 
by  the  city  for  a  number  of  years  as  city  engineer  and  superintendent  of 


876  HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY 

streets.  His  public  service  has  been  characterized  by  an  unfaltering  devotion 
to  the  general  good  and  has  won  for  him  the  unqualified  endorsement  and 
approval  of  those  who  are  cognizant  of  the  work  he  has  done  in  public  office. 
At  the  present  writing,  in  1908,  he  is  also  serving  as  township  and  as  city 
assessor,  which  office  he  has  filled  for  the  past  five  years.  He  served  for  sev- 
eral terms  as  a  member  of  the  city  council,  representing  what  was  then  the 
fourth  ward.  He  has  also  been  a  member  of  the  Wallace  school  board  for  a 
number  of  years  and  his  duties  have  ever  been  discharged  with  a  singleness 
of  purpose  that  has  regarded  only  the  best  interests  of  the  public  at  large. 

Mr.  Palmer  was  married  to  Miss  Margaret  Rutt,  a  daughter  of  Michael 
and  Mary  (Baer)  Rutt,  who  were  natives  of  Pennsylvania  and  came  with  the 
Palmers  to  Sterling  in  1877.  They  had  one  son  and  one  daughter,  John  and 
Margaret.  Both  parents  are  now  deceased.  Unto  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Palmer  have 
been  born  two  daughters  and  a  son.  Bertie  is  the  wife  of  E.  V.  Crumb,  of 
Rockford,  Illinois,  and  they  have  three  children,  Helen,  Burritt  and  William 
Palmer  Crumb.  Minnie  is  the  wife  of  Ralph  Copeland,  of  Rockford,  Illinois. 
John  G.  is  a  civil  engineer  in  the  employ  of  the  United  States  government  and 
lives  at  Washington,  D.  C.  He  married  Bertie  Wilkins,  of  Tiskilwa,  Illinois, 
and  they  have  two  children,  Catharine  and  William  Wilkins. 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  Palmer  were  originally  members  of  the  German  Reformed 
church  but  as  there  was  no  organization  of  that  denomination  in  Sterling  they 
placed  their  membership  in  the  Presbyterian  church  here.  They  reside  at  No. 
308  Avenue  G,  where  Mr.  Palmer  erected  a  good  residence  about  1894.  His 
political  allegiance  is  given  unfalteringly  to  the  republican  party,  while  fra- 
ternally he  is  connected  with  Rock  River  Lodge,  No.  612,  A.  F.  &  A.  M. ; 
Sterling  Chapter,  No.  57,  R.  A.  M.;  and  Sterling  Commandery,  No.  57,  K.  T. 
For  more  than  thirty  years  he  has  resided  in  Sterling  and  is  well  known  here 
as  a  man  of  many  friends — a  fact  indicative  of  the  good  qualities  he  has  dis- 
played in  public  and  private  life. 


CONRAD  HARMS. 

Conrad  Harms  dates  his  residence  in  Whiteside  county  from  1866.  Ar- 
riving here  in  July,  of  that  year,  he  took  up  his  abode  on  section  3,  Hopkins 
township,  and  in  the  intervening  years  has  been  connected  with  agricultural 
interests  in  the  county.  He  was  born  in  Jever,  Germany,  October  22,  1838. 
His  father,  J.  C.  Harms,  a  native  of  Oldenburg,  Germany,  was  born  in  1804 
and  reached  the  age  of  seventy-four  years,  passing  away  in  1878,  his  remains 
being  interred  in  the  cemetery  of  the  Lutheran  church  of  Oldenburg. 
Throughout  his  entire  business  career  he  followed  tailoring  in  the  town  of 
Jever.  In  1836  he  was  married  to  Miss  Catherine  Miller  and  unto  them  were 
born  six  children:  Conrad,  of  this  review;  Carl,  who  died  in  1876;  Carl,  the 
second  of  the  name,  who  died  in  1878 ;  Anna,  Minnie,  who  died  in  1868 ;  and 
Fredericka,  who  is  residing  in  Sterling  and  is  the  wife  of  Louis  Sunderman, 
identified  with  the  business  interests  of  the  citv.  The  mother  of  this  family 


HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY  877 

was  born  in  1809  and  died  in  1849,  her  grave  also  being  made  in  the  Luth- 
eran church  cemetery  of  Oldenburg. 

Conrad  Harms,  whose  name  introduces  this  review,  was  educated  in  the 
common  schools  but  his  opportunities  in  that  direction  were  somewhat  lim- 
ited, for  at  a  very  early  age  he  went  to  work  on  a  farm.  He  was  first  em- 
ployed by  Henry  Hayungs,  near  Jever,  Germany,  and  continued  in  that  line 
of  activity  until  thirty-four  years  of  age.  His  skill  and  efficiency  gradually 
increasing,  his  wages  were  also  enlarged  proportionately  in  accordance  with 
the  scale  of  wages  paid  in  his  native  country,  but  feeling  that  he  would  have 
better  opportunities  in  the  new  world,  he  resolved  to  come  to  America  and 
seek  his  fortune  in  the  United  States.  Accordingly,  he  made  the  voyage 
across  the  Atlantic  in  1866  and,  as  stated,  arrived  in  Whiteside  county  in  July 
of  that  year.  He  has  since  been  identified  with  the  agricultural  interests  of 
this  portion  of  the  state  and  now  makes  his  home  on  section  8,  Sterling  town- 
ship, where  he  owns  one  of  the  best  improved  farms  of  Whiteside  county,  for 
which  he  paid  eighty-five  dollars  per  acre  seven  years  ago.  This  has  since 
increased  in  value  owing  to  the  natural  advance  in  prices  and  also  owing  to 
the  improvements  which  he  has  made  upon  it. 

In  1875  Mr.  Harms  was  married  to  Miss  Mary  Tiarks,  of  Hooksiel,  Ger- 
many, a  daughter  of  Fred  and  Christine  (Remners)  Tiarks.  Her  mother 
was  born  in  Jever,  Germany,  in  1809  and  departed  this  life  in  1887.  The 
father  was  born  about  1805  in  Jever  and  passed  away  in  1885.  Unto  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  Harms  have  been  born  seven  children :  Mary  Catherine  is  the  wife 
of  George  Onken,  a  resident  of  Whiteside  county.  Jacob  Fred  married  Alice 
Kophammer,  a  native  of  Whiteside  county.  Charlie  wedded  Margaret  Boesen, 
who  is  living  in  this  county.  Anna  is  the  wife  of  Ed.  Mieners,  also  living  in 
Whiteside  county.  Henry  and  Will  are  at  home.  They  also  lost  one  child, 
Charlie  Conrad,  who  died  in  1887. 

Mr.  Harms  possesses  many  of  the  sterling  characteristics  of  the  German 
race.  He  possesses  the  energy  and  determination  which  lead  to  success  and  also 
the  resolute  spirit  which  promises  effective  effort  in  the  business  world.  He 
has  never  had  occasion  to  regret  his  determination  to  seek  a  home  in  the 
United  States,  for  here  he  has  found  the  opportunities  which  he  desired  and 
riot  only  gained  a  comfortable  competency  but  has  also  won  the  respect  and 
good  will  of  a  large  majority  of  those  with  whom  he  has  been  brought  in  con- 
tact. He  has  found  here  a  pleasant  home  and  many  friends  and  is  thoroughly 
content  with  his  adopted  country. 


EDWARD  0.  HILLS. 

Edward  0.  Hills  is  a  member  of  the  firm  conducting  an  extensive  hot- 
house business  at  Fulton  and  their  enterprise  is  the  leading  one  of  this  char- 
acter in  the  place.  He  has  wrought  out  his  success  along  well  defined  lines  of 
labor,  his  energy  and  determination  being  the  salient  features  in  his  business 
career.  His  birth  occurred  in  Sterling,  Whiteside  county,  Illinois,  August 


878  HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY 

29,  1867,  his  parents  being  Josiah  and  Lavina  (Hill)  Hills,  who  came  to 
Whiteskle  county  at  an  early  day,  probably  about  1860.  They  settled  in  Ster- 
ling and  the  father,  who  was  a  tanner  by  trade,  established  one  of  the  first, 
if  not  the  first,  tanneries  of  Sterling,  a  business  which  he  conducted  success- 
fully for  a  long  period.  He  not  only  did  the  tanning  but  converted  the 
leather  into  a  finished  product,  for  which  he  found  a  ready  sale  on  the  mar- 
ket. He  was  located  at  Sparta,  Illinois,  from  1871  until  1877,  when  he 
turned  to  Sterling,  where  he  continued  business  in  the  same  line  in  which  he 
had  formerly  been  engaged.  This  he  followed  until  about  1881,  or  1882,  when 
he  retired  from  that  field  of  activity.  He  afterward  established  a  dairy  busi- 
ness, which  he  conducted  with  success  until  1895.  He  then  retired  from  all 
active  work  and  removed  to  Tallapoosa.  Georgia,  where  he  resided  until  1899. 
In  that  year  he  again  came  to  Illinois  and  established  his  home  in  Morrison, 
where  he  is  now  residing  in  his  eightieth  year,  enjoying  remarkable  health  for 
one  of  his  age,  for  he  is  a  splendidly  preserved  man.  On  the  25th  of  January, 
1908,  for  the  first  time  in  thirty  years  he  was  obliged  to  call  in  the  services 
of  a  physician.  His  wife  died  September  17,  1906,  at  the  age  of  seventy-four 
years.  They  were  the  parents  of  five  children,  four  of  whom  reached  adult 
age;  Ella;  Cora,  the  wife  of  Clarence  B.  Pierce,  of  Ustick  township,  this  coun- 
ty; E.  0.  and  Fred  A.,  who  is  a  member  of  the  firm  of  Hills  Brothers  &  Kirman. 

Edward  0.  Hills  pursued  his  education  in  the  schools  of  Sterling  and  at 
the  age  of  twenty-two  years  secured  a  position  in  the  office  of  the  city  engi- 
neer and  while  thus  engaged  gained  a  comprehensive  knowledge  of  civil 
engineering.  He  has  since  followed  that  business  in  connection  with  other 
enterprises  and  in  1902  was  elected  county  surveyor,  to  which  office  he  was 
re-elected  in  1904.  In  this  position  his  knowledge  of  civil  engineering  and 
surveying  was  called  into  constant  use  and  that  his  service  was  capable  and  ef- 
fective is  indicated  by  the  fact  that  he  was  chosen  for  a  second  term.  Previ- 
ous to  his  election  to  the  office  which  he  now  holds  he  was  during  1897  and 
1898  employed  by  the  government,  having  charge  of  a  crew  of  men  in  mak- 
ing geological  surveys  through  the  states  of  Utah  and  Wyoming.  In  1900  he 
was  employed  as  inspector  by  the  government  of  the  Hennepin  feeder  to  the 
main  canal  running  through  this  county.  About  1897  he  was  appointed  city 
engineer  of  Morrison,  a  position  which  he  filled  until  1908,  when  his  other 
interests  became  of  so  much  importance  that  he  felt  that  he  could  no  longer 
afford  to  give  the  necessary  time  to  his  official  duties  of  civil  engineer  and 
withdrew  from  the  office. 

In  1905  Mr.  Hills  in  company  with  L.  G.  MacKinzie  established  a  busi- 
ness for  the  production  of  hothouse  plants  and  vegetables.  Mr.  MacKinzie 
afterward  sold  his  interest  to  Fred  A.  Hills  and  our  subject  and  in  1907  John 
E.  Kirman,  a  .brother-in-law,  purchased  an  interest  in  the  business  which 
now  conducted  under  the  firm  style  of  Hills  Brothers  &  Kirman.  This  firm 
makes  a  specialty  of  growing  hothouse  cucumbers  and  tomatoes.  Their  busi- 
ness has  reached  extensive  proportions  and  is  now  one  of  the  profitable  enter- 
prises of  Fulton. 

Mr.  Hills  was  married  in  1896  to  Miss  Alice  Kirman,  of  Morrison,  a 
daughter  of  Mrs.  Mary  Kirman,  one  of  the  early  settlers  of  this  county,  and  a 


HISTORY    OF   WHITESIDE    COUNTY  879 

sister  of  John  E.  Kirman.  Both  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Hills  hold  membership  in  the 
Universalist  church.  Politically  he  is  a  republican  and  fraternally  is  con- 
nected with  Grove  Lodge,  No.  50,  T.  0.  0.  F.  He  has  led  a  very  busy  and  use- 
ful life,  his  varied  interests  making  constant  demand  upon  his  time  and 
attention  and  throughout  his  career  he  has  made  that  steady  progress  which 
is  the  outcome  of  close  application,  determination  and  ability. 


GEORGE  M.  ADAIR. 

George  M.  Adair,  following  the  occupation  of  farming  in  Coloma  town- 
ship, his  time  and  energies  being  devoted  to  the  improvement  of  an  excellent 
farm  of  one  hundred  and  sixty  acres,  was  born  in  Monroe,  Green  county,  Wis- 
consin. November  10,  1855.  His  parents  were  George  and  Martha  (Simpkins) 
Adair,  both  of  whom  were  natives  of  Canada,  whence  they  removed  to  Wis- 
consin about  1853.  The  father  was  a  blacksmith  by  trade.  He  lived  at  home 
until  sixteen  years  of  age  and  then  served  a  two  years'  apprenticeship  at 
blacksmithing,  after  which  he  followed  the  trade  as  a  journeyman  for  six 
years.  In  the  meantime  he  carefully  saved  his  earnings,  so  that  on  the  expira- 
tion of  that  period  he  was  enabled  to  embark  in  business  on  his  own  account, 
opening  a  shop  in  Canada.  When  two  years  had  passed  he  removed  to  Wis- 
consin, where  he  established  himself  in  his  trade,  remaining  there  until  1860. 
He  afterward  went  to  Michigan,  where  he  continued  until  the  fall  of  1871, 
when  he  returned  to  Wisconsin  and  acquired  the  same  business  he  had  left 
there.  Later  he  again  sold  out  and  removed  to  Moline,  Illinois,  where  he 
engaged  in  blacksmithing  for  two  years.  In  1879  he  came  to  Rock  Falls, 
where  he  opened  a  smithy  and  as  the  result  of  his  efficient  workmanship  in 
his  chosen  occupation  soon  gained  a  liberal  and  growing  patronage  that 
brought  to  him  a  comfortable  competence.  Here  he  prospered  and  remained 
until  his  death,  which  occurred  in  1907.  He  was  a  son  of  John  and  Anna 
(Teezel)  Adair,  who  were  natives  of  New  Jersey.  Further  than  this  noth- 
ing is  known  concerning  the  ancestral  history  of  the  family. 

George  M.  Adair  accompanied  his  parents  on  their  various  removals 
during  the  days  of  his  boyhood  and  youth  and  acquired  a  public-school  edu- 
cation. When  twenty-one  years  of  age  he  started  out  upon  an  independent 
business  career,  working  for  the  Keystone  Manufacturing  Company  at  Rock 
Falls.  That  he  was  capable,  energetic  and  faithful  is  plainly  indicated  by  the 
fact  that  his  connection  with  that  company  covered  the  period  from  1876  until 
1905.  He  worked  his  way  upward  from  one  position  to  another,  each  bring- 
ing added  responsibilities,  and  for  some  time  served  as  foreman.  After  sever- 
ing his  connection  with  the  Keystone  Company  in  1905  he  invested  his  sav- 
ings in  the  farm  which  he  now  occupies,  comprising  one  hundred  and  sixty 
acres  of  rich  and  productive  land,  all  now  in  fine  condition.  His  fields  are 
well  cultivated,  bringing  forth  productive  crops.  In  the  midst  of  the  farm 
stands  a  beautiful  country  residence  with  pleasant  surroundings  and  there  are 
also  commodious  barns  and  outbuildings  giving  ample  shelter  for  grain  and 


880  HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY 

stock.  Everything  about  the  place. indicates  his  enterprising  spirit  and  his 
labors  have  brought  to  him  a  satisfactory  reward  since  taking  up  the  work  of 
the  fields.  He.  is  justly  accounted  one  of  the  representative  agriculturists  of 
the  community  and  his  farm  yearly'  returns  to  him  rich  crops. 

On  the  14th  of  September,  1886,  Mr.  Adair  was  married  to  Miss  Hat- 
tie  Adkins,  a  daughter  of  Buford  D.  and  Margaret  F.  (Bivens)  Adkins,  who 
were  natives  of  Kentucky,  born  near  Louisville.  The  father  went  to  Missouri 
at.  any  early  day,  settling  in  Platte  county.  Two  children  have  been  born 
unto  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Adair,  Willie  and  Stanley.  The  family  are  well  known  in 
Rock  Falls  and  in  Coloma  township,  where  they  have  an  extensive  circle  of 
warm  friends. 


JACOB  WETZELL,   JR. 

Jacob  Wetzell,  Jr.,  is  the  owner  of  an  excellent  farm  of  one  hundred  and 
seventy-two  acres  situated  on  section  9,  Genesee  township.  It  is  a  rich  and 
productive  tract  of  land,  splendidly  improved  with  every  modern  convenience 
and  accessory  known  to  the  model  farm  of  the  twentieth  century.  It  was  in 
Genesee  township  that  Jacob  Wetzell  first  opened  his  eyes  to  the  light  of  day 
on  the  15th  of  May,  1856,  his  parents  being  Jacob  and  Susan  (Bidler)  Wet- 
zell. The  father  was  a  native  of  Stark  county,  Ohio,  born  September  12,  1814, 
while  the  mother's  birth  occurred  in  Pennsylvania  on  the  27th  of  September, 
1815.  They  arrived  in  Illinois  in  1855  and  soon  afterward  the  father  in- 
vested in  land  in  Whiteside  county,  where  he  continued  to  make  his  home  until 
his  demise.  For  almost  a  half  century  he  lived  within  its  borders  and  wit- 
nessed its  transformation  as  it  took  on  all  of  the  evidences  of  a  modern  and 
progressive  civilization,  becoming  one  of  the  rich  agricultural  districts  of 
the  state,  while  in  its  midst  sprang  up  important  industrial  and  commercial 
concerns  that  constitute  the  elements  of  a  city's  growth  and  prosperity.  He 
died  January  5,  1902,  and  his  wife  passed  away  later  in  the  same  year.  They 
were  the  parents  of  ten  children,  namely :  Henry,  of  Whiteside  county ; 
Sarah,  the  wife  of  N.  H.  Buntley,  of  Carroll  county,  Illinois;  Elizabeth,  who 
became  the  wife  of  J.  B.  Overholser  and  resides  in  Sterling;  Samuel,  also  of 
Sterling;  Mary,  the  wife  of  B.  F.  Buntley,  of  Genesee  township;  Catherine, 
the  wife  of  William  Peugh ;  Frank,  deceased ;  Jacob,  of  this  review ;  and  Caro- 
line and  an  infant,  who  are  likewise  deceased. 

Ih  early  boyhood  Jacob  Wetzell  was  sent  as  a  pupil  to  the  public  schools 
and  thereby  acquired  his  education.  During  the  periods  of  vacation  he  was 
trained  in  the  work  of  the  home  farm  and  lessons  concerning  the  value  of  in- 
dustry, enterprise  and  integrity  were  early  impressed  on  his  mind.  He  re- 
mained on  the  old  home  farm  until  thirty-four  years  of  age,  when  he  was 
married,  the  lady  of  his  choice  being  Miss  Julia  Kennedy,  who  was  born  in 
Whiteside  county,  November  26,  1859,  a  daughter  of  William  and  Emeline 
(Bailey)  Kennedy.  The  father  was  born  in  Washington  county,  New 
York,  October  8,  1828,  while  the  mother's  birth  occurred  in  the  Empire  state 


HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY  881 

on  the  14th  of  August,  1840.  They  were,  the  parents  of  eight  children :  Mary, 
deceased;  Mrs.  Wetzell;  Harold,  of  Clyde  township;  Jefferson,  who  resides  in 
Missouri ;  Harvey,  of  Whiteside  county ;  Lydia,  the  wife  of  J.  M.  Morrison,  of 
Texas;  Cora,  at  home;  and  one  who  died  in  infancy.  The  mother  has  now 
passed  away  but  the  fa.ther  still  survives.  He  lost  his  wife  in  1888. 

Following  his  marriage  Mr.  Wetzell  purchased  one  hundred  and  seventy- 
two  acres 'of  land  on  section  9,  Genesee  township,  and  it  has  since  been  his 
home.  It  now  constitutes  one  of  the  linest  farms  of  the  county  and  in  its 
midst  stands  a  palatial  and  beautiful  country  residence,  built  in  modern  style 
of  architecture  and  containing  fourteen  rooms.  It  is  supplied  with  all  the 
latest  conveniences  and  equipments  and  every  necessary  outbuilding  for  the 
shelter  of  grain  and  stock  is  also  found  upon  the  place.  These  have  been 
built  with  a  view  to  convenience  and  the  farm  is  splendidly  equipped.  In 
addition  to  tilling  the  soil  in  the  production  of  crops  best  adapted  to  climatic 
conditions  here,  Mr.  Wetzell  also  makes  a  specialty  of  raising  Poland  China 
hogs. 

Unto  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Wetzell  have  been  born  five  children :  Harold,  now 
deceased;  Frank  and  Leslie,  in  school;  Glynn  and  Lyle,  at  home.  The  par- 
ents are  consistent  members  of  the  Methodist  Episcopal  church.  Mr.  Wetzell 
votes  with  the  republican  party  and  for  several  years  has  served  as  school  direc- 
tor, the  cause  of  public  education  finding  in  him  a  warm  champion.  Other- 
wise he  has  never  held  nor  desired  public  office,  for  he  feels  that  his  farming 
interests  make  full  claim  upon  his  time  and  energies.  That  he  has  prospered 
as  the  years  have  passed  is  indicated  in  the  appearance  of  his  beautiful  home 
and  well  kept  farm,  while  throughout  the  county  it  is  a  well  known  fact  that 
his  name  is  an  honored  one  on  commercial  paper. 


JOHN  AGGEN. 

John  Aggen,  extensively  engaged  in  raising  vegetables  in  Fulton,  was 
born  in  Holland  on  the  3d  of  March,  1858,  a  son  of  John  and  Ledena  (Wier- 
sema)  Aggen,  who  died  in  that  country.  In  1878  John  Aggen  crossed  the 
Atlantic  to  the  United  States,  locating  in  Chicago,  where  he  was  employed  as 
a  farm  hand  for  three  years.  On  the  expiration  of  that  period,  in  association 
with  his  brothers,  he  engaged  in  gardening  on  leased  land,  following  that  line 
<>f  activity  for  twenty-two  years  in  and  near  the  western  metropolis.  Arriving 
in  Fulton,  Whiteside  county,  in  1903,  he  here  established  the  first  hothouse 
devoted  to  the  production  of  lettuce,  onions  and  other  vegetables  in  this  part 
of  the  state.  His  present  plant  was  erected  in  1906  and  is  one  of  the  most 
extensive  in  the  entire  county,  Mr.  Aggen  having  spent  some  twenty-five 
hundred  dollars  in  perfecting  the  establishment,  which  cannot  be  excelled  in 
the  beauty  of  its  surroundings.  It  is  located  in  one  of  the  most  desirable  spots 
in  the  town  of  Fulton,  being  near  the  busineas  center  and  not  far  from  Lyons 
and  Clinton,  Iowa.  As  previously  stated,  Mr.  Aggen  arrived  in  this  country 
in  1878,  handicapped  by  a  lack  of  funds  and  unfamiliarity  with  the  English 
language.  In  spite  of  these  serious  disadvantages  he  resolutely  set  to  work, 


882  HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY 

eventually  winning  that  measure  of  success  which  is  always  the  reward  of 
unremitting  industry  and  indefatigable  energy,  supplemented  by  sound  judg- 
ment and  keen  discrimination  in  business  affairs. 

Mr.  Aggen  has  been  married  twice.  He  was  first  wedded  in  Chicago,  in 
1886,  to  Miss  Grace  Dyhuis,  of  that  city,  a  daughter  of  Peter  Dyhuis.  She 
passed  away  in  1891,  leaving  one  son,  John,  and  in  1892  our  subject  was  again 
married,  his  second  union  being  with  Mrs.  Mary  Wilkins,  nee  Muldimaker, 
a  native  of  Holland.  Her  parents,  also  natives  of  that  country,  emigrated  to 
America  in  1882,  locating  in  Fulton,  where  the  father's  death  occurred  in 
1891,"  while  his  wife  survived  him  until  May,  1903.  Mrs.  Aggen  has  three 
living  children  by  her  first  husband :  Glaus ;  Josie,  the  wife  of  Jacob  Wierse- 
ma;  and  Cornelius.  By  her  present  marriage  she  has  two  children,  Tessie 
and  Render. 

Mr.  Aggen  is  independent  in  politics,  and,  though  he  generally  votes  the 
republican  ticket,  does  not  consider  himself  bound  by  party  ties,  always  cast- 
ing his  ballot  for  the  candidate  whom  he  believes  best  qualified  for  office. 
Both  he  and  his  wife  are  members  of  the  Dutch  Reformed  Church  of  America 
and  are  highly  esteemed  throughout  the  community  as  people  of  genuine  per- 
sonal worth  and  sterling  traits  of  heart  and  mind.  The  hope  that  led  him  to 
leave  his  native  land  and  seek  a  home  in  America  has  been  more  than  realized. 
He  found  the  opportunities  he  sought, — which,  by  the  way,  are  always  open 
to  the  ambitious,  energetic  man, — and  making  the  best  of  these  he  has  stead- 
ily worked  his  way  upward,  his  name  being  now  enrolled  among  the  pros- 
perous and  enterprising  residents  of  Whiteside  county. 


WILLIAM  F.  GOULD. 

Through  the  years  of  an  active  business  career  William  F.  Gould  fol- 
lowed farming  and  carpentering,  but  is  now  living  retired  in  Sterling,  his 
prosperity  in  former  years  supplying  him  with  the  necessities  and  comforts 
and  some  of  the  luxuries  of  life.  He  has  long  since  passed  the  Psalmist's 
span  of  three  score  years  and  ten,  his  birth  having  occurred  in  Bradford 
county,  Pennsylvania,  July  20,  1829.  In  both  the  paternal  and  maternal 
lines  he  represents  old  families  of  the  Empire  state.  His  two  grandfathers, 
William  Gould  and  Gideon  De  Groff,  were  natives  of  New  York,  were  farm- 
ers by  occupation  and  lived  to  old  age.  Tobias  Gould,  father  of  our  subject, 
was  born  in  Saratoga  county,  New  York,  was  reared  to  agricultural  pursuits 
and  made  farming  his  life  work.  Removing  to  Pennsylvania,  he  settled  in 
Bradford  county,  where  he  conducted  a  farm  and  also  filled  the  office  of 
county  sheriff  for  a  time.  In  early  manhood  he  married  Diana  De  Groff, 
likewise  a  native  of  Saratoga  county,  New  York.  His  death  occurred  in 
1831  and  his  widow  afterward  married  Samuel  Scott.  By  her  first  marriage 
she  had  three  sons  and  a  daughter,  of  whom  only  William  F.  Gould  is  now 
living.  By  her  second  husband  she  had  two  daughters,  one  of  whom  has 
nassed  away,  while  Mary  Jane  Scott  is  now  the  widow  of  Charles  Avers  and 
resides  in  Sheldon,  Iowa. 


LIBRARY 

OF  THE 

UNIVERSITY  OF  ILLINOIS 


WILLIAM  F.  GOULD 


MRS.  WILLIAM  F.  GOULD 


LIBRARY 

OF  TH€ 

UNIVERSITY  OF  ILLINOIS 


HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY  887 

William  F.  Gould  was  only  about  eighteen  months  old  when  his  father 
died.  He  lived  with  his  mother  to  the  age  of  fourteen  years  and  acquired 
a  common-school  education.  He  then  traveled  westward  by  steamer  to  Wis- 
consin, settling  in  what  was  then  Racine  county,  but  is  now  Kenosha  county. 
This  was  in  1844.  A  few  years  later  he  returned  to  the  Empire  state,  taking 
up  his  abode  in  the  town  of  Cato,  Cayuga  county,  where  he  learned  and  fol- 
lowed the  trade  of  a  carpenter  and  joiner,  being  identified  with  building 
operations  in  the  east  for  a  number  of  years.  In  1858  he  came  to  Illinois, 
settling  in  Whiteside  county,  and  for  a  time  worked  at  his  trade,  after  which 
he  purchased  a  farm  of  forty-eight  acres  in  Jordan  township,  on  which  a 
small  frame  house  had  been  erected  by  the  first  settler,  he  being  the  second 
to  locate  there.  Subsequently  he  bought  forty  acres  more  from  the  Illinois 
Central  Railroad  and  still  later  another  forty-acre  tract  from  Joseph  Sowles. 
He  improved  all  this,  bringing  the  land  under  a  high  state  of  cultivation,  his 
fields  producing  rich  crops  of  cereals  best  adapted  to  soil  and  climate.  Upon 
that  place  he  made  his  home  until  1882,  when  he  rented  his  farm  and  took 
up  his  abode  in  Sterling,  where  he  has  since  made  his  home.  He  followed 
his  trade  until  about  1904,  since  which  time  he  has  lived  retired.  He  was 
thus  for  twenty-two  years  identified  with  building  operations  in  Sterling, 
and  many  substantial  structures  of  the  city  are  an  indication  of  his  handi- 
work and  skill.  He  now  owns  a  good  home  at  No.  208  East  Seventh  street, 
two  other  residences  and  still  other  town  property. 

The  lady  who  now  bears  his  name  and  whom  he  wedded  on  the  14th  of 
April,  1853,  was  in  her  maidenhood  Miss  Mary  A.  Davis,  a  daughter  of  Esek 
and  Charlotte  (Ward)  Davis.  The  former  was  a  son  of  Ichabod  Davis,  who 
removed  from  Argyle  to  New  Haven,  New  York,  and  there  died  at  an  ad- 
vanced age,  while  his  wife,  Peace  Davis,  passed  away  in  middle  life.  They 
were  the  parents  of  ten  children.  The  maternal  grandparents  of  Mrs.  Gould 
were  Adam  and  Sarah  Ward.  The  former  was  one  of  the  patriots  of  the 
American  army  in  the  Revolutionary  war  and  lived  in  Saratoga,  New  York. 
Esek  Davis  was  a  native  of  Argyle  and  his  wife  of  Saratoga  county,  New 
York.  They  removed  to  New  Haven,  Oswego  county,  that  state,  where  Mrs. 
Gould  was  born  April  2,  1830.  There  the  parents  remained  for  some  time 
and  then  went  to  Cayuga  county,  where  her  father  died  at  the  venerable  age 
of  ninety-seven  years,  while  his  wife  reached  the  age  of  eighty-one  years. 
They  were  the  parents  of  nine  children,  four  daughters  and  five  sons,  but 
only  three  are  now  living:  Mrs.  Mary  A.  Gould;  Martin  L.,  of  Cayuga 
county,  New  York ;  and  Elizabeth  E,  the  widow  of  John  Laird  and  now  a 
resident  of  Cayuga  county,  New  York. 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  Gould  have  but  two  children.  The  elder,  Charles  W. 
Gould,  who  is  conducting  a  typewriter  exchange  in  Seattle,  Washington, 
married  Etta  Depell,  now  deceased,  and  to  them  were  born  three  children, 
Mabel,  Edna  and  William  J.  After  losing  his  first  wife  Charles  W.  Gould 
wedded  Nettie  Dudley.  Frank  E.  Gould  is  a  traveling  salesman  living  in 
Chicago  and  married  Margaret  Tighe,  by  whom  he  has  one  child,  Frank  E. 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  Gould  are  members  of  the  Baptist  church  and  are  much 
esteemed  as  people  of  genuine  worth.  He  is  a  veteran  of  the  Civil  war,  hav- 


888  HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY 

ing  enlisted  on  the  14th  of  March,  1865,  as  a  member  of  Company  E,  Thirty- 
fourth  Illinois  Volunteer  Infantry,  with  which  he  served  until  the  close  of 
hostilities.  He  was  on  detailed  duty  most  of  the  time  and  after  the  war  re- 
turned to  his  farm.  He  is  now  a  member  of  AVilliam  Robinson  Post,  G.  A. 
R.,  of  Sterling.  He  has  been  one  of  the  world's  workers  and  his  diligence 
and  persistency  of  purpose  constitute  the  basis  upon  which  he  has  builded 
the  success  that  now  enables  him  to  live  retired. 


JOHN  G.  LOOS. 

John  G.  Loos,  who  since  1892  has  been  engaged  in  the  plumbing  and 
steam-fitting  business  in  Sterling,  his  place  of  business  being  at  No.  122  West 
Third  street,  is  one  of  the  worthy  citizens  that  Germany  has  furnished  to  this 
state.  He  was  born  in  Wurtemberg,  on  the  30th  of  June,  1849,  a  son  of  Mar- 
tin and  Christina  (Glasser)  Loos,  both  of  whom  were  natives  of  the  father- 
land. The  father  was  a  cooper  by  trade  and  followed  that  business  at  Unter- 
Riexingen,  which  was  the  place  of  his  birth,  and  there  he  spent  his  entire  life, 
passing  away  in  1888,  at  the  age  of  seventy-seven  years.  The  wife  and 
mother  was  born  in  1814  and  died  in  1900,  when  she  was  more  than  eighty- 
six  years  of  age.  Both  the  parents  were  members  of  the  Lutheran  church. 

John  G.  Loos  of  this  review  is  one  of  a  family  of  six  children  and  was 
reared  in  the'  fatherland  to  the  age  of  nineteen  years.  He  there  acquired  a 
good  common-school  education,  after  which  he  learned  the  cooper's  trade,  which 
he  followed  until  1880.  In  1868,  having  heard  favorable  reports  concerning 
the  opportunities  and  advantages  to  be  enjoyed  in  the  new  world,  he  crossed 
the  Atlantic,  and  upon  reaching  American  shores  at  once  made  his  way  to 
Belvidere.  Illinois,  where  he  remained  for  fifteen  months.  He  then  went  to 
Chicago,  spending  his  time  there  until  the  spring  of  1872,  subsequent  to 
which  time  he  removed  to  Sterling,  arriving  here  in  June  of  that  year.  He 
first  engaged  in  the  cooperage  business  in  this  city,  following  that  occupation 
until  1880,  after  which  he  followed  the  carpenter's  trade  for  ten  years.  In 
1892  he  embarked  in  the  plumbing  and  steam-fitting  business,  in  which  he  has 
built  up  a  good  trade,  so  that  he  is  today  numbered  among  the  prominent 
and  progressive  business  men  of  Sterling.  He  has  a  well  equipped  establish- 
ment at  No.  122  West  Third  street.  His  success  is  well  merited,  for  he  ever 
follows  the  most  honorable  methods  in  his  business  relations,  being  prompt 
and  faithful  to  the  terms  of  a  contract,  so  that  he  has  won  the  confidence  and 
good  will  of  all  with  whom  he  has  had  business  dealings. 

Mr.  Loos  was  married  on  the  4th  of  September,  1870,  to  Miss  Minnie 
Kruse,  a  daughter  of  Charles  and  Fred  Kruse,  who  were  natives  of  Prussia  and 
emigrated  to  America  in  1865,  at  which  time  they  settled  in  Chicago,  Illinois. 
Of  their  family  of  six  children,  three  of  the  number  still  survive.  Mr.  Kruse 
passed  away  in  Chicago,  at  the  age  of  sixty-eight  years,  having  been  preceded 
by  his  wife,  who  died  several  years  prior  to  his  demise. 

The  marriage  of  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Loos  has  been  blessed  with  ten  children, 
seven  sons  and  three  daughters:  John  A.,  Carl  C.,  Emma  C.,  Fred  0.,  Albert, 


HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY  889 

Henry,  Minnie,  William,  Anna,  and  Walter.  John  A.,  like  his  father,  is  en- 
gaged in  the  plumbing  business.  He  wedded  Dora  Deusch,  of  Sterling,  by 
whom  he  has  three  sons,  Harry,  Arthur  and  Lester.  Carl  C.,  also  engaged  in 
the  plumbing  business,  wedded  Christina  Brandlin,  by  whom  he  has  a  son, 
Paul.  Emma  C.  is  the  wife  of  Samuel  Landis  and  has  one  daughter,  Ruth. 
Fred  0.,  a  plumber,  married  Christina  Esslinger.  Minnie  is  the  wife  of  L.  C. 
Good,  of  Dixon,  Illinois,  by  whom  she  has  a  daughter,  Bernice.  The  other 
members  of  the  family,  Albert,  Henry,  William,  Anna  and  Walter,  are  still 
under  the  parental  roof. 

The  parents  are  members  of  St.  John's  Lutheran  church,  while  Mr.  Loos 
is  a  member  of  the  Independent  Order  of  Odd  Fellows,  belonging  to  Lodge  No. 
174,  at  Sterling.  His  political  allegiance  is  given  to  the  republican  party  and 
he  served  for  one  term  as  a  member  of  the  city  council.  In  1873  he  erected 
a  nice  home  at  No.  805  West  Seventh  street,  which  he  has  occupied  to  the 
present  time.  His  enterprising  and  progressive  spirit  have  made  him  a 
typical  American  in  every  sense  of  the  word.  By  close  application  and  good 
business  judgment  he  has  raised  himself  to  the  position  which  he  now  holds 
in  the  business  world  and  he  commands  the  high  regard  of  all  with  whom  he 
is  brought  in  contact,  whether  in  a  business  or  social  relation. 


OLIVER  S.  OAKLEY. 

Oliver  S.  Oakley,  whose  span  of  life  covered  three  score  years  and  ten, 
was  born  near  Stockholm,  Sweden,  February  7,  1836,  and  died  October  13, 
1906."  His  parents  were  Swan  and  Christiana  (Jensen)  Oakley,  who  lived  and 
died  in  Sweden.  There  the  son  Oliver  was  reared  to  the  age  of  eighteen 
years,  when  he  crossed  the  Atlantic  to  the  new  world  and  came  to  Whiteside 
county  with  a  sister,  Mrs.  Mary  B.  Oakleaf.  The  tracks  of  the  Chicago  & 
Northwestern  Railroad  were  then  being  laid  and  he  was  employed  as  water 
boy  upon  the  road  between  Round  Grove  and  Morrison.  Desiring  to  secure  a 
more  advanced  education  than  had  been  afforded  in  his  native  country  and 
wishing  to  familiarize  himself  with  the  English  language,  he  attended  school 
"at  Garden  Plain  and  also  spent  some  time  as  a  student  in  the  college  at  Ful- 
ton. During  the  greater  part  of  his  life  he  followed  farming  and  entered  in- 
to active  connection  with  agricultural  interests  as  a  farm  hand,  being  thus 
employed  until  1862.  He  then  began  to  cultivate  a  rented  farm  and  in  1869 
went  to  Iowa,  where  he  remained  for  six  years,  making  his  home  in  Cedar 
county.  There  he  purchased  and  cultivated  a  good  farm  of  three  hundred 
and  twenty  acres  near  Tipton  until  the  spring  of  1875,  when  he  sold  his 
property  there  and  returned  to  Whiteside  county,  here  purchasing  an  exten- 
sive tract  of  rich  land. 

On  the  3d  of  January,  1865,  Mr.  Oakley  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss 
Jennie  Maxwell,  who  was  born  in  Scotland  in  1844  and  came  to  Whiteside 
county  with  an  uncle,  James  Cassel,  in  1856,  locating  in  Morrison.  He  owned 
a  farm  where  the  Center  schoolhouse  now  stands  and  his  niece,  Mrs.  Oakley, 


890  HISTORY    OF   WHITESIDE    COUNTY 

attended  the  Center  school  and  also  pursued  her  studies  in  Morrison.  Mr. 
Judd  was  her  first  teacher  and  the  schools  of  that  period  were  somewhat  prim- 
itive, but  the  pupils  were  thoroughly  grounded  in  the  elementary  branches  of 
English  learning.  Unto  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Oakley  were  born  five  children :  Alice 
M.,  the  wife  of  W.  G.  Garter,  of  Cohasset,  California,  by  whom  she  has  two 
sons  and  three  daughters;  Cora  A.,  who  has  engaged  in  teaching  for  several 
years  and  makes  her  home  with  her  mother;  Ida,  who  conducts  a  large  dress- 
making establishment  in  Cedar  Rapids,  Iowa ;  Lottie,  who  is  bookkeeper  for  the 
Morrison  Produce  Company;  and  Fred  S.,  who  is  operating  the  home  farm. 

On  his  return  to  Whiteside  county  in  1875  Mr.  Oakley  purchased  the 
James  Snyder  farm,  which  has  since  been  the  family  residence.  With  charac- 
teristic energy  he  began  its  further  development  and  improvement  and  in 
1901-2  erected  a  beautiful  residence,  which  stands  in  the  midst  of  well  kept 
fields  that  annually  bring  forth  rich  harvests.  The  other  equipments  of  the 
farm  are  also  modern  and  the  latest  improved  machinery  is  used  in  the  fields. 
Mr.  Oakley  was  always  progressive  as  well  as  practical  in  his  work  and  his 
labors  brought  to  him  a  gratifying  measure  of  success,  making  him  one  of  the 
representative  farmers  of  the  county..  He  continued  actively  in  his  work  un- 
til his  life's  labors  were  ended  in  death,  October  13,  1906.  His  loss  was  deeply 
regretted  by  many  friends,  for  he  was  widely  and  favorably  known  here.  He 
voted  with  the  republican  party  but  never  accepted  office.  He  served  for  a 
number  of  years  as  a  member  of  the  school  board  and  was  thus  officially  con- 
nected with  the  schools  at  the  time  of  his  demise.  When  a  young  man  he 
became  a  member  of  the  Odd  Fellows  Society  but  in  his  later  years  did  not 
sustain  active  relation  with  the  order.  His  Christian  faith  was  manifest  in  his 
membership  in  the  Lutheran  church  and  his  life  was  in  harmony  with  his 
professions.  Mrs.  Oakley  still  resides  upon  the  old  homestead  with  her  son, 
who  operates  the  farm,  and  the  family  is  well  known  in  the  community. 


DAVID  ANDERSON. 

There  is  no  citizen  of  Sterling  who  is  held  in  higher  regard  and  esteem 
than  David  Anderson,  who  since  1887  has  lived  retired  in  this  city,  occupying 
a  comfortable  home  at  No.  1609  East  Fourth  street.  He  is  a  native  of  Both- 
well,  Scotland,  his  birth  having  there  occurred  on  the  17th  of  March,  1829. 
Both  the  paternal  and  maternal  grandparents  were  natives  of  Scotland.  The 
paternal  grandfather,  James  Anderson,  wedded  a  Miss  Whitelaw  and  reared 
a  large  family.  He  was  a  farmer  by  occupation  and  died  when  well  advanced 
in  years.  The  maternal  grandfather,  James  Dick,  was  also  a  farmer.  He, 
too,  reared  a  large  family  and  lived  to  a  ripe  old  age,  but  his  wife  died  when  in 
middle  life. 

The  parents  of  our  subject,  James  and  Aellison  (Dick)  Anderson,  were 
likewise  natives  of  Bothwell,  Scotland.  Of  their  family  of  eight  children,  six 
sons  and  two  daughters,  David  of  this  review,  is  the  only  one  now  living. 
The  father  was  a  fanner  in  his  native  country,  and  in  1854,  believing  that  he 
might  better  provide  for  his  wife  and  family  in  America,  he  set  sail  for  the 


HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE   COUNTY  891 

United  States,  and  upon  his  arrival  on  American  shores  at  once  made  his  way 
to  Ogle  county,  Illinois,  settling  on  a  farm  in  Buffalo  township,  where  lived 
two  of  his  children,  who  had  preceded  him  to  this  country.  The  father  there 
spent  the  remainder  of  his  life,  passing  away  in  1861,  when  he  had  reached 
the  advanced  age  of  eighty  years.  His  wife  survived  him  for  twelve  years, 
when  she  passed  away,  having  reached  the  extreme  old  age  of  ninety-two 
years.  They  were  consistent  members  of  the  Presbyterian  church. 

David  Anderson,  whose  name  introduces  this  review,  was  reared  in  his 
native  country  and  there  acquired  his  education.  When  he  attained  his 
majority,  in  1850,  he  and  a  younger  brother,  Alexander  Anderson,  emi- 
grated to  the  new  world,  hoping  that  in  this  land  they  might  find  better  op- 
portunities than  could  be  enjoyed  in  Scotland.  Mr.  Anderson  at  once  made 
his  way  to  Ogle  county,  this  state,  and  purchased  one  hundred  and  sixty 
acres  of  land,  which  he  shared  with  his  brother.  Later  he  added  a  tract  of 
eighty  acres  to  his  original  purchase,  until  he  became  the  possessor  of  one 
hundred  and  sixty  acres  of  good  farming  property.  He  continued  to  culti- 
vate his  tract  of  land  until  1887,  when  he  retired  from  agricultural  pursuits 
and  removed  to  Sterling,  where  he  has  since  made  his  home,  occupying  a  fine 
brick  residence.  In  addition  to  this  he  also  retains  possession  of  his  farming 
property  and  owns  a  good  residence  property  in  Sterling,  located  at  the 
corner  of  Sixth  street  and  Thirteenth  avenue,  from  which  he  derives  a  good 
rental. 

Mr.  Anderson  chose  as  a  companion  and  helpmate  on  life's  journey,  Miss 
Ellen  Wilber,  to  whom  he  was  married  on  the  29th  of  March,  1855.  Mrs. 
Anderson  is  a  daughter  of  Tillinghest  and  Elmira  (Underwood)  Wilber,  na- 
tives of  Rhode  Island  and  Massachusetts,  respectively.  They  emigrated  from 
the  east  to  Illinois  in  1848,  establishing  their  home  in  Buffalo  Grove,  Ogle 
county,  where  the  father  engaged  in  farming.  Both  the  parents  are  now 
deceased,  having  passed  away  at  Polo,  this  state,  the  father  when  he  had 
reached  the  very  advanced  age  of  eighty-four  years,  while  the  mother  was  one 
year  his  junior  at  the  time  of  her  demise.  Their  family  numbered  two 
daughters  and  one  sou:  Emily,  the  widow  of  John  Wood,  of  Lanark,  Illi- 
nois; William  R.,-  of  Ashland,  Nebraska;  and  Ellen,  now  Mrs.  Anderson. 
The  paternal  grandfather  of  Mrs.  Anderson  was  John  Wilber,  a  native  of 
Rhode  Island  and  a  cooper  by  trade.  He  became  separated  from  his  parents 
during  the  Revolutionary  war,  in  which  his  father,  who  also  bore  the  name 
of  John  Wilber,  served  as  a  soldier.  John  Wilber,  Jr.,  wedded  Polly  Braham, 
and  they  settled  at  Buffalo  Grove  in  1845,  where  they  spent  their  remaining 
days,  the  former  passing  away  at  the  advanced  age  of  ninety-two  years,  while 
the  latter  died  at  the  age  of  seventy-seven.  The  maternal  grandparents  of 
Mrs.  Anderson  were  Jonas  and  Mary  Ann  (Pine)  Underwood,  the  former  a 
native  of  Massachusetts  and  a  soldier  of  the  Revolutionary  war.  Following 
the  close  of  hostilities  he  engaged  in  farming  in  Broome  county,  New  York, 
•where  both  passed  away  at  a  ripe  old  age.  They  reared  a  family  of  ten 
children. 

The  marriage  of  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Anderson  has  been  blessed  with  one  son, 
Raynold  B.  Anderson,  who  wedded  Miss  Agnes  Maxwell,  and  follows  farm- 


892  HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY 

ing  in  Newsong  township,  Ogle  county,  Illinois.  Mr.  Anderson  gives  his 
political  support  to  the  republican  party,  and  his  wife  is  a  member  of  the 
United  Brethren  church.  He  finds  his  greatest  social  enjoyment  at  his  own 
fireside,  where  his  wife  and  intimate  friends  know  him  to  be  a  delightful  com- 
panion. He  has  now  passed  the  seventy-ninth  milestone  on  life's  journey, 
and  the  rest  which  he  is  enjoying  is  well  merited.  His  residence  in  Sterling 
covers  more  than  two  decades,  and  therefore  few  men  have  more  intimate 
knowledge  of  its  history  or  of  events  which  have  left  their  impress  upon  its 
annals. 


JOHN  PAPE. 

John  Pape,  who  for  almost  a  quarter  of  a  century  was  numbered  among 
the  successful  and  representative  farmers  of  Ustick  township,  was  born  in 
England  on  the  30th  of  September,  1828,  and  died  in  1874.  Having  spent 
the  days  of  his  boyhood  and  youth  in  the  land  of  his  nativity,  he  determined 
to  come  to  America  in  the  hope  of  enjoying  better  business  opportunities  than 
were  afforded  in  the  old  world.  Accordingly  he  crossed  the  Atlantic  and  took 
up  his  abode  in  Carroll  county,  Illinois,  where  he  lived  for  five  years.  In 
1850  he  removed  to  Whiteside  county  and  secured  a  farm  of  eighty  acres  in 
Ustick  township.  It  was  largely  wild  and  unimproved,  but  he  at  once  began 
its  further  development  and  cultivation,  and  as  the  years  passed  he  con- 
verted the  place  into  an  excellent  farm.  There  he  made  his  home  until  hio 
death.  He  had  one  brother,  George  Pape,  who,  coming  to  America,  lived  for 
a  considerable  period  in  Carroll  county,  but  is  now  deceased. 

On  the  6th  of  December,  1860,  John  Pape  was  united  in  marriage  to 
Miss  Melvina  Green,  the  wedding  being  celebrated  in  Ustick  township.  She 
still  survives  her  husband  and  occupies  the  home  which  he  built  for  her.  Her 
parents  were  Jonathan  and  Susan  Green,  natives  of  Pennsylvania  who,  emi- 
grating westward,  located  in  Carroll  county,  Illinois,  where  they  lived  until 
their  death.  They  were  the  parents  of  four  children :  Mrs.  Lucretia  Hoover, 
now  a  resident  of  Mount  Vernon,  Ohio ;  Mrs.  Emily  Hate,  of  Winfield,  Iowa ; 
Jonathan,  who  was  formerly  engaged  in  the  paint  business,  but  is  now  living 
retired  in  Pasadena,  California;  and  Mrs.  Pape. 

Unto  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Pape  six  children  were  born.  Mary,  who  was  born 
March  12,  1862,  is  now  the  wife  of  Samuel  J.  Hawk,  of  Fulton,  and  they 
have  five  children,  Laura,  Edna,  George,  Clarence  and  Roy.  Jane  is  the 
wife  of  William  S.  Mitchell,  a  farmer,  and  they  have  five  children,  Bert, 
Maude,  Alice,  Minnie  and  Cecil.  Noah,  born  December  26,  1863,  married 
Miss  Date  Dyson  and  they  have  six  children,  Floyd;  Cloy,  who  lives  with 
his  grandmother,  Mrs.  Pape;  Blanch;  Lee;  Leapha;  and  Zelma.  George, 
born  April  2,  1868,  married  Lizzie  Peterkin  and  they  have  four  children, 
Lloyd,  Lyle,  Forrest  and  Frances.  Minnie,  born  December  27,  1871,  is 
the  wife  of  Frank  Milne,  of  Clyde  township,  and  they  have  six  children, 
Winnie,  Ruby,  Maud,  Sidney,  Verna  and  Harold.  John,  born  January  26, 
1875,  married  Rose  McKee,  and  resides  upon  the  home  farm. 


HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY  893 

The  death  of  the  husband  and  father  occurred  in  1874,  when  he  had 
been  a  resident  of  the  county  for  twenty-four  years.  He  was  a  member  of 
the  Masonic  lodge  and  chapter  and  was  an  exemplary  representative  of  the 
craft.  His  political  allegiance  was  given  to  the  republican  party  and  he  filled 
the  offices  of  township  assessor  and  collector.  Although  many  years  have 
passed  since  he  was  called  from  this  life  he  is  yet  remembered  by  many 
of  the  old  settlers  as  a  man  who  was  worthy  their  confidence  and  regard  and 
who  gained  their  lasting  friendship. 

Mrs.  Pape  still  owns  eighty  acres  of  land  which  her  son  Noah  now 
cultivates.  Since  the  time  of  her  marriage  she  has  resided  continuously  in 
Ustick  township  and  has  a  circle  of  friends  almost  coextensive  with  the  circle 
of  her  acquaintance.  She  belongs  to  the  Eastern  Star  .and  is  in  entire  sym- 
pathy with  the  work  of  the  order,  which  is  to  promote  mutual  helpfulness 
and  kindliness. 


CHARLES  EARL  WETHERBEE. 

In  the  history  of  the  county's  business  development  and  activity  mention 
should  be  made  of  Charles  Earl  Wetherbee,  one  of  the  native  sons,  who  by 
force  of  his  character,  his  enterprise  and  his  training  in  the  line  of  his  chosen 
calling  has  gained  success  and  a  position  of  distinction  as  an  architect.  He 
was  born  on  his  father's  farm  in  Sterling  township,  east  of  the  city,  May  1, 
1875.  His  paternal  grandfather,  Luther  B.  Wetherbee,  was  a  native  of 
Massachusetts  and  was  a  pattern-maker  in  the  east.  After  removing  west- 
ward to  Whiteside  county  he  secured  land  and  followed  farming,  taking  up 
two  hundred  acres  from  the  government,  which  he  brought  under  a  high 
state  of  cultivation.  Upon  that  place  he  reared  his  family  and  made  it  his 
home  until  his  death,  which  occurred  in  1874,  when  he  had  attained  an  ad- 
vanced age.  His  wife  passed  away  in  1878.  They  were  the  parents  of  four 
children,  of  whom  three  are  yet  living:  Charles  Adams;  Edwin  C.,  of 
Marshalltown,  Iowa;  and  Ada,  the  wife  of  Henry  0.  Gaston,  of  Cerro  Gordo, 
Illinois.  One  daughter  died  in  early  childhood. 

The  eldest  of  this  family  and  the  father  of  our  subject  was  a  native  of 
Massachusetts,  and  throughout  his  entire  life  has  been  a  farmer.  During 
the  early  epoch  in  the  settlement  of  this  county  he  came  west  with  his  par- 
ents, and  the  farm  upon  which  he  now  resides  was  that  which  his  father 
entered  as  a  claim  from  the  government.  Upon  that  place  he  was  reared  to 
manhood,  and  has  always  made  the  farm  his  home  with  the  exception  of  one 
or  two  years.  He  married  Miss  Margaret  Lavinia  Penrose,  a  native  of  Ohio, 
and  a  daughter  of  Marcus  Penrose,  who  was  likewise  born  in  the  Buckeye 
state,  and  was  a  farmer  by  occupation.  He  also  came  to  Whiteside  county 
at  an  early  day  and  settled  on  a  farm  north  of  Sterling,  where  he  lived  until 
he  had  attained  an  advanced  age,  when  he  took  up  his  abode  in  the  city, 
there  spending  his  remaining  days.  His  wife  died  when  in  middle  life.  They 
were  the  parents  of  six  children,  and  after  losing  his  first  wife  Mr.  Penrose  mar- 


894  HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY 

ried  again,  his  second  union  being  with  Lydia^  Kirk.  It  was  his  daughter, 
Margaret  Lavinia,  who  became  the  wife  of  Charles  Adams  Wetherbee.  They 
are  members  of  the  Congregational  church  and  are  highly  esteemed  in  the 
locality  where  they  reside.  Mr.  Wetherbee  is  a  veteran  of  the  Civil  war, 
having  served  for  three  years  with  the  Thirty-fourth  Illinois  Volunteer  In- 
fantry. He  joined  the  army  as  a  private  soldier  and  faithfully  defended  the 
old  flag.  After  his  return  from  the  south  he  resumed  farming,  and  is  now 
one  of  the  oldest  living  residents  of  the  county.  He  has  taken  an  active  part 
in  its  public  interests  as  well  as  its  agricultural  development,  and  was  road 
commissioner  and  supervisor  for  many  years.  He  also  served  for  one  term 
in  the  Illinois  legislature.  Unto  him  and  his  wife  have  been  born  four  chil- 
dren :  M.ay  Penrose,  who  is  living  in  Sterling ;  Ella  Dora,  who  died  in  1904 : 
Harriet  Ada,  the  wife  of  Clarence  Johnson,  of  New  York  city;  and  Charles 
Earl. 

Mr.  Wetherbee,  of  this  review,  was  reared  on  his  father's  farm,  and  at- 
tended the  district  school  in  his  boyhood  days,  while  later  he  continued  his 
education  in  the  Sterling  high  school  and  subsequently  in  the  Oberlin  Acad- 
emy and  in  the  Oberlin  College.  Three  years  were  devoted  to  his  college 
course,  after  which  he  matriculated  in  the  Illinois  State  University  at  Cham- 
paign and  mastered  a  four  years'  course.  He  studied  architecture  there  and 
after  leaving  the  university  entered  into  partnership  with  P.  T.  Van  Horn, 
of  Sterling.  The  partnership  continued  for  two  years,  after  which  Mr.  Weth- 
erbee purchased  Mr.  Van  Horn's  interest,  and  has  since  conducted  the  busi- 
ness alone.  As  an  architect  he  has  planned  a  number  of  the  principal  build- 
ings of  Sterling,  and  has  thus  contributed  to  the  adornment  of  the  city. 

On  the  28th  of  July,  1905,  Mr.  Wetherbee  was  married  to  Miss  Faith 
Leland  Bardwell,  a  daughter  of  John  and  Lovilla  (Kellogg)  Bardwell.  Mr. 
and  Mrs.  Wetherbee  are  members  of  the  Congregational  church,  and  he  be- 
longs to  Rock  River  Lodge,  No.  612,  A.  F.  &  A.  M.,  while  his  political  alle- 
giance is  given  to  the  republican  party.  He  resides  at  No.  716  East  Seventh 
street,  having  purchased  the  residence  there  built  by  Colonel  Wilson.  It  is  a 
beautiful  property,  and  the  spirit  of  hospitality  there  reigns  supreme.  Mr. 
Wetherbee  is  well  known  as  a  representative  of  one  of  the  old  and  prominent 
pioneer  families,  and  his  worth  is  widely  recognized  in  business  and  social 
circles. 


HON.  ALFRED  N.  ABBOTT. 

The  life  record  of  Hon.  Alfred  N.  Abbott  has  left  an  indelible  impress 
upon  the  history  of  Whiteside  county  and  his  many  friends  would  not  con- 
sider this  record  complete  were  there  failure  to  make  prominent  reference  to 
him.  He  has  achieved  gratifying  success  in  the  business  world  and  at  the 
same  time  has  been  actively  concerned  in  affairs  of  public  moment,  his  labors 
always  being  prompted  by  a  spirit  of  unquestioned  devotion  to  the  public 
good.  He  resides  upon  a  farm  in  Ustick  township  on  section  32,  which  was 


ASA  M.  ABBOTT 


LIBRARY 

OF  TH€ 

UNIVERSITY  OF  ILLINOIS 


HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY  897 

the  place  of  his  birth,  his  natal  day  being  November  2,  1862.  His  father 
entered  the  land  from  the  government  during  the  pioneer  epoch  in  the 
history  of  the  county,  and  from  the  days  when  Whiteside  was  upon  the 
frontier  until  the  present  the  name  of  Abbott  has  figured  conspicuously  and 
honorably  in  connection  with  the  development  and  progress  of  this  portion 
of  the  state. 

His  parents  were  Asa  M.  and  Sarah  (Sperry)  Abbott.  The  former 
was  born  in  Hartland,  Vermont,  November  16,  1820,  and  was  a  son  of 
Benjamin  and  Dorcas  (Noyes)  Abbott,  both  of  whom  were  natives  of  New 
Hampshire  and  of  English  lineage.  Benjamin  Abbott  was  born  in  Con- 
cord, and  was  the  fifth  in  direct  line  in  the  Abbott  family  to  bear  the  name 
of  Benjamin.  The  founder  of  the  Abbott  family  in  America  arrived  in 
1643  and  became  one  of  the  first  settlers  of  Andover,  Massachusetts.  On 
the  records  of  Revolutionary  soldiers  the  name  frequently  appears.  Ben- 
jamin Abbott,  the  great-grandfather  of  our  subject,  joined  the  patriot  army 
at  the  outbreak  of  hostilities  with  the  mother  country  and  was  wounded  in 
the  battle  of  Bunker  Hill.  Two  of  his  brothers  participated  in  the  battle  of 
Bennington,  in  which  one  of  them  was  killed.  Benjamin  Abbott,  the 
grandfather,  making  his  home  in  the  Green  Mountain  state,  there  reared  a 
family  of  six  children.  Ephraim,  who  was  a  printer  by  trade,  removed 
westward  to  St.  Louis  and  was  the  editor  of  the  first  agricultural  paper  pub- 
lished in  the  Mississippi  valley.  Enoch,  who  engaged  in  merchandising 
at  New  Hampshire,  traveled  around  the  world  for  his  health  and  spent  his 
last  days  in  Concord,  New  Hampshire,  which  town  was  founded  by  the 
Abbott  family.  Asa  was  the  next  in  order  of  'birth.  Laura  became  the  wife 
of  Lansing  Morton,  of  Mortons  Corners,  New  York,  and  died  at  the  age  of 
twenty-six  years.  Susan  became  the  wife  of  Jesse  Fry  and  died  leaving 
two  children.  Laura  married  Brigadier  General  William  Clendennin,  of 
Moline. 

Reared  in  the  state  of  his  nativity,  Asa  M.  Abbott  early  learned  and 
followed  the  gunsmith's  trade.  At  the  age  of  twenty-one  he  became  a  resi- 
dent of  St.  Louis,  Missouri,  and  in  1847  took  up  his  abode  at  Fulton,  Illi- 
nois, where  for  a  brief  period  he  worked  as  a  gunsmith.  The  following  year 
he  secured  a  claim  of  eighty  acres,  which  was  then  wild  and  unimproved, 
and  with  characteristic  energy  began  its  development.  In  his  farming 
operations  he  prospered  and,  adding  to  his  possessions,  became  the  owner  of 
four  hundred  and  eighty  acres  of  land  in  Kansas  and  three  hundred  and 
twenty  acres  in  Illinois,  including  a  valuable  timber  tract  of  one  hundred 
and  thirty  acres.  He  was  prominent  in  community  affairs  and  aided  largely 
in  molding  the  policy  and  shaping  the  destiny  of  the  county  during  its 
formative  period.  He  was  the  first  town  clerk  and  filled  a  number  of  the 
township  offices.  Fraternally  he  was  connected  with  the  Masons  and  with 
the  Odd  Fellows  and  served  as  noble  grand  in  the  latter  organization. 

At  Oquawka,  Illinois,  on  the  6th  of  December,  1846,  Asa  M.  Abbott 
married  Miss  Sarah  Sperry,  who  was  born  in  Mecca,  Ohio,  February  18, 
1822,  a  daughter  of  Joy  and  Mary  Sperry,  who  in  1830  traveled  across  the 
country  with  ox-teams  from  Ohio  to  Henderson  county,  Illinois.  Their 


898  HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY 

children  were:  John,  now  deceased;  Charles,  who  is  living  at  Nephi,  Utah; 
William ;  Harrison,  of  Salt  Lake  City ;  Aaron  and  Betsy,  deceased ;  and  Mary 
Anne,  who  married  Royes  Oatman,  and  who  with  her  husband  and  five 
children  were  killed  by  the  Indians  in  Arizona  in  1851  while  on  their  way 
to  California.  Unto  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Asa  M.  Abbott  were  born  seven  children. 
Charles  E.,  whose  birth  occurred  December  22,  1847,  married  Sarah  Sperry 
and  is  now  connected  with  street  railway  interests  in  Salt  Lake  City,  Utah. 
John  Morton,  born  March  25,  1850,  wedded  Hannah  E.  Knight  and  is  a 
resident  farmer  of  Marshall  county,  Kansas.  Ruth,  born  June  23,  1852, 
died  May  12,  1855.  Theodore  Sperry,  born  September  23,  1855,  and  now  a 
civil  engineer  of  Saltillo,  Mexico,  married  Lillian  Nalle,  a  native  of  Vir- 
ginia, who  died  August  6,  1902,  and  in  February,  1904,  he  wedded  Grace 
Ailing.  Edward  Lorenzo,  born  February  15,  1859,  and  now  a  civil  engineer 
of  New  York  city,  was  married  in  May,  1888,  to  Lillian  Hartwell.  William 
Lament,  born  February  14,  1861,  and  now  an  operating  engineer  with  the 
Edison  Commonwealth  Electric  Company  of  Chicago,  married  Caroline  Ent- 
whistle,  September  14,  1887.  Alfred  N.  completes  the  family.  The  father 
died  April  8,  1889,  and  -the  mother  passed  away  at  the  age  of  sixty-eight 
years. 

Alfred  N.  Abbott,  reared  upon  the  old  homestead  farm,  began  his  edu- 
cation as  a  district-school  student  when  about  six  years  of  age  and  supple- 
mented his  preliminary  mental  training  by  study  in  the  State  University 
at  Champaign,  where  three  of  his  brothers  had  also  been  students.  The 
occupation  to  which  he  was  reared  he  chose  as  a  life  work  and  has  long  been 
accounted  one  of  the  most  enterprising,  progressive  and  successful  agricul- 
turists of  the  community.  Since  his  father's  death  he  had  added  to  the 
place  a  tract  of  one  hundred  and  twenty  acres  and  is  now  the  owner  of  a 
valuable  farm  of  four  hundred  acres,  which  returns  to  him  a  gratifying 
annual  income  in  golden  harvests  that  result  from  the  care  and  labor  he 
bestows  upon  the  fields.  He  has  also  erected  substantial  modern  buildings 
and  everything  about  the  place  indicates  his  care  and  supervison  and  his 
excellent  executive  and  business  ability. 

On  the  12th  of  October,  1886,  was  celebrated  the  marriage  of  Alfred 
N.  Abbott  and  Miss  Sarah  Green,  who  was  born  in  Woodbine,  Jo  Daviess 
county,  Illinois,  April  3,  1865.  Her  father,  John  H.  Green,  now  a  retired 
farmer,  was  born  June  29,  1831,  in  Yorkshire,  England,  and  came  to  Amer- 
ica in  1842.  He  afterward  worked  in  the  lead  mines  near  Galena  until  he 
attained  his  majority,  when  in  1852  he  went  to  the  gold  fields  of  California, 
where  he  remained  for  six  years.  He  then  returned  to  Illinois  and  settled  at 
Woodbine  in  Jo  Daviess  county,  where  he  remained  until  March,  1869, 
when  he  took  up  his  abode  in  Whiteside  county.  Here  he  conducted  busi- 
ness as  an  active  and  prosperous  farmer  until  1894,  when  he  retired  to  Mor- 
rison to  enjoy  in  well  earned  rest  the  fruits  of  his  former  toil.  On  the  1st 
of  December,  1860,  he  was  married  to  Miss  Margaret  Lowry,  who  was  born 
on  the  Isle  of  Man,  September  17,  1844,  and  on  coming  to  the  United  States 
located  at  Elizabeth,  Illinois.  Unto  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Green  were  born  six 
children :  John  G.,  born  in  Woodbine,  August  25,  1862,  and  now  a  resident 


HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY  899 

farmer  of  Ustick  township,  married  Lydia  Steiner  and  has  five  children. 
Mrs.  Abbott  is  the  second  of  the  family.  May,  born  November  29,  1873, 
in  this  county,  is  the  wife  of  B.  F.  Hoover,  a  resident  farmer  of  Lyndon 
township,  and  has  two  children.  Phoebe,  born  March  19,  1876,  is  with  her 
parents  in  Morrison.  Daniel  died  in  infancy.  Benjamin,  born  August  22, 
1887,  is  also  at  home. 

The  marriage  of  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Abbott  was  blessed  with  four  children: 
Bayard  Taylor,  born  November  5,  1887,  and  Frances  Dorcas,  born  January 
5,  1889,  are  now  members  of  the  sophomore  class  of  the  Illinois  University 
at  Champaign.  Louis  Asa,  born  August  9,  1891,  is  a  high  school  student  in 
Morrison;  and  Howard  Green,  born  January  8,  1896,  is  attending  district 
school. 

The  family  is  prominent  socially,  the  members  of  the  household  occupy- 
ing an  enviable  position  in  the  regard  of  their  associates.  Mr.  Abbott  be- 
longs to  the  Masonic  and  Odd  Fellows  fraternities  and  he  and  his  wife  are 
connected  with  the  Eastern  Star.  He  likewise  holds  membership  with  Ustick 
Camp,  No.  3995,  M.  W.  A.,  and  with  the  Mystic  Workers.  His  political 
allegiance  is  given  to  the  republican  party  and  he  has  long  been  recognized 
as  one  of  its  leaders  in  Whiteside  county.  He  is  in  thorough  sympathy  with 
its  principles  and  its  policy  and  has  been  almost  continuously  in  public 
office  since  attaining  his  majority.  He  was  only  twenty-one  years  of  age 
when  elected  justice  of  the  peace,  in  which  position  he  was  continued  by 
re-election  for  six  years.  For  one  term  he  served  as  supervisor  and  in  Novem- 
ber, 1898,  resigned  that  position  to  enter  upon  the  duties  of  representative 
of  his  district  in  the  state  legislature,  to  which  he  had  been  called  by  popular 
vote.  While  a  member  of  the  house  he  gave  careful  consideration  to  each 
question  which  came  up  for  settlement  and  his  official  record  has  at  all 
times  been  characterized  by  a  fidelity  to  duty  that  is  above  question.  He  is 
respected  and  honored  wherever  known  and  most  of  all  where  best  known. 
His  entire  life  has  been  passed  in  Whiteside  county  upon  the  farm  where  he 
yet  resides  and  his  sterling  traits  of  character  have  made  him  a  man  of  many 
friends. 


FRANKLIN   A.    UPTON. 

In  the  death  of  Franklin  A.  Upton  on  the  30th  of  August,  1886.  White- 
side  county  mourned  the  loss  of  one  of  its  native  sons,  who  by  his  sterling 
traits  of  character  had  gained  the  confidence  and  respect  of  many  friends. 
He  was  an  enterprising  farmer  living  on  section  23,  Mount  Pleasant  township, 
and  his  birth  occurred  in  Lyndon  township  on  the  27th  of  April,  1854,  his 
parents  being  Eli  and  Elizabeth  Ann  (Ncwcomb)  Upton.  His  father,  who 
was  an  honored  pioneer  of  Whiteside  county,  and  one  of  its  most  prosperous 
farmers,  was  born  in  Peter?boro,  Hillsboro  county,  New  Hampshire,  Septem- 
ber 28,  1811,  a  son  of  Eli  and  Abigail  (Snow)  Upton,  who  were  likewise 
natives  of  that  state,  where  the  father  owned  and  conducted  a  grist  mill 


900  HISTORY   OF   WHITESIDE    COUNTY 

for  many  years.  He  spent  the  last  eight  years  of  his  life  in  the  home  of  his 
son  Eli  and  died  at  the  age  of  eighty-five  years,  having  long  survived  his  first 
wife,  who  died  at  the  age  of  thirty.  Following  her  demise  he  afterward 
married  again. 

Eli  Upton  was  reared  in  New  Hampshire  and  in  early  manhood  learned 
the  machinist's  trade,  which  he  followed  for  three  years.  He  was  after- 
ward  employed  as  a  -machinist  in  a  woolen  and  cotton  mill  for  two  years 
and  then  went  to  Yenego,  in  the  state  of  Sonora,  Mexico,  with  Charles  Peck, 
to  set  up  and  put  in  operation  the  machinery  for  a  cotton  mill  to  be  built  at 
that  place.  For  nearly  four  years  Mr.  Upton  remained  in  Mexico  and  in 
1844  returned  to  the  United  States.  After  reaching  his  old  home,  he  was 
there  married,  in  June,  1844,  to  Elizabeth  Ann,  daughter  of  John  New- 
comb,  of  New  Hampshire.  Soon  afterward  the  young  couple  started  by 
way  of  the  lakes  for  Illinois,  reaching  Chicago  when  it  was  a  small  and 
unimportant  town.  There  he  purchased  a  team  and  wagon  and  some  house- 
hold utensils  and  continued  on  his  journey  to  Whiteside  county.  For  ten 
years  he  resided  on  a  farm  of  one  hundred  and  eighty-five  acres  on  section  6, 
Lyndon  township,  and  then  removed  to  Mount  Pleasant  township.  At  one 
time  he  owned  about  a  thousand  acres  of  land.  He  improved  and  operated 
a  large  farm  and  was  one  of  the  most  extensive  stock  farmers  of  that  day. 
In  all  of  his  business  affairs  he  displayed  an  aptitude  for  successful  manage- 
ment and  in  connection  with  his  son  George  he  dealt  successfully  in  Perch- 
eron  horses  for  twelve  years  but  gave  up  business  in  order  to  live  retired 
in  the  enjoyment  of  the  fruits  of  his  former  labor.  He  reached  the  very 
venerable  age  of  eighty-nine  years,  passing  away  in  1900,  while  his  wife 
died  June  9,  1890,  at  the  age  of  sixty-eight  years.  They  were  the  parents 
of  four  children  who  reached  adult  age,  while  a  daughter,  Susan,  died  at 
the  age  of  fifteen  months.  George  Y.  is  now  a  retired  farmer  of  LaGrange, 
Illinois,  and  still  owns  land  in  Mount  Pleasant  township.  At  the  time  of 
the  Civil  war  he  served  for  eighteen  months  in  the  Union  army.  John  Eli 
wedded  Mary  Galbraith  and  resided  on  a  farm  in  Mount  Pleasant  town- 
ship but  died  in  1877,  leaving  three  children.  Joseph  Snow,  who  married 
Augusta  Rockwell,  is  now  a  farmer  of  Harwood,  North  Dakota. 

Franklin  A.  Upton  was  reared  under  the  parental  roof  and  speirt  his 
entire  life  in  this  county.  His  preliminary  education  was  supplemented  by 
study  in  the  Morrison  high  school  and  after  putting  aside  his  text-books  he 
learned  the  tinsmith's  trade,  which  he  followed  for  a  few  years.  His  time 
and  energies,  however,  were  largely  given  to  general  farming  and  stock- 
raising.  He  was  successful  in  this  work  by  reason  of  his  unfaltering  dili- 
gence and  keen  discrimination  and  in  all  of  his  business  dealings  was  known 
to  be  fair,  reliable  and  trustworthy. 

Mr.  Upton  was  married  to  Miss  Ellen  J.  Puddifoot,  who  was  born  in 
Ustick  township,  this  county,  'a  daughter  of  Alfred  and  Lucy  (Tooley) 
Puddifoot,  who  came  here  in  1855  from  London,  England,  where  they  were 
married.  They  established  their  home  in  Ustick  township  and  after  living 
there  for  some  time  the  father  purchased  a  farm  in  Clyde  township,  where 
he  capably  and  successfully  carried  on  general  agricultural  pursuits  until 


HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY  901 

he  retired  with  a  handsome  competence  and  removed  to  Morrison,  where 
he  still  resides.  He  is  an  energetic,  alert  and  prosperous  business  man  and 
a  most  highly  respected  citizen,  and  throughout  the  community  has  many 
warm  friends.  His  wife  died  in  1892,  at  the  age  of  sixty-four  years.  She 
was  a  lady  of  many  excellent  traits  of  heart  and  mind  and  many  friends 
keenly  felt  her  loss.  In  their  family  were  eight  children,  of  whom  six  are 
yet  living:  Mary  Ann,  who  was  born  in  England  and  died  in  Clyde  town- 
ship in  1879;  Lizzie,  the  wife  of  George  S.  Peet,  a  resident  of  New  Haven, 
Connecticut;  Mrs.  Ellen  J.  Upton,  of  this  review;  Albert,  who  is  living  in 
Morrison ;  Amelia,  the  wife  of  Fred  J.  Richardson,  who  resides  in  Mor- 
rison; Charles  H.,  a  commercial  traveler,  whose  home  is  in  St.  Joseph, 
Missouri;  Jesse,  who  is  engaged  in  the  hotel  business  in  Ward,  Colorado; 
and  Ida  May,  who  died  in  infancy. 

Unto  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Upton  were  born  four  children,  all  natives  of  White- 
side  county.  Clifford  J.,  born  November  6,  1878,  is  now  a  roll  turner  for 
the  Lackawanna  Steel  Company,  at  Buffalo,  New  York.  He  married  Fannie 
Holngren,  of  Chicago.  William  A.,  born  May  4,  1880,  and  now  connected 
with  mining  interests  at  Ward,  Colorado,  married  Bessie  Nichols,  of  Chicago. 
Eli  L.,  born  February  24,  1882,  married  Florence  L.  Wells,  of  Chicago,  and 
resides  in  that  city,  being  employed  in  the  plate  mill  of  the  Illinois  Steel 
Company.  Mabel  B.,  born  January  6,  1886,  is  the  wife  of  R.  W.  Suther- 
land, of  Ward,  Colorado. 

Franklin  A.  Upton  was  a  democrat  in  his  political  views  and  always 
kept  well  informed  on  the  questions  and  issues  of  the  day  but  was  never 
an  office  seeker.  He  belonged  to  the  Odd  Fellows  society  and  was  greatly 
esteemed  by  his  brethren  of  that  organization.  His  upright,  honorable  life 
made  him  a  worthy  representative  of  a  prominent  pioneer  family  and  his 
many  commendable  traits  of  character  gained  him  a  high  position  in  the 
esteem  of  those  with  whom  he  was  associated.  Following  her  husband's 
death  Mrs.  Upton  carefully  reared  her  family  and  resided  in  Whiteside 
county  until  1894,  when  she  removed  to  Chicago,  where  she  now  makes 
her  'home.  However,  she  still  owns  property  in  Mount  Pleasant  township 
and  numbers  many  friends  among  her  acquaintances  in  this  part  of  the 
state. 


DAVID  HYDE. 

David  Hyde,  enjoying  well  earned  rest  in  the  evening  of  life,  was  in 
former  years  connected  with  agricultural  pursuits  in  Hopkins  township,  but 
is  now  living  retired  in  Como.  He  has  passed  the  eighty-eighth  milestone  on 
life's  journey,  his  birth  having  occurred  in  Lancaster  county,  Pennsylvania, 
November  7,  1819.  His  parents  were  David  and  Barbara  (Stoner)  Hyde, 
who  were  likewise  natives  of  Lancaster  county,  where  they  spent  their  entire 
lives.  The  maternal  grandfather,  David  Stoner,  a  native  of  Germany,  on 
emigrating  from  that  country,  crossed  the  Atlantic  to  the  new  world  and  be- 


902  HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY 

came  the  founder  of  the  family  in  Lancaster  county.  He  married  a  Miss 
Herr,  who  was  a  native  of  Pennsylvania.  The  family  is  noted  for  longevity, 
many  of  the  members  reaching  advanced  age.  The  father,  David  Hyde, 
was  a  soldier  of  the  war  of  1812.  In  the  east  he  followed  farming,  and  there 
reared  his  family  of  twelve  children,  namely :  Mary,  Elizabeth,  Lucy,  John, 
Henry,  Adam,  David,  William,  Catherine,  Susan,  Christine  and  Katherine. 
But  two  of  the  number  now  survive,  Susan  and  David. 

The  latter  was  about  fifteen  years  of  age  when  he  started  in  life  on  his 
own  account.  He  had  up  to  that  time  remained  with  his  parents,  but  now  he 
began  work  as  a  farm  hand  and  was  employed  by  others  until  eighteen  years 
of  age.  He  then  turned  his  attention  to  the  milling  business,  which  he 
learned  in  Huntingdon  county,  Pennsylvania.  He  served  a  three  years'  ap- 
prenticeship and  afterward  worked  at  the  same  place  as  a  journeyman  for 
about  five  years  more.  Thus  his  time  was  busily  occupied,  and  he  learned 
the  value  of  industry  and  unfaltering  diligence. 

On  the  24th  of  August,  1843,  Mr.  Hyde  was  married  to  Miss  Anna  Difen- 
bauch,  a  daughter  of  Henry  and  Mary  (Bressler)  Difenbauch,  who  were  na- 
tives of  Lancaster  county,  Pennsylvania,  where  they  lived  and  died.  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  Hyde  came  to  Sterling  in  1855,  after  residing  for  twelve  years-  in  the 
east,  and  settled  near  the  city.  For  many  years  Mr.  Hyde  followed  farming 
for  George  Hoover,  and  in  1893  purchased  a  farm  in  Hopkins  township — the 
old  Loomis  place,  which  he  owned  and  cultivated  for  ten  years,  bringing  the 
fields  under  a  high  state  of  improvement.  He  sold  that  property  in  1903, 
and  has  since  lived  in  Como,  enjoying  a  rest  which  he  has  truly  earned  and 
richly  merits.  He  is  a  wonderfully  well  preserved  man  for  one  of  his  age, 
the  years  resting  lightly  upon  him.  He  has  here  a  few  acres  of  land  which  ho 
cultivates,  working  every  day,  and  in  the  winter  time  hauls  large  loads  of 
wood,  which  he  cuts  and  splits  for  fuel.  There  are,  indeed,  few  who  reach 
his  age  who  possess  so  much  vigor  and  ambition. 

Unto  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Hyde  have  been  born  three  children  who  are  now 
living:  Samuel,  a  resident  of  Sterling;  Louise,  who  is  the  widow  of  John 
Reese,  and  resides  in  Pontiac,  Illinois;  and  Libby,  the  wife  of  the  Rev.  John 
Van  Avery,  who  is  living  near  Pontiac. 

Mr.  Hyde  cast  his  first  vote  for  General  Harrison,  and  also  voted  for 
Henry  Clay.  He  has  since  voted  at  every  presidential  election  with  one  ex- 
ception, and  has  been  unfaltering  on  his  support  of  the  political  principles 
which  he  has  deemed  would  prove  of  the  greatest  benefit  to  the  country.  He 
was  born  during  the  presidential  administration  of  James  Monroe,  and  has 
lived  through  a  most  momentous  period  in  the  history  of  the  country.  Even 
in  the  east  hardly  a  railroad  had  been  built,  and  the  steamboat  was  yet  an  ex- 
periment. Mr.  Hyde  saw  the  first  railroad  in  the  United  States,  the  road 
being  built  of  wooden  rails  covered  with  strap  iron.  He  remembers  seeing 
the  first  two  railroad  engines  called  the  Johnny  Bull  and  Firefly.  A  notable 
event  in  his  life  was  his  meeting  with  General  La  Fayette,  upon  his  return  to 
this  country.  He  has  lived  to  see  the  country  crossed  and  recrossed  with  the 
great  network  of  railroads,  has  seen  the  introduction  of  the  telegraph  and  the 
telephone,  the  automobile  and  the  improved  machinery  which  has  entirely 


HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY  903 

revolutionized  the  methods  of  farming  since  his  boyhood  days.  In  his  early 
life  fanning  was  practically  carried  011  as  it  had  been  through  centuries,  and 
there  has  been  greater  change  in  the  work  of  developing  the  soil  and  caring 
for  the  crops  than  in  perhaps  any  other  line  of  life.  Mr.  Hyde  has  always 
kept  apace  with  the  general  progress  and  has  rejoiced  in  what  has  been  ac- 
complished. He  and  his  wife  have  traveled  life's  journey  together  for  nearly 
*ixty-three  years,  in  sunshine  and  storm,  amid  all  the  changing  events  of 
their  lives,  sharing  their  joys  and  sorrows,  and  now,  with  the  sun  far  down 
the  western  slope,  their  lives  are  tranquil  and  serene,  and  all  who  know 
them  hold  them  in  highest  esteem.  During  the  years  of  their  residence  in 
Whiteside  county  they  have  won  lasting  friendships  and  their  memory  will  be 
cherished  long  after  they  have  passed  away.  They  are  both  members  of  the 
Presbyterian  church  at  Sterling,  and  have  lived  in  harmony  with  their  pro- 
fessions in  the  Christian -faith. 


HENRY   GEORGE   KOHL. 

The  spirit  of  enterprise  and  close  application  which  are  the  salient 
features  in  the  successful  business  career  are  manifest  in  Mr.  Kohl,  who 
is  conducting  a  barber  shop  on  East  Third  street  in  Sterling.  This  is  his 
native  city,  his  birth  having  here  occurred  July  27,  1879.  His  parents 
were  Herman  and  Sophia  (Winckus)  Kohl,  natives  of  Diisseldorf,  Germany. 
The  father  was  a  cooper  by  trade  and  in  1869  came  to  America,  settling  in 
Sterling,  where  he  followed  coopering  for  many  years.  He  afterward  worked 
in  a  distillery  for  several  years  and  since  that  time  he  has  lived  retired. 
He  has  now  reached  the  age  of  eighty  years,  while  his  wife  is  seventy  years 
of  age.  Both  are  members  of  the  Roman  Catholic  church.  Their  family 
numbered  ten  children,  seven  sons  and  three  daughters:  Joe;  Frank;  John; 
Adam;  Gertrude,  the  wife  of  D.  P.  Crook;  Matthew;  Peter;  Isabel,  the  wife 
of  Frank  Boehm;  Rose,  the  wife  of  C.  E.  Derwent;  and  Henry  George, 
of  this  review. 

In  taking  up  the  personal  history  of  Mr.  Kohl,  whose  name  introduces 
this  record,  we  present  to  our  readers  the  life  of  one  who  is  widely  and 
favorably  known  in  Sterling,  where  he  was  reared.  He  attended  the  public 
schools  and  also  the  Sacred  Heart  parochial  school  and  after  putting  aside 
his  text-books  he  began  learning  the  barber's  trade.  He  thoroughly  quali- 
fied for  that  work  and  in  June.  1901,  opened  a  shop  of  his  own.  He  now 
has  a  shop  with  fovr  chairs  at  No.  1  East  Third  .street  and  has  an  excellent 
patronage  from  among  the  best  people  of  Sterling  and  vicinity.  He  em- 
ploys capable,  courteous  workmen  and  is  meeting  with  gratifying  success  in 
his  undertakings. 

On  the  llth  of  July,  1906,  Mr.  Kohl  was  married  to  Miss  Tessie  M. 
Wetzell,  a  daughter  of  John  Henry  and  Kate  (Horlicker)  Wetzell.  They 
now  have  one  son,  Vincent  Henry.  Mr.  Kohl  is  a  member  of  the  Sacred 
Heart  Catholic  church  and  belongs  to  the  Knights  of  Columbus.  He  has 


904  HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY 

spent  his  entire  life  in  Sterling,  has  always  been  industrious  and  ambitious 
to  succeed  and  has  gained  a  gratifying  patronage  here.  In  character  devel- 
opment, too,  he  has  made  commendable  progress  and  enjoys  the  confidence 
and  high  esteem  of  those  who  know  him.  His  acquaintance  here  is  a  wide 
one,  as  Sterling  has  been  the  place  of  his  residence  throughout  his  entire 
life. 


SAMUEL  A.  SHARER. 

Samuel  A.  Sharer,  a  successful  agriculturist  and  stock-raiser,  residing  in 
Garden  Plain  township,  was  born  in  Center  county,  Pennsylvania,  May  15, 
1863,  a  son  of  Samuel  and  Magdalena  (Hoy)  Sharer,  likewise  natives  of  the 
Keystone  state.  The  grandparents  of  our  subject  emigrated  from  Germany 
to  America  at  a  very  early  day,  settling  in  Pennsylvania.  The  paternal 
grandfather,  Henry  Sharer,  reared  a  family  of  eight  children,  of  whom 
Samuel  Sharer,  the  father  of  our  subject,  was  the  only  one  who  ever  came 
west.  It  was  in  the  year  18'65  that  he  came  to  Whiteside  county,  Illinois, 
purchasing  one  hundred  acres  of  land,  at  forty  dollars  per  acre,  from  his 
father,  Henry  Sharer,  who  had  bought  the  tract  originally.  It  was  on  this 
farm  that  Samuel  Sharer,  Sr.,  principally  reared  his  family  and  carried  on 
agricultural  pursuits  throughout  his  active  business  life,  his  death  occurring 
April  25,  1892,  when  he  had  attained  the  age  of  sixty-three  years,  two  months 
and  eleven  days.  By  his  first  wife,  who  passed  away  January  30,  1889,  at  the 
age  of  fifty-nine  years,  five  months  and  four  days,  he  had  ten  children, 
namely:  Annie  M.,  the  wife  of  Philander  Ryersee,  of  Ness  county,  Kansas; 
Mary,  the  wife  of  Benjamin  Schisler;  John  H.,  of  Garden  Plain  township; 
David,  who  resides  in  Kansas;  Joseph  O.,  who  makes  his  home  in  Davenport, 
Iowa;  Minerva  J.,  the  wife  of  Richard  Schisler,  of  Harrisburg.  Oregon;  Elmer 
M.,  who  lives  in  Kansas;  Samuel  A.,  of  this  review;  Jeremiah  J.,  of  Abing- 
don,  Illinois;  and  Louella  A.,  the  wife  of  Frank  Huggins.  In  1891  the 
father  of  this  family  was  again  married,  his  second  union  being  with  Miss 
Elizabeth  Young,  of  Center  county,  Pennsylvania. 

Brought  to  Whiteside  county  when  but  two  and  a  half  years  of  age, 
Samuel  A.  Sharer  still  resides  on  the  farm  which  his  father  purchased  at 
that  early  day.  He  acquired  his  education  in  the  Cedar  Creek  schoolhou;-e, 
and  when  he  had  attained  his  majority  began  working  for  his  father  on  a 
salary.  In  1891  his  father  removed  to  Albany,  but  he  remained  on  the  old 
homestead  farm  and  has  lived  here  continuously  to  the  present  time,  being 
actively  and  successfully  engaged  in  its  cultivation  and  development.  He  has 
one  hundred  and  forty-five  acres  of  land,  has  ever  displayed  unremitting" 
industry  and  sound  business  judgment  in  the  conduct  of  his  farming  and 
stock-raising  interests  and  is  therefore  meeting  with  a  well-merited  measure 
of  prosperity. 

On  the  21st  of  October,  1903,  Mr.  Sharer  was  united  in  marriage  to 
Miss  Bertlia  P.  Starbuck,  a  native  of  Sutton,  West  Virginia,  and  a  daughter 


MR.  AND  MRS.  S.  A.  SHARER 


LIBRARY 

OF  THE 

UNIVERSITY  OF  ILLINOIS 


HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY  907 

of  B.  B.  and  Mary  E.  (Skidmore)  Starbuck,  also  natives  of  West  Virginia. 
The  Starbucks  came  from  England  and  located  in  Massachusetts,  thence 
removed  to  Indiana  and  subsequently  settled  in  West  Virginia,  in  which 
state  Mrs.  Sharer  was  reared  and  educated.  Unto  Mr.  and  Mrs.  B.  B.  Star- 
buck  were  born  four  children:  Alpheus  C.,  of  Sterling,  Illinois;  Mrs.  Sharer; 
Grover  C.,  of  Summersville,  West  Virginia;  and  Earl  B.  The  mother  of 
this  family  passed  away  July  14,  1890,  while  her  husband  survived  until 
March  7,  1901,  when  he,  too,  was  called  to  his  final  rest.  Since  1902  A.  C. 
Starbuck  has  resided  in  Sterling,  and  in  1906  Earl  B.  Starbuck  came  to 
Whiteside  county,  now  making  his  home  with  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Sharer.  The 
latter  are  the  parents  of  one  daughter,  Veda  Louise. 

Mr.  Sharer  usually  votes  with  the  democracy  and  fraternally  is  con- 
nected with  Albany  Lodge,  No.  566,  A.  F.  &  A.  M.,  and  Social  Chapter,  No. 
87,  0.  E.  S.,  with  which  his  wife  is  also  identified.  Having  resided  in  this 
county  throughout  almost  his  entire  life,  he  is  largely  familiar  with  the 
annals  of  this  part  of  the  state  from  pioneer  times  down  to  the  present  and 
in  the  work  of  development  and  progress  has  ever  borne  his  full  share. 


HENRY  B.   WILKINSON. 

Henry  B.  Wilkinson,  engaged  in  the  abstract  business  in  Morrison 
since  1883  and  a  member  of  the  firm  of  Wilkinson  &  Company  since  1901, 
was  born  in  Como,  Whiteside  county,  in  1849.  His  father,  Winfield  Scott 
Wilkinson,  was  a  native  of  Skaneateles.  New  York,  and  of  English  lineage. 
His  grandfather,  John  Wilkinson,  was  a.  soldier  of  the  Revolutionary  war. 
enlisting  with  the  'New  York  troops. 

W.  S.  Wilkinson  was  a  civil  engineer  who  pursued  his  education  at 
Georgetown,  Kentucky,  and  was  graduated  on  completing  a  classical  course. 
He  came  to  Illinois  about  1838,  settling  first  in  Jacksonville,  where  he 
engaged  in  hi?  profession.  While  a  resident  of  that  .city  he  was 'chosen  to 
represent  his  district  in  the  Illinois  legislature.  About  1840  he  arrived  in 
Whiteside  county,  taking  up  his  abode  at  Como,  where  he  continued  to  en- 
gage in  surveying  and  civil  engineering.  There  he  remained  until  1856, 
when  he  was  elected  county  clerk  and  then  removed  to  Sterling,  the  county 
seat.  He  was  an  incumbent  in  this  office  for  twelve  years,  being  first  elected 
on  the  democratic  ticket  and  reelected  on  the  non-partisan  ticket.  He  proved 
a,  most  acceptable  officer,  retiring  from  the  position  as  he  had  entered  it — 
with  the  confidence  and  respect  of  all  concerned.  Further  political  honor-* 
awaited  him.  for  his  fellow  citizens,  recognizing  his  worth  and  ability,  elected 
him  to  represent  the  senatorial  district  in  the  upper  house  of  the  state  legis- 
lature. There  he  gave  careful  consideration  to  every' question  which  came 
up  for  settlement  and  his  loyalty  to  the  public  welfare  was  above  question. 
At  length  he  retired  from  active  business  pursuits,  coming  to  Morrison  in 
1858,  when  the  county  seat  was  changed  to  thi~  place,  spending  the  evening 
of  his  life  in  well  earned  rest  here.  He  was  a  good  business  man,  manifest- 


908  HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY 

* 

ing  unwearied  industry  and  capable  management,  so  that  his  undertakings 
were  crowned  with  success.  His  labors,  too,  were  of  a  character  that  proved 
a  benefit  to  the  community  at  large  while  promoting  his  individual  pros- 
perity. He  was  one  of  the  organizers,  stockholders  and  directors  of  the 
First  National  Bank  of  Morrison  and  during  his  service  as  county  clerk 
he  was  instrumental  in  forwarding  the  drainage  of  swamp  lands  in  this 
county  and  thus  reclaiming  them  for  the  purpose  of  cultivation.  He  was 
the  engineer  who  laid  out  the  drain  in  the  county  in  the  Green  river  district 
and  many  other  specific  evidences  of  his  usefulness  could  be  given.  Although 
not  identified  with  any  denomination,  he  had  strong  religious  views  and 
contributed  generously  to  the  support  of  the  churches,  desiring  the  moral 
development  of  the  community.  He  voted  the  democratic  ticket  but  was  not 
unalterably  bound  by  party  ties.  Aside  from  the  other  offices  which  he 
filled  he  acted  as  a  member  of  the  city  council  of  Morrison  and  in  com- 
munity affairs  took  a  deep  and  helpful  interest. 

W.  S.  Wilkinson  married  Frances  E.  Sampson,  who  was  born  in  Dux- 
bury,  Massachusetts,  in  1814,  and  was  also  of  English  lineage,  tracing  her 
ancestry  back  to  the  Mayflower.  Two  brothers  of  the  name  of  Sampson- 
Henry  and  William — were  passengers  on  that  historic  vessel  on  one  of  its 
voyages  to  the  new  world.  Mrs.  Wilkinson  traces  her  ancestry  back  to  the 
former.  Her  parents  were  Henry  Briggs  and  Nancy  (Turner)  Sampson. 
The  father  followed  a  sea-faring  life  and  became  captain  of  a  merchantman 
sailing  between  Massachusetts  and  the  chief  ports  of  Europe  and  the  East 
Indies.  About  1840  the  family  moved  westward  to  Tremont,  on  the  Illinois 
river,  where  they  lived  for  a  short  time  and  then  took  up  their  abode  at 
Como,  where  Captain  Sampson  conducted  a  hotel  for  many  years,  becoming 
one  of  the  historic  characters  of  that  locality.  His.  daughter,  Mrs.  Wilkin- 
son, was  a  most  estimable  lady,  her  life  being  ever  in  harmony  with  her 
professions  as  a  member  of  the  Swedenborgian  church.  Her  death  occurred 
in  1890.  while  Winfield  S.  Wilkinson  passed  away  in  1893,  at  the  age  of 
eighty-one  years.  In  their  family  were  the  following  children :  Mary  Chapin, 
who  became  the  wife  of  C.  H.  Cogswell,  a  physician  of  Cedar  Rapids,  Iowa, 
and  who  died  in  1903 ;  Alfred  Ernest,  reporter  for  the  supreme  court  at 
Austin,  Texas ;  Henry  B. ;  one  who  died  in  infancy ;  and  Frank,  also'  deceased. 

Henry  B.  Wilkinson  attended  the  public  schools  of  Sterling  and  of  Mor- 
rison and  after  entering  business  life  spent  nine  years  in  connection  with 
the  iron  and  steel  industries  and  also  two  or  three  years  in  the  Dakotas.  In 
1883  he  succeeded  his  uncle,  H.  R.  Sampson,  in  the  abstract  business,  in 
which  he  has  since  engaged,  covering  a  period  of  a  quarter  of  a  century. 
In  1901  a  company  was  formed  and  the  business  has  since  been  conducted 
under  the  firm  style  of  Wilkinson  &  Company,  abstractors.  In  connection 
with  his  other  interests,  Mr.  Wilkinson  is  a  stockholder  and  director  in  the 
First  National  Bank  of  Morrison. 

In  1903  was  celebrated  the  marriage  of  Henry  B.  Wilkinson  and  Abbietta 
Porter,  who  was  born  in  Newark,  New  Jersey.  They  are  well  known  and 
prominent  socially,  and  the  hospitality  of  their  home  is  enjoyed  by  their 
many  friends.  Mr.  Wilkinson  is  a  democrat  but  without  aspiration  for 


HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY  909 

political  office.  He -is,  however,  interested  in  the  welfare  and  development 
of  his  community  and  withholds  his  cooperation  from  no  movement  which 
he  deems  will  prove  of  benefit.  He  is  now  president  of  the  Odell  Public 
Library  board  arid  is  a  member  of  the  township  high  school  board.  The 
greater  part-  of  his  life  has  been  passed  in  Whiteside  county  and  the  .fact 
that  many  of  his  warmest  friends  are  those  who  have  known  him  from  his 
childhood  to  the  present  time  indicates  that  his  has  been  an  honorable  and 
upright  career. 


JAMES    S.    NANCE. 

It  is  no  easy  thing  .to  advance  from  a  position  of  limited  financial 
resources  to  one  of  affluence  but  this  Mr.  Nance  has  done,  living  a  life  of 
intense  and  well  directed  business  activity.  He  was  born  January  6,  1865, 
in  Genesee  township  on  a  farm  which  he  now  owns  and  operates. 

His  father,  James  R.  Nance,  was  a  native  of  Indiana,  born  December 
29.  1831,  and  his  last  days  were  spent  in  Sterling,  where  he  passed  away 
November  25,  1893.  His  wife,  who  bore  the  maiden  name  of  Eleanor 
Smith,  was  born  July  8,  1829,  and  died  October  7,  1900.  She,  too,  was  a 
resident  of  Sterling  at  the  time  of  her  demise.  It  was  in  the  year  1852 
that  James  R.  Nance  arrived  in  this  county,  and  during  the  first  year  he 
worked  by  the  month/  At  the  end  of  the  year  he  was  paid  one-half  of  his 
wages  in  gold  and  given  seven  and  a  half  acres  of  land  at  Genesee  Grove. 
He  walked  to  Fulton  and  took  a  steamboat  to  Rock  Island  and  on  the  trip 
was  robbed  of  his  money  and  the  paper  giving  him  title  to  the  land.  All 
that  he  had  left  was  seventy-five  cents,  which  he  had  in  his  inside  pocket. 
As  they  neared  Rock  Island  he  was  approached  by  one  of  the  hands  on  the 
boat,  who  told  him  if  he  would  treat  the  crowd  they  would  return  him  his 
papers  for  the  land.  He  said  that  it  was  impossible  for  him  to  do  so  but 
that  he  had  an  overcoat  that  he  would  pawn  for  the  treats,  and  the  drink 
cost  him  seventy-five  cents,  so  that  he  was  left  penniless.  His  papers,  how- 
ever, were  returned  to  him,  together  with  a  deed  of  eighty  acres  which  he 
had  bought.  He  left  the  boat  at  Rock  Island  and  walked  forty-two  miles 
to  the  home  of  an  uncle,  where  he  worked  until  he  obtained  sufficient  money 
to  enable  him  to  start  in  life  upon  an  independent  business  career.  He 
then  went  to  Indiana,  where  he  was  married  in  1854  to  Miss  Eleanor  Smith. 
With  his  bride  he  returned  to  this  county  and  upon  his  claim  erected  a 
little  log  cabin,  occupying  the  present  site  of  the  home  of  James  S.  Nance. 
With  characteristic  energy  he  began  the  development  of  his  farm,,  and  as 
the  years  passed  brought  the  land  under  a  high  state  of  cultivation.  At 
length  he  retired  in  1891  and  spent  his  remaining  days  in  the  enjoyment 
of  well  earned  rest  in  Sterling,  where  he  passed  away  November  25,  1893. 
His  widow  survived  him  for  about  seven  years  and  died  on  the  7th  of 
October,  1900.  in  Sterling.  In  the  family  of  this  worthy  couple  were  nine 
children:  Esahinda,  now  Mrs.  Becker,  of  Sterling;  Mrs.  Rebecca  Leinbech, 


910  HISTORY    OF    WHITESTDE    COUNTY 

also  a  resident  of  Sterling;  Mrs.  Anna  Johnson,  who  is  living  in  Arkansas; 
James  S.,  of  this  review;  Hattie;  and  Mary,  William,  Edith  and  Emma,  all 
deceased. 


James  S.  Nance  was  reared  upon  the  old  homestead  farm  and  early 
became  familiar  with  the  work  of  tilling  the  fields,  planting  the  crops  and 
in  the  late  autumn  gathering  the  harvests.  The  public  schools  afforded 
him  his  educational  privileges  and  when  twenty-one  years  of  age  he  began 
farming  on  his  own  account  by  renting  his  father's  place.  He  continued 
to  lease  it  year  after  year  until  the  death  of  his  father,  when  he  purchased 
one  hundred  and  sixty  acres  of  the  home  place  in  Genesee  township.  He 
has  since  extended  its  boundaries  somewhat,  for  his  farm  now  comprises 
one  hundred  and  eighty-six  acres  of  rich  and  productive  land.  He  makes 
a  specialty  of  stock-raising  and  at  the  same  time  produces  good  crops  through 
the  care  and  labor  which  he  bestows  upon  the  fields. 

On  the  31st  of  July,  1886,  Mr.  Nance  was  married  to  Miss  Sarah  Bush- 
man, who  was  born  in  Genesee  township,  February  15,  1865,  a  daughter 
of  Henry  and  Levina  (Burghduff)  Bushman.  Her  father,  a  native  of 
Cayuga  county,  New  York,  was  born  September  22,  1822,  and  died  Novem- 
ber 23,  1903.  The  mother's  birth  occurred  January  3,  1838,  in  Wayne 
county,  New  York,  and  she  passed  away  February  3,  1873.  There  were  nine 
children  in  that  family,  but  only  four  are  now  living:  Charles  H.,  a  resi- 
dent of  Carroll  county,  Illinois;  Colonel,  who  is  living  in  this  county;  Har- 
lan,  whose  home  is  in  Genesee  township;  and  Mrs.  Nance. 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  Nance  have  no  children  of  their  own  but  have  three 
adopted  children:  Bertha,  Clyde  and  Elsie  M.,  to  whom  they  give  all 
parental  care  and  attention.  They  are  members  of  the  United  Brethren 
church  and  are  interested  in  the  moral,  intellectual  and  social  progress  of 
the  community  as  well  as  in  its  material  development.  Mr.  Nance  gives 
his  political  allegiance  to  the  republican  party  and  keeps  well  informed 
on  the  questions  and  issues  of  the  day.  For  fifteen  years  he  served  as  school 
director  and  fraternally  he  is  connected  with  the  Modern  Woodmen  of 
America.  The  fact  that  many  of  his  stanchest  friends  are  those  who  have 
known  him  from  his  boyhood  to  the  present  indicates  that  his  life  has  been 
well  spent. 


ALLEN  R.  HENDRICKS. 

The  growth  and  prosperity  of  any  community  depends  upon  its  com- 
mercial and  industrial  interests,  and  in  this  connection  Mr.  Hendricks  is  one 
of  the  upbuilders  and  promoters  of  Sterling,  where  he  is  successfully  engaged 
in  trade  as  a  druggist  and  pharmacist.  He  was  born  in  Lancaster  county, 
Pennsylvania,  August  29,  1849,  his  parents  being  Ephraim  D.  and  Mary  D. 
(Rosenberry)  Hendricks,  who  were  native,?  of  the  Keystone  state.  The  pa- 
ternal grandfather  was  also  born  in  that  state,  where  he  followed  the  occupa- 
tion of  farming  until  his  death,  which  occurred  when  he  was  in  the  prime 


HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY  911 

of  life.  His  son,  Ephraim  D.  Hendricks,  was  one  of  a  large  family,  and  as 
a  young  man  he  learned  and  followed  the  tailor's  trade.  In  1851  he  made 
his  way  to  the  middle  west,  settling  in  Sterling,  Illinois,  where  he  engaged 
in  tailoring  for  a  year,  and  then  bought  a  farm  of  one  hundred  and  sixty 
acres  in  Jordan  township,  Whiteside  county.  Of  this  he  afterward  sold  forty 
acres,  and  cultivated  the  remainder  until  1863.  In  that  year  he  removed  to 
Clay  county,  Illinois,  where  he  again  purchased  a  tract  of  farming  land,  but 
in  1865  returned  to  Whiteside  county  and  bought  a  farm  near  Tampico,  upon 
which  he  resided  for  several  years.  On  the  expiration  of  that  period  he  made 
his  home  in  Sterling,  and  a  few  years  later  removed  to  Cawker  City,  Kansas, 
where  he  died  September  6,  1903,  at  the  venerable  age  of  seventy-nine  years. 
His  wife  survived  him  until  March  24,  1904,  passing  away  at  the  age  of 
severity-eight  years.  Both  were  members  of  the  Reformed  Mennonite  church. 
Mrs.  Hendricks'  father  was  also  a  native  of  Pennsylvania,  where  he  owned  a 
small  farm.  She  was  one  of  six  or  seven  children,  and  by  her  marriage  be- 
came the  mother  of  four  children :  Allen  R. ;  Benjamin  F.,  a  resident  of 
Morrison,  Illinois;  John  R.,  living  at  Walnut  Ridge,  Arkansas;  and  Charles 
R.,  whose  home  is  in  Glen  Elder,  Kansas. 

Allen  R.  Hendricks  was  not  quite  two  years  of  age  when  his  parents  took 
up  their  abode  near  Sterling.  Here  he  was  reared  to  manhood  and  acquired 
his  education.  His  boyhood  and  youth  were  passed  upon  the  home  farm, 
but  thinking  to  find  other  pursuits  more  congenial  than  the  work  of  the 
fields,  he  became  a  newsboy  on  the  railroad,  being  thus  engaged  for  one 
season.  He  next  began  clerking  in  a  drug  store,  and  served  for  eight  years 
in  that  capacity.  He  studied  pharmacy  under  Dr.  W.  J.  Gait,  and  upon  the 
death  of  his  preceptor  formed  a  partnership  with  Henry  Keefer  for  the  pur- 
chase of  Dr.  Gait's  store.  They  conducted  the  business  together  for  five 
years,  after  which  Mr.  Hendricks  sold  his  interest  and  started  upon  an  in- 
dependent business  venture.  He  remained  alone  in  the  successful  conduct 
of  a  drug  store  until  1905,  when  a  stock  company  was  formed  and  the  business 
was  continued  under  the  name  of  the  Hendricks  Drug  Company,  of  which 
A.  R.  Hendricks  is  president,  treasurer  and  manager.  He  has  a  fine  store,  well 
appointed  in  all  of  its  equipments,  and  carries  on  an  extensive  and  profitable 
business. 

On  the  25th  of  September,  1873,  Mr.  Hendricks  was  married  to  Miss 
Susan  Mover,  a  daughter  of  John  and  Elizabeth  (Moyer)  Moyer.  They 
have  become  the  parents  of  four  children :  Olive  Grace,  now  the  wife  of 
Edward  Haberley,  by  whom  she  has  one  daughter,  Marian ;  Leon  Sumner, 
who  died  when  a  little  more  than  four  years  of  age;  Lester  Blaine,  who  is  at- 
tending the  Illinois  State  University  at  Champaign,  where  he  is  studying 
electrical  engineering;  and  LeRoy  Russell,  who,  as  a  high  school  student,  is 
preparing  for  college.  Mrs.  Hendricks  is  a  member  of  the  Christian  church. 

Mr.  Hendricks  belongs  to  Sterling  Lodge,  No.  174,  I.  0.  0.  F.,  in  which 
he  is  serving  as  a  trustee.  He  is  likewise  a  member  of  the  Ancient  Order  of 
United  Workmen  and  has  filled  nearly  all  of  the  chairs,  having  for  two 
years  been  grand  master  of  the  state,  while  at  the  present  writing  he  is  one  of 
the  three  delegates  to  represent  the  state  in  the  supreme  body.  He  affiliates 


912  HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY 

with  the  Knights  of  the  Globe  and  the  Mystic  Workers,  and  enjoys  in  large 
measure  the  confidence  and  good  will  of  his  brethren  of  these  fraternities. 
Nor  is  Mr.  Hendricks  unknown  in  political  circles.  He  stands  stanchly  as  a 
supporter  of  republican  principles,  has  been  chairman  of  the  town  central 
committee,  and  is  serving  his  second  term  as  alderman  of  the  First  ward.  He 
was  for  six  years  assistant  supervisor,  and  during  one  year  of  that  time  was 
chairman  of  the  .county  board.  Thus  active  in  fraternal,  political  and  busi- 
ness circles,  he  is  well  known  as  a  leading  and  representative  citizen  of  Ster- 
ling, and  one  whose  genuine  worth  commands  for  him  the  good  will  and  high 
regard  of  those  with  whom  he  is  brought  in  contact.  Moreover,  he  has  been 
a  resident  of  the  county  for  much  more  than  a  half  century,  and  has,  there- 
fore, been  a  witness  of  the  greater  part  of  its  development  and  growth. 


FRED    L.    BAKER. 

Fred  L.  Baker,  who  carries  on  general  farming  and  stock-raking  upon 
a  tract  of  land  of  one  hundred  and  twenty  acres  on  section  15,  Mount  Pleas- 
ant township,  which  has  come  into  his  possession  as  the  result  of  the  energy 
and  capable  management  he  has  displayed  in  earlier  years,  was  born  in 
Tipton,  Cedar  county,  Iowa,  October  9,  1861,  his  parents  being  Jason  L. 
and  Martha  (Van  Meter)  Baker,  natives  of  New  York  and  Ohio  respectively. 
The  father  came  to  Whiteside  county  over  sixty  years  ago.  After  living  here 
for  a  time,  he  removed  to  Iowa  but  later  returned  to  this  county,  where 
he  made  his  home  until  his  death  in  December,  1877,  when  he  was  forty 
years  of  age.  His  widow  still  resides  at  Sterling,  at  the  age  of  sixty-six 
years.  They  were  married  in  Tipton,  Iowa,  where  the  father  carried  on 
work  at  the  carpenter's  trade.  In  fact  throughout  his  entire  life  he  was  thus 
identified  with  building  operations.  His  widow,  a  most  remarkable  lady, 
holds  membership  with  the  Fourth  Street  Methodist  Episcopal  church.  Their 
family  numbered  five  children:  Etta  J.,  who  became  the  wife  of  Andrew 
Knox  and  died  in  November,  1884;  Fred  L.,  of  this  review;  Will  H.,  who  is 
married  and  resides  in  San  Diego,  California,  where  he  carries  on  business 
as  a  contractor  and  builder;  Bert  F.,  who  at  one  time  taught  school  and 
was  superintendent  of  schools  at  Chadwick  and  afterward  at  Warren,  Illi- 
nois, for  five  years  but  now  resides  near  Minot,  North  Dakota,  where  he 
follows  farming,  although  in  the  meantime  he  engaged  in  the  insurance 
business ;  and  Cora  Belle,  who  died  in  1881,  at  the  age  of  eleven  years. 

Fred  L.  Baker  was  reared  in  Whiteside  county  and  attended  the  public 
schools  at  Unionville,  where  he  received  instruction  in  the  branches  of  learn- 
ing that  usually  constitute  the  public-school  curriculum.  He  has  followed 
farming  throughout  his  entire  life.  In  1894  he  purchased  his  present  place, 
known  as  the  Henry  Knox  farm.  Much  of  the  improvement  here  has  been 
done  by  Mr.  Baker,  who  keeps  in  touch  with  modern  ideas  of  progressive 
agriculture.  He  uses  the  latest  farm  machinery  to  facilitate  the  work  of  the 
fields  and  annually  produces  large  crops,  which  indicate  that  the  methods 
employed  in  carrying  on  his  farm  are  of  a  most  practical  character. 


HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY  913 

In  March,  1886,  Mr.  Baker  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Etta  Stone, 
a  native  of  Prophetstown  township,  and  a  daughter  of  Reed  and  Esther 
(Garrison)  Stone,  who  came  very  early  to  Whiteside  county.  Here  the 
father  engaged  in  farming  and  later  removed  ta  Michigan  but  subsequently 
came  again  to  this  county,  where  he  died  in  June,  1894,  at  the  age  of 
seventy-nine  years.  His  wife  passed  away  in  1897,  at  the  age  of  seventy- 
three  years.  Mr.  Stone  had  served  as  school  director  and  was  interested  in 
all  that  pertained  to  upbuilding  and  progress  here.  He  and  his  wife  had 
come  to  the  west  from  the  state  of  New  York  and  their  personal  worth  was 
indicated  by  the  high  regard  in  which  they  were  uniformly  held.  They 
had  a  family  of  nine  children,  seven  sons  and  two  daughters.  Nelson,  now 
a  farmer  of  South  Dakota,  married  Miss  Potter  and  has  a  family.  Sarah 
married  Orrin  Moran  and  lives  in  Michigan.  Charles,  who  wedded  Rosetta 
Moran,  is  a  resident  farmer  of  Michigan.  Arthur  makes  his  home  at  Spring 
Hill  in  this  county.  Philip,  who  married  Miss  Digby,  is  employed  in  the 
wire  mills  at  Rock  Falls.  Mrs.  Baker  is  the  next  of  the  family.  Erastus, 
who  married  Miss  Wilson,  of  Morrison,  is  employed  in  the  Keystone  Mills 
at  Rock  Falls.  Carson,  who  wedded  Miss  White,  is  a  barber  of  Battle  Creek, 
Iowa.  Harry,  who  married  Miss  Rosetta  Crump,  of  Mount  Pleasant  town- 
ship, this  county/  is  now  located  in  Nebraska. 

The  home  of  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Baker  has  been  blessed  with  two  sons  and 
a  daughter:  Clarence  L.,  who  at  the  age  of  twenty-one  years,  aids  in  the 
operation  of  the  home  farm;  Vernon  L.,  who  at  the  age  of  sixteen  years  is 
attending  the  Mount  Pleasant  high  school;  and  Edna  B.,  twelve  years  of 
age,  also  a  student  in  the  schools. 

Politically  Mr.  Baker  is  independent,  supporting  men  and  measures 
rather  than  party.  He  has  been  school  director  for  many  years  and  is  now 
serving  as  highway  commissioner,  which  office  he  has  filled  for  two  years. 
In  this  position  he  is  giving  excellent  service  and  has  done  much  to  im- 
prove the  public  highways.  Socially  he  is  connected  with  the  Modern 
Woodmen  camp  of  Morrison  and  his  wife  is  a  member  of  the  Mystic  Work- 
ers and  also  of  the  Woman's  Relief  Corps,  and  she  attends  the  Methodist 
Episcopal  church.  While  a  native  of  Iowa,  Mr.  Baker  has  spent  the  greater 
part  of  his  life  in  this  county  and  the  fact  that  many  of  his  warmest  friends 
are  those  who  have  known  him  from  his  boyhood  to  the  present  time  is  an 
indication  that  his  has  been  an  active,  upright  career. 


RICHARD  W.  COVEL. 

Richard  W.  Covel,  a  representative  of  the  farming  interests  of  Coloma 
township,  was  born  in  East  Roxbury,  Delaware  county,  New  York,  Decem- 
ber 28,  1848,  his  parents  being  Edwin  and  Irene  (Wilson)  Covel,  who  were 
also  natives  of  the  Empire  state,  as  were  likewise  the  paternal  and  maternal 
grandparents.  They  were  prosperous  farming  people  of  the  locality  J  and  en- 
joyed the  respect  of  friends  and  neighbors. 


914  HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY 

Richard  W.  Covel,  reared  under  the  parental  roof,  acquired  his  educa- 
tion in  the  public  schools,  was  trained  to  habits  of  industry  and  integrity,  and 
thus  laid  a  good  foundation  for  his  life  work.  He  was  about  twenty-four  years 
of  age  when  he  started  out  on  his  own  account,  and  in  the  spring  of  1874 
he  arrived  in  Sterling,  Illinois,  since  which  time  he  has  made  his  home  in 
Whiteside  county.  Here  he  sought  and  soon  found  employment  as  a  farm 
laborer,  and  was  thus  engaged  for  about  ten  years,  during  which  time  he 
carefully  saved  his  earnings,  and  at  length  gained  a  sum  sufficient  to  justify 
his  purchase  of  a  farm.  He  then  bought  the  E.  Bowen,  or  "VVoodlawn  farm, 
upon  which  he  lived  for  nine  years,  and  next  purchased  the  farm  where  he 
made  his  home  for  sixteen  years.  On  the  expiration  of  that  period  he  took 
up  his  abode  on  the  place  which  he  now  occupies,  and  where  he  has  lived 
since  1903.  Here  he  owns  two  hundred  and  sixty-one  acres  of  arable  land 
under  a  good  state  of  cultivation,  and  in  its  midst  stands  a  comfortable  dwell- 
ing, with  large  barns  and  many  substantial  outbuildings  for  the  shelter  of 
grain  and  stock.  Everything  is  now  in  a  state  of  good  repair,  and  he  uses  the 
latest  improved  machinery  to  facilitate  the  work  of  the  fields.  In  addition 
to  tilling  the  soil  he  has  recently  equipped  his  place  for  the  conduct  of  a  dairy 
business,  and  is  increasing  his  interests  along  this  line. 

On  the  4th  of  January,  1880,  Mr.  Covel  was,  married  to  Miss  Amanda 
Delp,  a  daughter  of  Jacob  and  Cornelia  (Thompson)  Delp,  natives  of  Illi- 
nois. Mrs.  Covel  was  born  on  the  8th  of  October,  1861,  in  Jordan  township. 
Unto  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Covel  have  been  born  two  daughters  and  two  sons,  Flor- 
ence D.,  Mary  Pearle,  Richard  and  John  Russell,  all  of  whom  are  under  the 
parental  roof. 

In  religious  faith  Mr.  Covel  is  a  Methodist,  and  his  belief  guides  hi.* 
acts  in  all  his  relations  with  his  fellow  men.  His  political  preference  is  for 
the  republican  party,  but  official  honors  and  emoluments  have  little  attrac- 
tion for  him,  as  he  prefers  to  concentrate  his  energies  upon  his  business  af- 
fairs, and«  by  his  close  application  and  executive  ability  he  has  become  a 
prosperous  farmer. 


CHARLES  A.  HAMILTON. 

On  the  roster  of  county  officials  of  Whiteside  county  appears  the  name 
of  Charles  A.  Hamilton,  who  in  the  fall  of  1906  was  elected  sheriff.  He  is 
now  discharging  the  duties  of  the  office  without  fear  or  favor  and  his  course 
has  won  uniform  commendation.  He  is  recognized  as  one  of  tho  stalwart 
supporters  of  the  republican  party  and  one  of  its  leaders  in  local  ranks. 

His  birth  occurred  at  Lyndon  in  this  county,  September  13.  1858,  his 
parents  being  John  M.  and  Anna  B.  (Thompson)  Hamilton.  The  father 
was  born  in  Northampton,  Massachusetts,  May  12,  1814,  and  died  in  Feb- 
ruary, 1906.  He  was  of  Scotch-Irish  descent  and  was  a  son  of  Adam  R. 
Hamilton,  who  served  his  country  as  a  soldier  in  the  war  of  1812,  being  a 
member  of  a  Massachusetts  regiment.  John  M.  Hamilton  devoted  his  life 


C.  A.  HAMILTON 


LIBRARY 

OF  THE 

UNIVERSITY  OF  ILLINOIS 


HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY  917 

to  general  agricultural  pursuits  and  in  1835  removed  from  the  state  of  New 
York  to  Illinois  with  his  parents,  who  settled  in  Lyndon  township.  Three 
families — the  Woodruffs,  the  Dudleys  and  the  Hamiltons — came  at  that  time 
and  were  the  first  settlers  of  the  district.  John  M.  Hamilton  and  his  father 
entered  government  land,  upon  which  they  took  up  their  abode  and  spent 
their  remaining  days,  and  when  their  life's  labors  were  ended  their  remains 
were  interred  in  the  Lyndon  cemetery.  As  the  years  passed  John  M.  Ham- 
ilton accumulated  considerable  property,  meeting  with  gratifying  prosperity 
in  his  business  undertakings.  He  was  also  an  advocate  of  everything  that 
promoted  the  intellectual  and  moral  progress  of  the  community  and  was  a 
charter  member  of  the  Congregational  church  of  Lyndon,  in  which  both  he 
and  his  father  served  as  deacons.  In  fact,  throughout  the  community  he 
was  everywhere  known  as  Deacon  Hamilton.  In  politics  he  was  an  old-line 
whig  until  after  the  organization  of  the  republican  party,  when  he  cast  his 
ballot  for  Abraham  Lincoln.  His  fellow  townsmen,  recognizing  his  worth 
and  ability,  called  him  to  various  township  offices.  His  hearing  becoming 
affected  so  that  it  interfered  with  his  participation  in  public  interests,  he 
devoted  the  greater  part  of  his  time  to  reading  and  became  a  well-informed 
man.  He  felt  it  his  duty  as  a  citizen  to  go  to  the  polls  and  cast  his  ballot 
in  support  of  the  principles  which  he  deemed  would  best  conserve  the  public 
welfare  and  thus  never  failed  to  exercise  his  right  of  franchise. 

John  M.  Hamilton  married  Mrs.  Anna  B.  (Thompson)  Wilder,  a  widow, 
who  was  born  in  Pennsylvania  and  died  November  27,  1890.  She  was  of 
Scotch  lineage  and  she  held  membership  in  the  Congregational  church.  By 
this  marriage  there  were  born  three  children,  of  whom  George  W.  died  in 
infancy.  The  others  are  Charles  A.  and  Frederick  E.  The  latter  was  born 
October  29,  1860,  and  after  some  years'  connection  with  the  Adams  Express 
Company  died  in  1894,  leaving  a  son,  Charles  L.  Hamilton,  who  is  now  a 
farmer  of  Lyndon.  Previous  to  his  marriage  to  Mrs.  Wilder,  Mr.  Hamilton 
had  wedded  Emily  Wright,  of  New  York,  and  to  them  were  born  three 
children :  John  L.,  who  enlisted  in  the  One  Hundred  and  Fifty-sixth  Illinois 
Volunteer  Infantry  and  is  now  in  the  Soldiers'  Home  at  Quincy,  Illinois; 
Caroline  A.,  the  deceased  wife  of  J.  H.  Smith,  of  Morrison;  and  Elvira  P., 
the  deceased  wife  of  Philip  M.  Stone. 

Charles  A.  Hamilton  attended  the  district  schools  and  the  Lyndon  high 
school.  He  was  reared  on  a  farm  and  lived  upon  the  old  homestead,  care- 
fully conducting  agricultural  interests  until  he  was  elected  sheriff  in  the 
fall  of  1906.  He  still  owns  the  old  home  property,  comprising  two  hundred 
and  fifty-four  acres  of  rich  and  productive  land.  This  place,  upon  which  the 
family  residence  now  stands,  has  never  been  out  of  possession  of  the  Ham- 
iltons since  it  was  entered  from  the  government.  In  his  farm  work  Mr. 
Hamilton  was  energetic  and  capable  and  the  fields  annually  brought  to  him 
a  good  return  for  his  labor. 

In  June,  1881,  was  celebrated  the  marriage  of  Charles  A.  Hamilton  and 
Miss  Theora  E.  Helms,  who  was  born  in  Ustick  township  in  1861,  a  daugh- 
ter of  Henry  E.  and  Lucy  G.  Helms.  Her  father  was  a  farmer  and  a  native 
of  Hamburg,  Germany,  whence  he  came  to  the  United  States  when  sixteen 


918  HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY 

years  of  age.  On  coming  to  Whiteside  county  he  took  up  his  abode  in 
Ustick  township.  He  wedded  Lucy  G.  Gould,  a  daughter  of  Thomas  Gould, 
one  of  the  pioneer  settlers  of  Lyndon  township.  Unto  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Ham- 
ilton were  born  seven  children :  Grace  E.,  born  August  4,  1885,  who  is  now 
engaged  in  teaching  school;  Arthur  E.,  who  was  born  October  30,  1887,  and 
is  attending  the  law  department  of  the  University  of  Michigan  at  Ann  Ar- 
bor; Herbert  E.,  who  passed  away  when  but  three  years  of  age;  Lucy 
E.,  whose  birth  occurred  in  1895;  John  Henry,  born  in  1899;  Cora  L.,  in 
1903 ;  and  Donald  W.,  in  1906. 

The  parents  were  members  of  the  Congregational  church.  Mr.  Ham- 
ilton is  connected  with  the  Masons,  the  Knights  of  Pythias,  the  Woodmen 
and  the  Mystic  Workers.  His  political  allegiance  is  given  to  the  republican 
party  and  he  has  served  as  school  director  and  town  clerk,  while  for  thirteen 
terms  he  was  assessor  of  his  township.  He  has  always  taken  an  active  inter- 
est in  party  affairs  and  in  the  fall  of  1906  was  elected  on  the  republican 
ticket  to  the  office  of  sheriff,  in  which  position  he  is  now  serving,  being  most 
prompt  and  reliable  in  the  performance  of  the  duties  that  devolve  upon  him 
in  this  connection.  As  a  representative  of  one  of  the  oldest  families  of  the 
county  he  is  well  known  and,  as  did  his  father  and  grandfather,  he  stands 
for  all  that  is  progressive  and  helpful  in  citizenship. 


GEORGE  POWELL  PERRY. 

George  Powell  Perry,  senior  partner  of  the  firm  of  Perry  &  Perry,  drug- 
gists, was  born  in  Chester  county,  Pennsylvania,  October  24,  1849,  his  par- 
ents being  Henry  C.  and  Malinda  B.  (Jefferis)  Perry,  who  resided  at  Wil- 
mington, Delaware.  They  had  two  sons,  Enos  J.  and  George  P.  The  mother 
died  when  they  were  only  eight  months  old,  and  the  father  afterward  married 
Miss  Clarissa  Thomas,  of  Maryland.  There  were  three  children  born  of  that 
union:  Harry  L.,  who  lives  in  Dallastown,  Pennsylvania;  Clara  Viola,  the 
wife  of  David  Hyson,  of  Hampstead,  Maryland;  and  Effie  Jane.  The  father 
was  a  carpenter  by  trade  and  afterward  followed  the  occupation  of  farming. 
He  came  to  Illinois  about  1855  and  settled  in  Carroll  county,  where  he 
turned  his  attention  to  general  agricultural  pursuits.  He  afterward  removed 
from  there  to  Red  Oak,  Iowa,  where  he  died  in  1871,  at  the  age  of  forty-seven 
years.  His  first  wife  died  in  1850,  while  his  second  wife  survived  him  for 
.only  three  months. 

George  P.  Perry  and  his  twin  brother,  following  their  mother's  death, 
were  reared  by  some  aunts  and  their  maternal  grandmother,  and  Enos  J. 
Perry  is  now  a  distinguished  dentist  of  Chicago.  George  P.  Perry  was  reared 
to  manhood  in  Carroll  county.  Illinois,  upon  a  farm.  He  attended  the  public 
schools  of  Mount  Carroll  and  afterward  took  up  the  study  of  medicine  under 
Dr.  Shinier,  while  for  one  term  he  was  a  student  in  the  Chicago  Medical 
College  in  1871.  He  afterward  entered  a  drug  store  at  Fulton,  Illinois,  where 
he  remained  for  a  year  or  more,  and  then  spent  sixteen  months  in  a  drug 


HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY  919 

store  in  Moline.  In  1874  he  came  to  Sterling,  where  he  was  employed  in 
different  drug  stores,  and  on  the  4th  of  July,  1888,  he  became  proprietor  of  a 
store,  which  he  has  since  conducted.  He  carries  a  large  and  well  selected 
line  of  drugs  and  kindred  goods,  tastefully  arranged,  and  the  business  is  ac- 
corded a  liberal  patronage  in  recognition  of  the  honorable  methods  pursued 
by  the  house. 

In  September,  1875,  Mr.  Perry  was  married,  in  Mount  Carroll,  to  Miss 
Sophia  E.  Shirk,  a  daughter  of  Jacob  and  Susan  (Stauffer)  Shirk.  They 
have  become  the  parents  of  three  children:  Raymond,  a  resident  of  New 
York  city,  who  married  Emily  Russell,  a  niece  of  Sol  Smith  Russell,  the  re- 
nowned actor;  William  H.,  who  is  a  senior  in  the  medical  department  of  the 
Northwestern  University,  and  who  married  Miss  Mary  A.  Davis,  by  whom 
he  has  one  child,  Sophie  Marie;  and  Linda,  the  wife  of  E.  W.  Aument,  of 
Sterling,  by  whom  she  has  one  son,  Richard  Perry  Aument. 

The  parents  are  members  of  the  Baptist  church,  in  the  work  of  which 
they  are  deeply  and  helpfully  interested,  and  Mr.  Perry  is  serving  as  one  of 
the  deacons.  Politically  he  was  a  republican  until  recent  years,  but  has  now 
very  strong  tendencies  toward  the  prohibition  party.  He  resides  at  No.  408 
West  Third  street.  His  worth  and  reliability  as  a  business  man  and  citizen 
are  widely  known  and  have  gained  him  classification  with  the  representative 
and  honored  residents  of  this  city. 


ADAM  C.  LEINBACH. 

Adam  C.  Leinbach,  who  has  long  been  actively  and  successfully  asso- 
ciated with  agricultural  interests  in  Whiteside  county,  and  is  now  a  well 
known  real  estate  dealer  of  Sterling,  was  born  in  Berks  county,  Pennsylvania, 
near  Reading,  July  3,  1855.  His  paternal  grandfather,  Jacob  Leinbach,  was 
also  a  native  of  Pennsylvania,  but  of  German  descent.  He  was  a  farmer  by 
occupation,  and  both  he  and  his  wife.  Mrs.  Catharine  Leinbach,  lived  to  an 
advanced  age  and  reared  a  large  family.  Their  son,  James  Leinbach,  was 
born  in  the  Keystone  state,  made  farming  his  life  work  and  is  now  living 
retired  in  Reading,  Pennsylvania,  at  the  age  of  eighty-one  years.  He  mar- 
ried Catharine  Ahrens,  who  was  likewise  born  in  Pennsylvania,  although  her 
father  was  a  native  of  France.  On  coming  to  the  new  world  he  settled  in 
Berks  county,  where  he  followed  carpentering  and  farming.  Both  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  James  Leinbach  are  still  living,  and  are  members  of  the  Reformed 
church.  Their  family  numbered  ten  children,  six  sons  and  four  daughters: 
Adam  C.,  of  Sterling;  Reuben,  of  Reading,  Pennsylvania;  James,  who  is 
living  in  Richmond,  Pennsylvania;  John,  deceased;  Calvin  and  Washington, 
who  are  residents  of  Reading;  Mary;  Katie;  Angeline;  and  Hattie. 

In  the  county  of  his  nativity  Adam  C.  Leinbach  was  reared  upon  a  farm 
and  attended  the  common  schools,  remaining  under  the  parental  roof  until 
he  had  attained  his  majority.  He  spent  one  year,  however,  in  working  at  the 
carpenter's  trade.  He  was  afterward  employed  at  farm  labor  by  the  month 


920  HISTORY    OF   WHITESIDE    COUNTY 

and,  thinking  to  have  better  business  opportunities  in  the  middle  west,  he 
came  to  Sterling  in  1877  and  soon  secured  a  position  as  a  farm  hand.  De- 
siring that  his  labors,  however,  should  more  directly  benefit  himself,  he 
rented  a  farm  for  two  years,  after  which  he  married.  He  then  continued  to 
cultivate  rented  land  until  about  1888,  when,  with  the  capital  he  had  saved 
from  his  earnings,  he  purchased  a  farm  of  eighty  acres  in  Genesee  township, 
Whiteside  county,  and  devoted  four  years  to  its  further  development  and  im- 
provement. He  then  sold  that  property  and  bought  one  hundred  and  sixty 
acres  known  as  the  David  Wetzel  farm,  which  he  still  owns.  He  cultivated 
it  successfully,  annually  gathering  good  crops  until  1900,  when  he  took  up 
his  abode  in  the  county  seat  and  established  a  real-estate  business.  He  has 
since  negotiated  many  important  property  transfers,  and  his  well  directed 
energy  and  keen  business  discernment  are  constituting  strong  elements  in  a 
gratifying  success. 

On  the  10th  of  February,  1881,  Mr.  Leinbach  was  married  to  Miss  Re- 
becca Nance,  a  daughter  of  Harvey  and  Eleanor  (Smith)  Nance.  They  have 
become  the  parents  of  five  children :  Clarence,  who  is  a  farmer  of  Lee 
county,  Illinois,  married  Clara  Kaffman,  and  they  have  two  children,  Mildred 
and  Clarence  M.  Katie,  Henry,  John  and  Calvin  are  all  yet  at  home. 

The  parents  are  consistent  and  faithful  members  of  the  Christian  church, 
and  in  the  work  of  the  church  they  take  an  active  and  helpful  interest.  Mr. 
Leinbach's  political  allegiance  is  given  to  the  republican  party,  and  he  is  a 
public-spirited  man,  who  withholds  his  aid  and  cooperation  from  no  move- 
ment for  the  public,  good.  In  his  business  career  there  has  been  not  a  single 
esoteric  phase,  on  the  contrary  all  has  been  open  and  above  board,  and  he 
merits  the  success  that  he  has  achieved,  and  enjoys  in  full  measure  the  con- 
fidence of  those  with  whom  he  has  been  brought  in  contact. 


THOMAS  E.  ROBINSON. 

Thomas  E.  Robinson  is  now  living  retired  in  Rock  Falls,  b"ut  for  many 
years  was  identified  with  the  farming  interests  of  this  county,  and  his  labor 
was  intelligently  directed,  his  sound  judgment  and  unfaltering  industry 
bringing  to  him  the  success  which  enables  him  to  enjoy  many  of  the  com- 
forts and  some  of  the  luxuries  of  life  without  further  recourse  to  the  active 
duties  of  business  life. 

He  was  born  in  Coloma  township,  this  county,  June  11,  1864,  his  parent* 
being  Thomas  and  Sarah  (Hale)  Robinson,  the  former  a  native  of  England 
and  the  latter  of  Pittsburg,  Pennsylvania.  The  father  was  born  in  Lan- 
cashire on  the  6th  of  January,  1801,  and  in  the  place  of  his  nativity  was 
reared  to  manhood.  He  lost  his  father  when  very  young,  and  the  support 
of  his  widowed  mother  and  a  brother  devolved  upon  him.  In  early  life  he 
followed  the  sea,  spending  three  and  a  half  years  on  one  vessel,  engaged  in 
commerce,  and  visited  all  the  principal  seaports  of  the  world.  He  was  after- 
ward upon  a  British  man-of-war.  The  experiences  of  his  life  were  varied. 


HISTORY    OP    WHITESIDE    COUNTY  921 

Born  and  reared  in  England,  he  had  some  unusual  adventures  during  his  sea- 
faring experience,  and  after  he  left  the  sea  he  was  employed  in  various  ways 
in  his  native  land  until  he  resolved  to  seek  a  home  in  America.  It  was  about 
1844,  in  company  with  a  cousin,  that  he  crossed  the  Atlantic  to  the  new 
world.  He  first  located  in  Luzerne  county,  Pennsylvania,  where  he  worked 
in  the  mines,  receiving  much  better  wages  than  are  paid  for  such  service  in 
the  old  country.  Carefully  saving  his  earnings,  he  was  soon  able  to  pur- 
chase a  lot  in  Pittston,  upon  which  he  erected  a  good  residence.  He  followed 
mining  for  seven  or  eight  years,  and  during  that  time  was  married. 

It  was  on  New  Year's  day  of  1848  that  Thomas  Robinson  was  joined 
in  wedlock  to  Miss  Sarah  Hale,  a  native  of  Pittsburg,  and  a  sister  of  Mrs.  L.  L. 
Emmons.  They  remained  in  Pennsylvania  until  after  the  birth  of  their 
two  eldest  sons,  when,  attracted  by  the  opportunities  of  the'  middle  west,  Mr. 
Robinson  brought  his  family  to  Illinois,  settling  in  Coloma  township,  White- 
side  county,  where  he  joined  his  brother-in-law,  Mr.  Emmons.  He  found 
here  a  district  largely  undeveloped  and  unimproved.  The  railroads  had  not 
yet  been  built  and  Whiteside  county  seemed  far  from  any  commercial  center 
of  importance,  so  that  the  early  settlers  had  to  depend  largely  upon  what 
they  could  raise  and  produce.  Mr.  Robinson  first  purchased  forty  acres  of 
land,  upon  which  not  a  furrow  had  been  turned  nor  an  improvement  made. 
He  also  bought  a  little  school  house,  which  he  moved  onto  his  farm  and  con- 
verted into  a  dwelling.  Thus,  having  established  a  home  for  his  family, 
he  at  once  began  the  cultivation  of  his  place,  and  with  characteristic  energy 
carried  forward  the  work  of  tilling  the  soil  until  he  had  brought  his  farm 
under  a  high  state  of  cultivation.  In  the  early  days  he  had  to  haul  his  grain 
to  Chicago  with  ox  teams.  It  was  a  slow  and  tedious  process,  but  there  was 
no  nearer  market.  After  a  time,  however,  railroads  were  built,  so  that  it  was 
less  difficult  to  place  the  crops  on  sale  at  the  centers  of  trade.  As  he  pros- 
pered in  his  undertakings,  Mr.  Robinson  purchased  an  adjoining  tract  of 
land  of  forty  acres,  and  also  about  forty  acres  in  Montmorency  township. 
As  the  years  passed  he  converted  the  once  wild  land  into  one  of  the  most 
desirable  and  attractive  farms  of  its  size  in  the  locality.  In  addition  to  the 
tilling  of  the  soil  he  also  gave  considerable  attention  to  the  raising  of  horses, 
cattle  and  hog's,  and  at  one  time  made  a  sale  of  hogs  to  the  amount  of  twelve 
hundred  and  thirty-eight  dollars.  He  also  invested  in  Kansas  land,  and  until 
within  a  short  time  of  his  death  owned  three  quarter  sections  in  Grove  and 
Dodge  counties  in  addition  to  his  farm  in  this  county. 

In  1886  he  left  his  farm  and  removed  to  Rock  Falls,  where  his  remain- 
ing days  were  passed  in  honorable  retirement,  save  for  the  supervision  which 
he  gave  to  his  invested  interests.  He  reached  the  remarkable  old  age  of  one 
hundred  years,  one  month  and  seventeen  days,  and  that  he  retained  his 
mental  and  physical  faculties  largely  unimpaired  during  the  evening  of  life 
is  indicated  by  the  fact  that  he  transacted  business  up  to  within  twenty  days 
of  his  demise.  He  was  the  owner  of  a  number  of  residences  in  Rock  Falls 
and  derived  from  this  property,  as  well  as  his  farms,  a  substantial  and  grati- 
fying income.  Mrs.  Robinson  passed  away  ten  years  prior  to  the  death  of 
her  husband,  her  death  occurring  February  13,  1895,  when  she  was  seventy 


922  HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY 

years  of  age.  Her  remains  were  interred  in  Rock  Falls  cemetery,  where  a 
neat  monument  now  mark?  her  last  resting  place.  They  were  among  the 
most  honored  and  worthy  pioneer  people  of  the  county,  being  uniformly  es- 
teemed by  reason  of  their  many  sterling  traits  of  character,  Both  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  Robinson  were  Methodists  in  religious  faith,  although  the  former  was 
reared  in  the  faith  of  the  Episcopal  church.  He  became  a  stalwart  advocate 
of  democratic  principles,  /or  he  believed  their  adoption  would  best  concern 
the  public  welfare,  yet  he  never  sought  nor  desired  office,  nor  took  an  active 
part  in  politics  aside  from  voting.  He  was  recognized  as  a  man  of  marked 
business  ability  and  achieved  most  creditable  success  by  reason  of  hLs  sound 
judgment  in  business  affairs,  his  perseverance  and  his  unwearied  industry. 
He  was,  moreover,  a  man  of  sterling  character  and  worth,  of  undoubted  com- 
mercial integrity  and  of  high  ideals,  who  enjoyed  in  unqualified  degree  the 
respect  and  esteem  of  all  with  whom  he  was  associated. 

The  home  of  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Robinson  was  blessed  with  eight  children,  five 
sons  and  three  daughters:  Charles,  who  is  now  living  at  Belgrade,  Nebraska; 
John  L.,  of  Rock  Falls;  William  P.,  also  a  resident  of  Belgrade;  Rose,  the 
deceased  wife  of  Marshall  Oakley;  Carrie,  the  wife  of  Paul  Jones,  of  Fresno, 
California;  Anna;  Thomas  E. ;  and  James,  deceased. 

In  taking  up  the  personal  history  of  Thomas  E.  Robinson,  we  present  to 
our  readers  the  life  record  of  one  who  is  widely  and  favorably  known  in  this 
part  of  the  state,  being  a  representative  of  an  old  pioneer  family.  He  was 
reared  as  a  farm  boy  in  Coloma  township,  early  taking  his  place  in  the  fields 
to  assist  in  the  plowing,  planting  and  harvesting.  The  district  schools  af- 
forded him  his  educational  privileges,  and  when  not  busy  with  his  text-books 
he  gave  his  assistance  to  his  father  in  the  development  and  improvement  of 
the  home  farm  until  he  had  attained  his  majority.  Mr.  Robinson  was  mar- 
ried at  Nelson,  Illinois,  and  then  carried  on  farming  on  his  own  account  until 
1890,  when,  on  account  of  his  wife's  ill  health,  he  removed  to  Rock  Falls, 
where  he  has  since  made  his  home. 

It  was  on  the  5th  of  November,  1884,  that  Mr.  Robinson  was  united  in 
marriage  to  Miss  Lamina  J.  Stone,  of  Nelson,  this  state,  a  daughter  of  Burrell 
and  Isabel  (McNeil)  Stone.  There  were  two  children  of  this  marriage— 
Isabel,  who  died  at  the  age  of  thirteen  months  and  twenty-two  days;  and 
George  Lester,  who  is  now  living  with  his  mother  in  Florida.  On  the  23d 
of  May,  1899,  Mr.  Robinson  was  again  married,  his  second  union  being  with 
Miss  Rose  Carr,  of  Nevada,  Iowa,  and  they  have  two  children:  Revoe  and 
Opal. 

Mrs.  Robinson's  parents,  Benjamin  and  Abigail  (Poole)  Carr,  are  natives 
of  Iowa,  and  still  live  in  Nevada,  that  state,  where  her  father  is  engaged  in 
business  as  a  mason  and  contractor.  He  is  a  son  of  Ananias  and  Jane 
(Franklin)  Carr,  also  residents  of  Nevada,  Iowa,  their  other  children  being 
William  Henry,  now  deceased;  Jesse  Edward;  Daniel  Brimerman,  deceased; 
•Benoni  Fortner;  Phebe  Ellen,  deceased;  Sarah  Jane;  and  Mary  Elizabeth. 
The  father  of  this  family  has  one  son  by  a  former  marriage,  James  Nathan 
Carr,  and  the  mother  has  also  born  married  twice,  her  first  husband  being 
John  Manifee,  by  whom  she  has  one  son,  George  Manifee.  Her  parents  were 


HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY  923 

Thomas  and  Polly  Franklin.  Ananias  Carr  is  a  son  of  Nathan  and  Sallie 
(Willie)  Carr.  The  maternal  grandfather  of  Mrs.  Rose  Robinson  was  John 
Presley  Poole,  who  followed  the  occupation  of  farming.  He  married  Ann 
Jordan  and  died  at  the  age  of  eighty-one  years,  while  his  wife  passed  away 
at  the  age  of  eighty-six  years.  -They  were  the  parents  of  eleven  children,  six 
of  whom  are  now  living:  Elza,  a  resident  of  Nevada,  Iowa;  John,  whose 
home  is  in  California;  Mary,  the  wife  of  William  Kerr,  of  Nevada,  Iowa; 
George,  a  resident  of  Superior,  Nebraska;  Mrs.  Abigail  Carr,  the  mother  of 
Mrs.  Robinson ;  and  Henry,  of  Nelson,  Nebraska.  Another  member  of  the 
family  reached  mature  years — Louisa,  who  became  the  wife  of  George  Hyden 
and  died,  leaving  a  family.  The  other  children  died  in  early  life.  Unto  Mr. 
and  Mrs.  Benjamin  Carr  were  born  four  children,  three  daughters  and  a  son: 
Rose,  now  Mrs.  Robinson;  Myrtle,  the  wife  of  John  Ost,  of  Rock  Falls; 
Laura,  the  wife  of  J.  H.  Anderson,  a  practicing  lawyer  of  Des  Moines,  Iowa; 
and  Frankie,  who  died  at  the  age  of  eight  years. 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  Robinson  are  faithful  members  of  the  Methodist  Episcopal 
church,  and  are  interested  in  its  work  and  the  extension  of  its  influence. 
Politically  Mr.  Robinson  is  a  republican.  For  the  past  eighteen  years  he 
has  lived  in  Rock  Falls,  where  he  has  valuable  property  holdings,  including 
ten  good  residences  and  lots,  and  also  two  vacant  lots.  From  his  property  he 
derives  a  good  income  that  enables  him  to  live  retired.  In  former  years  he 
was  very  active  in  agricultural  lines,  and  his  carefully  directed  labors 
brought  to  him  the  success  which  is  now  his,  making  him  one  of  the  men 
of  affluence  of  the  community.  The  Robinson  family  has  been  a  prominent 
one  in  the  county  from  pioneer  times,  and,  like  his  father,  Mr.  Robinson  com- 
mands the  respect  and  good  will  of  all  who  know  him. 


CHARLES   C.   McMAHON. 

Charles  C.  McMahon,  a  member  of  the  Whiteside  county  bar  and  now 
city  attorney  of  Fulton,  was  born  in  Charlottetown  on  Prince  Edward  Island 
in  the  gulf  of  St.  Lawrence,  June  20,  1860.  He  is  a  son  of  Francis  and  Rosa 
McA'Voy  McMahon,  both  of  whom  were  natives  of  the  north  of  Ireland 
but  prior  to  their  marriage  came  with  their  respective  families  to  the  new 
world,  settling  on  Prince  Edward  Island.  The  year  1869  witnessed  their 
arrival  in  Fulton.  Francis  McMahon  was  a  malster  but  following  his  re- 
moval to  Whiteside  county  turned  his  attention  to  farming.  He  rented 
land  in  Fulton  township,  where  he  engaged  in  farming  from  1875  until 
1900,  when  he  retired  from  active  business  life.  He  is  now  deceased  and  his 
wife  passed  away  in  February,  1905.  For  many  years  he  was  numbered 
among  the  respected  and  worthy  residents  of  his  community  and  though  he 
never  sought  to  figure  prominently  in  public  life  his  activity  and  reliability 
in  business  made  him  numbered  among  the  substantial  citizens.  Unto  Mr. 
and  Mrs.  McMahon  were  born  the  following  children:  Ellen,  the  wife  of 
N.  J.  Oaks,  of  Clinton,  Iowa;  Annie,  the  wife  of  Austin  Bell,  of  Fulton; 


924  HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY 

James,  deceased;  Charles  C.,  of  this  review;  Francis,  of  Fenton  township, 
Whiteside  county ;  Catherine,  who  is  the  wife  of  James  McDonald  and  resides 
in  Portland,  Oregon ;  John,  of  St.  Louis,  Missouri ;  Irene  D.,  the  wife  of 
H.  L.  Snyder,  of  Fulton ;  and  Mary  and  Maggie,  who  died  in  childhood. 

Charles  C.  McMahon  acquired  his  more  specifically  literary  education 
by  pursuing  the  public-school  course  on  Prince  Edward  Island  and  in  Lyons, 
Iowa.  He  also  attended  school  in  Fulton  township,  this  county,  and  after- 
ward qualified  for  the  practice  of  his  chosen  profession  as  a  student  in  the 
Northern  Illinois  College  of  Fulton.  There  he  finished  his  course  in  1888 
and  in  June  of  that  year  was  admitted  to  the  bar.  He  then  associated  him- 
self for  practice  with  James  De  Witt  Andrews,  with  whom  he  was  connected 
for  a  year  and  in  1890  he  opened  his  present  office,  where  he  has  since  been 
successfully  engaged  in  the  practice  of  law,  having  a  large  and  distinctly 
representative  clientage  that  has  connected  him  with  much  important  liti- 
gation tried  in  the  courts  of  the  district.  He  prepares  his  cases  with  great 
thoroughness  and  care,  presents  his  points  with  clearness  and  force  and  is 
rarely,  if  ever,  at  fault  in  applying  a  legal  principle  to  any  phase  of  the 
case  at  issue.  Previous  to  his  admission  to  the  bar  he  was  tax  collector  of 
the  township  and  in  1894  was  elected  city  attorney,  a  position  he  has  con- 
tinuously held  to  the  present  time. 

On  the  1st  of  January,  1907,  Mr.  McMahon  was  married  to  Miss  Bertha 
Fischer,  of  Fulton,  a  daughter  of  Herman  and  Mary  (King)  Fischer,  the 
father  a  native  of  Germany  and  the  mother  of  Illinois.  Mr.  Fischer  was 
brought  to  America  by  his  parents  at  the  age  of  eight  years,  the  family 
home  being  established  in  Fulton  among  the  earliest  residents  of  this  part 
of  the  state. 

Mr.  McMahon  gives  his  political  allegiance  to  the  democracy  and  fra/- 
ternally  is  connected  with  the  Mystic  Workers  and  the  Modern  Woodmen. 
He  has  made  a  deep  impress  upon  the  bar  of  Whiteside  county,  both  for 
legal  ability  of  a  high  order  and  for  the  individuality  of-  a  personal  char- 
acter which  impresses  itself  upon  a  community.  An  -excellent  presence,  an 
earnest  manner,  marked  strength  of  character,  a  thorough  grasp  of  the  law 
and  the  ability  to  accurately  apply  its  principles  make  him  an  effective  and 
successful  advocate  in  the  courts. 


JACOB  FELDMAN. 

Jacob  Feldman,  one  of  the  native  sons  of  Morrison,  born  in  1859,  passed 
away  April  3,  1891.  His  father,  Jacob  Feldman,  Sr.,  a  native  of  Germany, 
died  in  March,  1895,  at  the  age  of  seventy-two  years.  He  came  to  Morrison 
in  the  '50s  and  for  many  years  was  actively  identified  with  its  business  in- 
terests as  proprietor  of  a  restaurant.  In  his  later  years  he  lived  retired, 
enjoying  well-earned  rest  from  the  active  cares  of  business.  His  religious 
faith  was  that  of  the  Lutheran  church  and  in  his  fraternal  relations  he  was 
an  Odd  Fellow.  At  the  time  of  the  Civil  war  he  was  drafted  for  military 


LIBRARY 

OF  TH€ 

UNIVERSITY  OF  ILL!«0!£ 


JACOB  FELDMAN,  JR. 


JACOB  FELDMAX.  SR. 


LIBRARY 

OF  THE 

DIVERSITY  OF  ILL!NO!S 


HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY  929 

service,  but  did  not  go  to  the  front  on  account  of  physical  disability,  which 
incapacitated  him  for  active  field  duty.  His  political  allegiance  was  given 
to  the  republican  party.  In  early  manhood  he  married  Christina  Swartz, 
who  was  born  in  Germany  and  survived  her  husband  for  a  number  of  years, 
passing  away  in  1904,  at  the  age  of  seventy-five.  She,  too,  was  a  member  of 
the  Lutheran  church  and  a  lady  of  many  estimable  traits  of  character.  The 
family  numbered  but  two  children  and  the  younger  died  in  infancy. 

Jacob  Feldman,  reared  in  his  native  city,  pursued  his  early  education 
in  the  schools  of  Morrison  and  afterward  attended  a  German  school  at  West 
Chicago.  On  putting  aside  his  text-books  he  entered  his  father's  restaurant 
and  was  associated  with  him  in  business  until  his  death.  He  had  a  wide 
acquaintance  in  the  city  where  his  entire  life  was  passed  and  where  his  many 
good  qualities  won  for  him  favorable  regard  and  popularity.  In  business  he 
was  energetic  and  thoroughly  reliable  and  was  therefore  regarded  as  a  worthy 
representative  of  the  commercial  interests  of  Morrison. 

In  1882  Mr.  Feldman  was  married  to  Miss  Carrie  Schoch,  who  was  born 
in  Geneva;  Kane  county,  Illinois,  in  1860,  a  daughter  of  Christian  and  Mag- 
dalena  Schoch,  the  former  a  farmer  by  occupation.  Both  died  during  the 
infancy  of  their  daughter,  who  was  adopted  by  her  uncle,  Martin  Schoch. 
Unto  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Feldman  were  born  four  children :  Florence,  who  was 
born  in  1884  and  died  in  infancy;  Alonzo  J.,  who  was  born  in  1886  and  is  a 
stenographer  in  Chicago;  Elsie,  born  in  1888  and  now  at  home;  and  Ella 
May,  born  in  1890  and  a  student  in  the  public  schools. 

Mr.  Feldman  owned  a  fine  home  and  business  block  in  Morrison  in 
addition  to  his  restaurant  interests.  Fraternally  he  was  well  known,  being 
affiliated  with  the  Knights  of  Pythias,  the  Odd  Fellows  and  the  Masons.  He 
attained  the  Knight  Templar  degree  in  the  latter  and  the  funeral  services 
were  conducted  by  the  commandery  of  Sterling.  His  religious  faith  was 
indicated  by  his  membership  in  the  German  Lutheran  church,  while  his 
wife  is  a  member  of  the  Presbyterian  church.  The  fact  that  many  of  his 
stanchest  friends  were  those  who  knew  him  from  his  boyhood,  indicates 
that  his  life  was  honorable  and  upright  and  that  he  justly  merited  the  con- 
fidence and  good  will  of  those  with  whom  he  was  associated.  His  death  was 
the  occasion  of  deep  regret,  not  only  to  his  family  but' to  many  of. Morrison's 
residents  who  had  learned  to  esteem  and  honor  him. 


J.   L.    CRAWFORD. 

J.  L.  Crawford,  a  native  of  Lancaster  county,  Pennsylvania,  was  the 
founder  of  Crawford  Brothers'  general  store  at  the  corner  of  First  avenue 
and  Third  street.  Sterling,  in  the  year,  1858.  This  store  was  built  by  Thomas 
Robinson,  president  of  the  AVinnebago  National  Bank  at  Rockford,  Illinois, 
under  the  supervision  of  James  L.  Crawford.  The  two  brothers,  James  L. 
and  David  M.  Crawford,  were  widely  known  and  did  an  extensive  and  suc- 
cessful business  with  the  farming  community.  They  occupied  the  second 


930  HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY 

room  in  the  frame  building  above  mentioned.  They  were  highly  esteemed 
for  their  integrity  of  character  and  honest  business  dealing.  Both  men 
have  long  since  passed  away,  but  their  memory  is  still  fresh  and  dear  to 
many  of  the  old  settlers  who  are  yet  living. 


JAMES  COBORNE  HUBBART. 

James  Coborne  Hubbart,  who  for  many  years  might  well  have  been 
termed  the  first  unofficial  resident  of  Erie,  so  prominent  was  he  in  the  upbuild- 
ing and  development  of  the  village,  passed  away  May  18,  1886,  and  his  death 
was  the  occasion  of  the  most  deep  and  widespread  regret,  for  all  who  knew 
him  had  come  to  esteem  and  honor  him  and  to  appreciate  what  he  did  for  the 
public  welfare.  He  was  born  in  Broome  county,  New  York,  October  12, 
1822,  a  son  of  Elisha  and  Irena  (Coborne)  Hubbart.  who  were  likewise  na- 
tives of  the  east.  Representatives  of  both  the  Coborne  and  Hubbart  families 
settled  here  in  pioneer  times  before  the  land  had  come  into  market.  The  father 
of  our  subject  was  a  native  of  Morris  county,  New  Jersey,  and  in  early  boyhood 
removed  to  the  state  of  New  York,  where  he  resided  until  after  his  marriage. 
Attracted  by  the  opportunities  of  this  section  of  the  country,  which  was  then 
"the  far  west,"  he  came  to  Illinois  in  February,  1838,  and  established  his 
home  in  Union  Grove  township.  He  thus  became  identified  with  agricultural 
interests  in  Whiteside  county,  where  both  he  and  his  wife  continued  to  reside 
until  they  were  called  to  their  final  rest.  Their  family  numbered  eight 
children,  of  whom  James  C.  Hubbart  was  the  second  in  order  of  birth.  The 
family  suffered  many  hardships  and  privations  incident  to  pioneer  life  dur- 
ing their  early  residence  in  this  part  of  the  state.  They  had  left  New  York 
in  the  spring  of  1837,  journeying  westward  by  team.  On  reaching  Mottville, 
Michigan,  however,  their  funds  became  exhausted  and  they  were  compelled  to 
remain  in  that  town  during  the  summer  and  succeeding  winter.  In  the  fol- 
lowing February  they  again  started  for  Whiteside  county,  reaching  their 
destination  about  the  25th  of  that  month.  The  Coborne  family  had  already 
come  to  this  county,  having  arrived  in  July.  1837,  and  had  made  a  clearing 
for  Elisha  Hubbart  of  one  hundred  and  sixty  acres  of  land  located  on  sec- 
tions 31  and  32,  Union  Grove  township.  Upon  this  claim  Mr.  Hubbart 
erected  a  log  cabin,  and  in  August  of  that  year  took  possession  of  his  new 
home.  In  May  of  the  following  year  he  was  called  upon  to  mourn  the  loss  of 
his  wife,  who  passed  away  on  the  12th  of  that  month.  The  father  survived 
only  until  the  8th  of  March,  1841.  The  children  were  all  in  their  minority, 
and  Benjamin  Coborne  was  appointed  as  administrator  of  the  estate. 

James  C.  Hubbart  was  a  youth  of  sixteen  years  when  the  family  arrived 
in  Whiteside  county.  Upon  his  father's  death,  which  occurred  when  the  son" 
was  nineteen  years  of  age,  he  went  to  the  Wisconsin  pineries,  where  he  re- 
mained for  a  year.  Upon  his  return  he  found  that  another  party  had  lo- 
cated on  the  claim  which  his  father  had  secured,  and  in  1845  he  and  his 
brother,  Simpson,  purchased  this  claim,  then  comprising  two  hundred  acres 


HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY  931 

of  land.  They  took  up  their  abode  thereon  and  began  the  development  and 
improvement  of  the  farm,  their  sister.  Irena,  acting  as  their  housekeeper.  On 
the  1st  of  January,  1852,  Simpson  Hubbart  was  married  and  brought  his 
wife  to  the  claim,  and  in  1855  James  C.  Hubbart  was  married.  He  then 
sold  his  interest  in  the  original  farm  to  his  brother,  and  purchased  the  farm 
which  became  his  place  of  residence,  and  which  had  formerly  belonged  to 
his  wife's  parents. 

It  was  on  the  14th  of  October,  1855,  that  Mr.  Hubbart  wedded  Miss 
Maria  L.  Putney,  who  was  born  in  Adams,  Massachusetts,  October  10,  1834, 
and  was  brought  to  this  county  by  her  parents  in  1837,  soon  after  the 
Indians  had  been  driven  away  by  the  Black  Hawk  war.  She  was  a  daughter 
of  Arthur  and  Lucinda  (Wood)  Putney,  both  natives  of  the  old  Bay  State. 
Her  father  was  the  owner  of  a  line  of  stages  operating  between  Adams, 
Massachusetts,  and  Troy,  New  York,  and  on  removing  westward  he  dis- 
posed of  his  business  interests  there,  journeying  by  way  of  the  water  route 
to  Michigan.  For  a  brief  period  he  visited  with  relatives  in  Adrian  and 
there  bought  teams,  after  which  he  drove  across  the  country  to  Whiteside 
county,  Illinois,  settling  in  Erie  township.  He  was  not  long  permitted  to 
enjoy  his  new  home,  however,  for  when  this  was  still  a  pioneer  district  he 
died  of  the  fever  which  was  so  prevalent  in  the  new  country  in  1844. 
His  widow  afterward  married  again  and  lived  upon  the  old  homestead  until 
her  death.  Their  daughter,  Mrs.  Hubbart,  was  the  only  one  of  three  chil- 
dren who  reached  mature  years,  the  other  two  dying  in  infancy. 

As  stated,  following  his  marriage  Mr.  Hubbart  purchased  the  farm 
which  had  previously  belonged  to  his  wife's  parents.  His  first  investment 
in  this  property  made  him  owner  of  one  hundred  and  sixty  acres,  to  which 
he  afterward  added  from  time  to  time  until  his  possessions  included  over 
five  hundred  acres  of  valuable  farm  land  in  this  county.  Upon  it  he  erected 
three  residences,  four  barns  and  other  outbuildings,  planted  an  orchard  and 
made  other  substantial  modern  improvements.  He  usually  kept  about  one 
hundred  head  of  cattle,  making  a  specialty  of  graded  shorthorns,  and  he 
also  kept  from  thirty  to  forty  head  of  cows  for  dairy  purposes.  He  like- 
wise raised  high  grade  horses  and  a  large  number  of  hogs  and  his  live-stock 
interests  were  an  important  branch  of  his  business,  while  his  cultivation 
of  crops  also  brought  him  gratifying  success  year  by  year.  In  addition 
to  his  valuable  home  property  of  over  five  hundred  acres  he  also  owned 
two  hundred  acres  of  land  in  connection  with  Arthur  McLean,  this  tract 
being  timber  and  pasture  land  in  Erie  township. 

Unto  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Hubbart  were  born  three  children:  Mary  I.,  the 
wife  of  Dr.  Eugene  Burridge,  of  Palestine,  Illinois ;  Ella,  the  wife  of  William 
H.  James,  living  on  the  old  homestead  in  Erie  township;  and  James  P., 
also  of  Erie. 

The  conditions  of  .life  in  this  county  at  the  time  of  Mrs.  Hubbart's 
arrival  here  were  vastly  different  from  those  of  the  present  day.  Many 
desperadoes  and  horse  thieves  infested  this  part  of  the  state  and  the  settlers 
had  to  organize  for  protection  against  these  lawless  characters.  Game  of 
all  kinds  was  plentiful  and  furnished  many  a  meal  for  the  settlers,  venison, 


932  HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY 

turkey,  and  prairie  chicken  being  frequent  dishes  on  the  pioneer  board. 
In  those  early  days  there  was  only  one  house  upon  the  present  site  of  the 
town  of  Erie  and  there  were  no  trees  in  the  locality.  All  grain  had  to  be 
hauled  to  Galena  and  Chicago  with  ox-teams  and  travel  was  done  by  private 
conveyance.  Through  the  influence  of  Mrs.  Hubbart's  father's  however,  a 
line  of  stages  was  established  from  Chicago  to  Rock  Island  on  the  north 
side  of  the  river. 

When  Mr.  Hubbart  was  about  twenty*  years  old  he  returned  to  New 
York,  where  he  remained  for  two  or  three  years.  He  then  again  came  to 
this  county  and  owned  the  Delhi  place  until  he  was  married,  when,  as  stated, 
he  removed  to  the  farm  formerly  owned  by  his  father-in-law,  which  is  now 
the  property  of  his  widow.  He  continued  to  make  his  home  there  until 
his  demise  and  figured  prominently  for  many  years  as  one  of  the  extensive, 
enterprising  and  successful  agriculturists  of  the  county.  He  also  built  the 
cheese  factory  which  is  now  conducted  as  a  creamery,  employing  a  man 
to  conduct  this.  He  likewise  built  the  first  grist  mill  in  Erie  and  it  is  still 
in  operation.  For  a  number  of  years  he  conducted  a  general  mercantile 
store  in  Erie  and  at  one  time  was  owner  of  all  of  the  lots  on  the  east  side 
of  Main  street.  His  activity  and  enterprise  made  him  one  of  the  foremost 
citizens  of  the  village,  his  labors  contributing  in  large  measure  to  its  growth 
and  progress  as  the  years  passed.  Without  invidious  distinction  he  might 
well  have  been  designated  as  the  foremost  resident  of  Erie  through  a  num- 
ber of  years.  His  early  political  allegiance  was  given  to  the  democracy 
but  his  last  votes  were  cast  in  support  of  the  prohibition  party.  He  took 
an  active  part  in  good  roads  and  served  as  road  commissioner.  Fraternally 
he  was  a  Master  Mason  and  was  an  active,  prominent  and  helpful  member 
of  the  Baptist  church,  his  entire  life  being  in  harmony  with  his  professions 
as  a  believer  in  Christian  religion.  He  was  never  known  to  take  advantage 
of  another  in  a  business  transaction  but  on  the  contrary  was  always  straight- 
forward and  honorable  and  to  his  family  left  not  only  a  valuable  estate 
but  also  the  priceless  heritage  of  an  untarnished  name. 


JOHN  JOSEPH  McCUE. 

John  Joseph  McCue,  who  owns  and  operates  a  valuable  and  up-to-date 
farming  property  of  one  hundred  and  sixty  acres  on  section  36,  Hopkins 
township,  was  born  in  this  township  on  the  5th  of  July,  1868,  a  son  of  James 
and  Margaret  (Doyle)  McCue.  The  grandparents  were  Thomas  and  Honora 
(Ternon)  McCue,  who  lived  and  died  in  Ireland. 

James  McCue,  the  father  of  our  subject,  was  born  in  the  parish  of  Bala- 
nakiin,  County  Galway,  Ireland,  September  24,  1834,  and  in  November, 
1854,  when  a  young  man  of  twenty  years,  emigrated  to  America,  locating 
in  Whiteside  county.  He  possessed  no  financial  resources  with  which  to  take 
up  the  battle  of  life  in  a  new  country,  but  his  resolute  spirit,  willing  hand-s 
and  strong  physical  manhood  proved  to  be  ample  equipment.  For  the 
first  six  or  seven  years  after  his  arrival  in  this  county  he  was  employed  as 'a 


HISTORY    OF   WHITESIDE    COUNTY  933 

farm  hand,  but  in  1859  rented  a  tract  of  land,  being  successfully  engaged 
in  its  cultivation  for  about  three  years.  At  the  end  of  that  time,  by  reason 
of  the  exercise  of  careful  economy  and  unremitting  diligence,  he  had  suc- 
ceeded in  accumulating  capital  sufficient  to  enable  him  to  purchase  eighty 
acres  of  land,  which  he  brought  under  a  high  state  of  cultivation,  and  which 
eventually  became  the  old  homestead.  As  the  years  passed  he  added  to  his 
holdings  from  time  to  time,  until  he  is  now  the  owner  of  nine  hundred  and 
seventy-three  acres  of  rich  and  productive  land  in  Whiteside  county,  and  is 
widely  recognized  as  one  of  its  most  successful  and  enterprising  citizens. 
About  1898  he  removed  to  the  place  where  he  now  resides,  on  section  19, 
Hopkins  township,  having  here  a  beautiful,  modern  home,  and  being  sur- 
rounded by  all  of  the  comforts  and  many  of  the  luxuries  that  go  to  make 
life  worth  living. 

On  the  1st  of  March,  1859,  Thomas  McCue  had  been  married  at  Dixon, 
Lee  county,  Illinois,  to  Miss  Margaret  Doyle,  the  ceremony  being  performed 
by  the  Rev.  Father  Kinady,  C.  P.  Mrs.  McCue  was  a  native  of  Ireland  and 
a  daughter  of  James  and  Ellen  (Kirk)  Doyle,  in  whose  family  were  the  follow- 
ing children :  Mary,  Margaret,  John,  Patrick,  Catherine,  Sarah  and  Ellen.  In 
the  McCue  family  were  six  children:  William  C.,  who  lives  on  the  old  home- 
stead in  Hopkins  township;  James  E.,  also  a  resident  of  that  township;  Mary, 
who  wedded  James  S.  Quinn,  of  Chicago,  and  died  about  1895;  Thomas  E., 
a  resident  of  Sterling  township;  John  J.,  of  this  review;  and  Edward,  who 
died  when  about  five  years  old.  Mr.  McCue  has  given  each  of  his  children 
a  good  start  in  life.  He  is  now  spending  his  remaining  days  in  the  enjoy- 
ment of  the  fruits  of  his  former  toil  and,  having  lived  in  this  county  for 
more  than  n  half  century,  is  widely  and  favorably  known  as  one  of  its  repre- 
sentative and  influential  residents. 

John  Joseph  McCue  acquired  his  education  in  the  common  schools  and 
assisted  his  father  in  the  operation  of  the  home  farm  until  several  years  after 
he  had  attained  his  majority,  when  he  was  married  and  established  a  home 
of  his  own  on  section  36,  Hopkins  township.  His  farm  consists  of  one  hun- 
dred and  sixty  acres,  and  is  one  of  the  best  improved  properties  in  the  county, 
being  equipped  with  all  the  accessories  and  conveniences  of  a  model  farm 
of  the  twentieth  century.  The  drive  to  the  residence  is  entered  through  an 
automatic  swing  gate  of  the  latest  device,  and  the  cement  walks  and  many 
other  modern  improvements  give  evidence  of  the  enterprise  and  progressive 
spirit  of  the  owner.  The  fields  annually  return  golden  harvests  as  a  reward 
for  the  care  and  labor  he  bestows  upon  them,  and  he  has  long  been  recog- 
nized as  one  of  the  wide-awake  and  prosperous  agriculturists  of  his  com- 
munity. 

On  the  12th  of  October,  1898,  Mr.  McCue  was  united  in  marriage  to 
Miss  Anna  C.  Gronis,  a  daughter  of  Charles  and  Bridget  (McDermott)  Gronis, 
further  mention  of  whom  is  made  on  another  page  of  this  work.  Unto  our 
subject  and  his  wife  have  been  born  six  children,  five  of  whom  are  now  living: 
Mary  Frances,  Jennie  Loretta,  John  Joseph,  Charles  Joseph  and  Leo. 

In  his  political  views  Mr.  McCue  is  a  democrat,  while  the  religious  faith 
of  the  family  is  indicated  by  their  membership  in  the  Catholic  church.  Hav- 


934  HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY 

ing  spent  his  entire  life  in  this  county,  Mr.  McCue  is  well  known,  and  has 
gained  the  respect  and  confidence  of  all  with  whom  he  has  been  associated, 
for  his  life  has  ever  been  upright  and  honorable  in  all  relations,  and  he  is  now 
surrounded  by  many  comforts,  a  beautiful  home  and  a  family  of  bright  and 
interesting  children. 


C.    H.   ATWOOD. 

The  spirit  of  enterprise  and  progress  which  is  dominant  in  the  middle 
west  and  has  led  to  the  rapid  upbuilding  of  this  section  of  the  country  is 
manifest  in  the  life  of  C.  H.  Atwood,  a  leading  business  man  and  representa- 
tive citizen  of  Sterling,  where  he  is  successfully  conducting  an  extensive 
grocery  and  meat  market.  The  success  he  has  achieved — and  it  is  most 
creditable — is  due  entirely  to  his  well  directed  labors,  his  commendable  am- 
bition and  strong  purpose  and  perhaps  no  history  given  in  this  volume  indi- 
cates more  clearly  the  value  and  true  rewards  of  character  and  of  unwearied 
diligence. 

Mr.  Atwood  was  born  in  Ogle  county,  Illinois,  near  Stillman  Valley, 
February  6,  1863,  his  parents  being  Patten  and  Hannah  (McPherson)  At- 
wood, both  of  whom  were  natives  of  Canada.  Their  family  numbered  but 
three  children,  the  eldest  being  Ira,  a  resident  of  Kansas;  and  the  youngest. 
Edward  Atwood,  of  Rockford,  Illinois.  The  father  was  a  farmer  by  occupa- 
tion and  on  coming  to  the  United  States  settled  in  Ogle  county  at  an  early 
day,  there  following  general  agricultural  pursuits.  After  the  outbreak  of 
the  Civil  war  he  espoused  the  cause  of  the  Union  and  became  a  member  of 
a  regiment  of  Illinois  volunteer  infantry.  He  laid  down  his  life  on  the 
altar  of  his  country,  dying  in  a  hospital  in  Buffalo,  New  York.  His  wife 
still  survives  him  and  now  makes  her  home  in  Rockford.  She  is  a  consistent 
and  faithful  member  of  the  Methodist  church,  to  which  Mr.  Atwood  also 
belonged. 

C.  H.  Atwood  was  only  two  and  a  half  years  old  when  he  became  a 
resident  of  Whiteside  county.  Here  he  was  reared  by  James  Scoville  in 
Genesee  township  and  his  education  was  acquired  in  the  district  schools  and 
in  the  business  college  of  Rockford.  He  afterward  took  up  his  abode  in 
Sterling,  where  he  was  connected  with  various  business  interests.  At  length 
he  began  clerking  in  the  grocery  store  which  he  now  owns,  entering  this 
establishment  as  an  employe  in  1882.  When  the  firm  by  whom  he  was  em- 
ployed closed  out  their  business  Mr.  Atwood  became  the  successor  in  the 
enterprise  in  partnership  with  L.  L.  Johnson  and  one  year  later  bought 
out  Mr.  Johnson's  interest,  since  which  time  he  has  conducted  the  business 
alone.  He  has  gradually  developed  a  trade  of  mammoth  proportions,  em- 
ploys a  number  of  clerks  and  does  a  most  excellent  business. 

On  the  20th  of  November,  1886,  Mr.  Atwood  was  married  to  Miss  Clara 
L.  McCallister,  a  daughter  of  H.  W.  and  Annie  (Werntz)  McCallister.  They 
now  have  one  daughter,  Lura,  and  the  family  residence,  is  at  No.  309  West 
Eleventh  street,  where  Mr.  Atwood  built  an  attractive  home  in  1906. 


HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY  935 

The  parents  are  members  of  the  Presbyterian  church,  in  which  Mr. 
Atwood  is  serving  as  treasurer.  He  belongs  to  the  Modern  Woodmen  Camp, 
to  the  Improved  Order  of  Redmen,  to  the  Knights  of  Pythias  and  to  the 
Dramatic  Order  of  the  Knights  of  Khorassan.  He  is  also  captain  of  the 
Uniformed  Rank  of  the  Knights  of  Pythias  and  is  prominent  among  his 
brethren  of  these  fraternities.  His  strongly  marked  traits  of  character  are 
his  close  application,  his  earnest  purpose  and  his  unwearied  diligence.  He 
early  came  to  a  realization  of  the  fact  that  there  is  no  royal  road  to  wealth 
and  he  resolved  to  win  success  if  it  could  be  done  by  honorable,  persistent 
effort.  The  result  is  well  known  to  all  his  fellow  townsmen  and  his  position 
in  the  business  circles  of  Sterling  is  a  most  enviable  one. 


WILHELM  H1NRICHS. 

The  agricultural  interests  of  Mount  Pleasant  township  find  a  worthy 
representative  in  Wilhelm  Hinrichs,  who  is  located  on  the  southeast  quarter 
of  section  13,  owning  here  one  hundred  and  sixty  acres  of  land,  which  is 
known  as  the  old  P.  C.  Stone  farm.  He  also  has  one  hundred  and  forty-nine 
acres  in  Hopkins  township,  and  deserves  much  credit  for  what  he  has  accom- 
plished, his  success  being  due  to  his  well-directed  and  persistent  efforts.  A 
native  of  Germany,  he  was  born  in  Oldenburg,  August  4,  1839,  his  parents 
being  M.  F.  and  Anna  (Johnson)  Hinrichs,  both  of  whom  died  in  Germany, 
where  they  were  respected  farming  people.  Their  family  numbered  four 
children.  Henry,  the  eldest,  died  in  Germany,  but  two  of  his  sons  are  in 
America — Max,  who  is  successfully  following  farming  in  the  state  of  Wash- 
ington, and  Robert,  who  is  a  bookkeeper  in  British  Columbia.  Wilhelm,  of 
this  review,  is  the  second  son  of  the  family.  Wilhelmina  died  unmarried. 
Henrietta  is  the  wife  of  John  Siebles,  a  resident  farmer  of  Germany. 

Wilhelm  Hinrichs  was  reared  in  the  land  of  his  birth,  and  is  indebted 
to  its  public  school  system  for  the  educational  privileges  which  he  enjoyed. 
In  1866  he  came  to  Whiteside  county,  Illinois,  and  worked  for  several  months 
for  Charles  Ward.  He  was  practically  empty-handed  when  he  arrived  in 
America,  but  he  possessed  a  resolute  spirit  and  strong  determination,  and 
early  realized  the  fact  that  all  honorable  success  depends  upon  close  applica- 
tion and  unremitting  effort.  After  remaining  with  Mr.  Ward  for  several 
months  he  was  employed  by  a  farmer  near  Dixon  for  two  years,  and  in  the 
meantime  attended  school  to  some  extent  in  order  to  acquire  a  knowledge 
of  the  English  language.  He  next  went  to  Mount  Pleasant  township,  White- 
side  county,  where  he  rented  a  farm  for  several  years.  He  was  successful  in 
his  agricultural  interests,  and  finally  acquired  capital  sufficient  to  enable  hiri 
to  purchase  the  farm  upon  which  he  now  resides.  He  bought  this  property 
in  1880,  paying  for  it  the  sum  of  fifty-seven  and  a  half  dollars  per  acre,  which 
was  the  highest  price  paid  for  land  in  this  locality  up  to  that  time.  He 
secured  one  hundred  and  sixty  acres,  which  constitutes  his  present  place  of 
residence,  and  here  he  has  followed  general  farming,  raising  both  grain  and 


936  HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY 

stock.  In  1895  he  bought  the  farm  just  across  the  road,  for  which  he  paid 
sixty  dollars  per  acre,  and  he  has  since  made  many  improvements  upon  that 
place.  In  1892  he  built  his  present  comfortable  and  commodious  residence, 
also  has  good  substantial  barns  and  outbuildings  and  uses  the  latest  improved 
machinery  to  facilitate  the  work  of  the  fields.  He  has  added  to  his  place 
many  modern  accessories  and  conveniences  and  his  farm  is  now  an  attractive 
feature  of  the  landscape. 

In  1869  Mr.  Hinrichs  was  married  to  Miss  Eliese  Loss,  who  was  born 
February  23,  1849,  in  the  same  section  of  Germany  in  which  the  birth  of 
her  husband  occurred.  Her  parents  were  Henry  and  A.  M.  (Johnson)  Loss, 
and  the  former  was  a  tailor  by  trade.  They  came  to  Whiteside  county,  Illi- 
nois, in  1869,  settling  in  Hopkins  township,  where  they  lived  until  called  to 
their  final  rest.  The  father  died  in  1901,  at  the  age  of  eighty-four  years, 
while  the  mother  passed  away  in  1883,  at  the  age  of  sixty-five  years.  Mrs. 
Hinrichs  has  one  sister,  Minnie,  who  became  the  wife  of  Henry  Hayen,  a 
farmer  residing  in  Genesee  township,  this  county. 

Unto  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Hinrichs  were  born  eight  children,  of  whom  five  are 
yet  living.  Martin,  born  in  1871,  resides  near  his  father  in  Hopkins  town- 
ship, and  married  Miss  Lydia  Gelken.  Hugo,  who  was  born  in  October, 
1872,  and  resides  near  his  father's  place  in  Mount  Pleasant  township,  married 
Hannah  Minos,  whose  people  reside  in  Sterling.  They  have  three  children- 
Lawrence,  Elmer  and  Louisa.  Nettie,  born  July  18,  1877,  is  at  home.  Adolph 
died  when  nearly  seven  years  of  age.  Willie  died  at  the  age  of  eleven  years. 
Ernest,  born  March  17,  1885,  assists  his  father  in  carrying  on  the  home 
place.  Alma,  born  April  30,  1890,  is  a  student  in  the  high  school.  One 
child  died  in  infancy.  Mr.  Hinrichs  votes  with  the  republican  party  and 
believes  thoroughly  in  its  principles  and  policy,  but  is  not  an  office  seeker. 
He  belongs  to  the  German  Lutheran  church,  of  which  his  wife  is  also  a  mem- 
ber, and  in  the  community  they  are  held  in  high  esteem.  Mr.  Hinrichs  de- 
serves much  credit  for  his  success  in  the  business  world.  Coming  to  the 
United  States  with  very  limited  means,  he  knew  that  if  he  would  win  pros- 
perity it  must  be  gained  through  much  earnest  and  self-denying  effort.  He 
has  put  forth  every  effort  to  achieve  prosperity,  and  as  the  years  have  gone 
by  has  made  judicious  investments  and  is  now  in  possession  of  two  valuable 
farms  which  annually  return  to  him  a  gratifying  income. 


RUBIN  HENRY  RAMSDELL. 

Rubin  Henry  Ramsdell  is  a  contractor  and  mason  of  Sterling,  whose 
labors  have  been  an  element  in  the  substantial  improvement  of  the  city. 
Moreover,  his  life  record  proves  that  success  is  not  a  matter  of  genius  as  held 
by  some,  but  is  the  outcome  of  clear  judgment,  experience  and  unfaltering 
diligenea  for  upon  these  qualities  Mr.  Ramsdell  has  builded  his  present  pros- 
perity. 


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LIBRARY 

OF  THE 

UNIVERSITY  OF  ILLINOIS 


HISTORY   OF   WHITESIDE    COUNTY  939 

He  was  born  in  Rockford,  Winnebago  county,  Illinois,  October  23, 
1855,  being  one  of  the  four  children  of  Winslow  and  Hannah  (Knight) 
Ramsdell.  His  paternal  grandfather,  Job  Ramsdell,  was  a  native  of  Maine 
and  died  in  that  state  when  well  advanced  in  years.  There  were  two  brothers 
who  came  from  England  at  an  early  day  and  settled  in  the  Pine  Tree  state, 
thus  founding  the  family  in  the  new  world.  The  maternal  grandfather  of 
R.  H.  Ramsdell  was  Peter  Knight,  also  a  native  of  Maine  and  a  farmer  by 
occupation.  He  served  as  a  soldier  in  the  war  of  1812,  was  given  a  land 
warrant  for  his  services  and  came  west  at  an  early  day  and  with  his  warrant 
secured  a  claim  in  Winnebago  county,  Illinois,  near  Rockford,  where  he 
spent  his  remaining  days,  passing  away  at  a  very  advanced  age.  He  was 
twice  married  and  his  first  wife,  the  grandmother  of  Mr.  Ramsdell,  died  in 
early  womanhood.  Their  children  were  Sylvia,  Hannah,  Daniel,  and  Wil- 
liam. After  losing  his  first  wife  Peter  Knight  wedded  Miss  King,  and  to 
them  were  born  five  children:  Almeda,  Charles,  Sarah,  Ann,  and  Elzura. 

The  Ramsdell  and  Knight  families  became  connected  through  the  mar- 
riage of  Winslow  Ramsdell  and  Hannah  Knight,  both  of  whom  were  natives 
of  Maine  and  lived  at  Portland.  The  father  was  a  ship  carpenter  in  the 
east.  In  1841  he  removed  westward  to  Rockford,  Illinois,  and  built  the 
second  house  in  South  Rockford,  when  it  was  known  as  Forest  City.  He 
enlisted  in  1861  for  service  in  the  Civil  war,  becoming  a  member  of  Company 
E,  Fifty-seventh  Illinois  Volunteer  Infantry,  under  Captain  Boyd,  but  died 
October  12,  1862,  aged  forty-eight  years.  His  wife  survived  him  until  April, 
1892,  and  passed  away  at  the  age  of  seventy-six  years.  Of  their  family  of 
three  sons  and  a  daughter,  Nathaniel  and  Lucy  are  both  deceased,  the  latter 
having  been  the  wife  of  Albert  Beecher.  Nathaniel  married  Laila  Kemp. 
The  two  surviving  sons,  Daniel  and  Rubin,  are  both  residents  of  Sterling. 
Daniel  married  Louisa  Norton. 

Spending  his  boyhood  days  in  Rockford,  Rubin  H.  Ramsdell  was  a 
student  in  the  public  schools  and  after  acquiring  a  good  English  education 
secured  employment  in  a  brickyard,  where  he  learned  the  brick-maker's 
trade.  This  was  the  initial  step  which  led  to  his  present  connection  with  the 
building  interests  of  the  city.  Removing  to  Sterling  in  1871,  he  engaged  in 
the  manufacture  of  brick  here  for  about  nineteen  years  and  in  the  meantime 
began  contracting.  He  has  supplied  brick  for  most  of  the  large  buildings 
of  the  city.  He  now  has  a  liberal  patronage,  and  as  a  contractor  and  mason 
his  labors  have  been  an  important  element  in  the  adornment  as  well  as  the 
substantial  improvement  of  Sterling. 

On  the  27th  of  October,  1880,  Mr.  Ramsdell  was  married  to  Miss 
Barbara  Smith,  a  daughter  of  Christian  and  Barbara  (Reichenbach)  Smith, 
who  were  natives  of  Wittenburg,  Germany,  and  on  coming  to  America  set- 
tled in  Pennsylvania,  where  they  were  married.  They  arrived  in  Illinois  in 
1851,  taking  up  their  abode  in  Sterling,  and  Mr.  Smith  followed  farming, 
although  he  was  a  tailor  by  trade.  He  rode  from  Sterling  to  Morrison  on 
horseback  to  get  his  naturalization  papers  to  enable  him  to  vote  for  Abra- 
ham Lincoln.  He  was  twice  married,  his  first  union  being  with  Annie 
Pfeiffer,  who  died  leaving  three  children,  while  they  were  still  residents  of 


940  HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY 

Germany.  The  father  afterward  started  for  America  with  his  little  family, 
but  one  child  died  on  the  voyage  and  was  buried  at  sea.  The  others  are 
'  Christ  and  Charles  Smith.  By  his  second  marriage,  to  Barbara  Reichenbach, 
Mr.  Smith  had  one  son  and  five  daughters,  namely :  Mary,  the  wife  of  Arnold 
Mulford;  Frederick;  Barbara,  now  Mrs.  Ramsdell;  Sophia,  the  wife  of  Wil- 
liam Mulf ord ;  Louisa,  wife  of  G.  W.  Rubright ;  Lilly,  the  wife  of  John  Cole- 
man,  of  Chicago.  The  father  died  in  December,  1900,  when  eighty-seven 
years  of  age,  his  birth  having  occurred  September  19,  1813.  His  wife,  the 
mother  of  Mrs.  Ramsdell,  died  in  1870,  at  the  age  of  forty-four  years. 

.Mrs.  Ramsdell  was  born  in  Rock  Falls,  Whiteside  county,  Illinois,  June 
3,  1861,  and  was  educated  in  the  Central  school  in  Sterling.  By  her  mar- 
riage she  has;  become  the  mother  of  eight  children,  five  sons  and  three  daugh- 
ters, of  whom  Hannah,  Lucy,  Thomas  and  Lester  are  still  living,  while  four 
died  in  early  childhood.  Hannah  is  now  the  wife  of  John  F.  Shuler,  on 
the  Pine  Row  farm  in  Montmorency  township,  while  Lucy  is  an  art  student. 
The  parents  are  members  of  St.  John's  Lutheran  church  and  Mr.  Rams- 
dell belongs  to  Sterling  Lodge,  No.  174,  I.  0.  0.  F.,  and  to  the  Knights  of  the 
Globe.  Politically  he  is  a  republican  and  has  served  as  school  director,  but 
otherwise  has  held  no  public  offices.  He  owns  a  beautiful  brick  residence 
at  the  corner  of  Broadway  and  Fourth  streets,  together  with  several  other 
residence  properties  in  Sterling  and  Rock  Falls,  from  which  he  derives  a 
gratifying  income,  having  placed  his  money  in  the  safest  of  all  investments 
— real  estate.  His  time  and  energies,  however,  have  largely  been  given  to 
industrial  interests.  His  business  has  met  competition  in  a  rivalry  of  merit 
rather  than  in  a  war  of  prices.  He  has  put  a  premium  on  high-grade  work 
by  employing  high-grade  workmen  and  paying  them  their  legitimate  share 
of  the  profits  which  their  talents  have  brought  to  the  business.  He  has  aimed 
at  high  standards  in  his  service  to  the  public  and  in  all  of  his  business  rela- 
tions is  above  reproach. 


JOHN  PERSON. 

Jolm  Person,  who  now  enjoys  well  earned  rest  from  the  cares  of  an  ac- 
tive business  life  by  reason  of  his  well  directed  energy  and  enterprise  in  former 
years,  is  living  retired  in  a  commodious  and  attractive  residence  at  No.  207 
East  Seventh  street,  in  Rock  Falls.  He  was  born  in  Skone,  Sweden,  Septem- 
ber 27,  1835,  his  parents  being  Per  and  Ida  (Hogan)  Person,  also  natives  of 
that  country.  The  father  followed  farming  as  a  life  work  and  passed  away 
in  the  land  of  his  birth  at  a  very  advanced  age,  his  wife  surviving  him  for 
some  years.  Their  family  numbered  two  sons:  John,  of  this  review;  and 
Per,  who  lives  on  the  old  homestead  in  Sweden. 

John  Person  acquired  his  education  in  the  schools  of  his  native  land  and 
remained  on  the  home  farm  until  he  had  attained  the  age  of  twenty-eight 
years,  when,  in  the  year  1863,  he  crossed  the  briny  deep  to  America,  having 
heard  many  favorable  reports  concerning  the  advantages  and  opportunities 


HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE   COUNTY  941 

offered  in  the  new  world.  He  first  took  up  his  abode  in  De  Kalb  county, 
Illinois,  where  he  was  employed  at  farm  labor  by  the  month.  Toward  the 
close  of  the  Civil  war  he  located  in  Nashville,  Tennessee,  and  worked  for  the 
government  as  a  carpenter,  being  engaged  in  building  houses  for  the  soldiers. 

In  1869  he  came  to  WMteside  county,  Illinois,  and  bought  a  farm  of 
eighty  acres  in  Hume  and  Tampico  townships,  the  residence  being  situated 
in  Hume,  and  the  outbuildings  in  Tampico  township.  At  the  time  he  pur- 
chased the  property  it  was  a  tract  of  wild  prairie  land,  but  as  the  years  have 
gone  by  he  has  brought  it  under  a  high  state  of  cultivation  and  has  added 
many  improvements  in  the  shape  of  buildings,  fences,  etc.  He  also  bought 
more  land  from  time  to  time,  and  now  has  two  hundred  acres  of  productive 
and  arable  farming  property,  which  returns  to  him  a  good  income.  In 
October,  1905.  he  retired  from  active  agricultural  pursuits,  and  removed  to 
Rock  Falls,  where  he  has  since  lived  in  the  enjoyment  of  the  fruits  of  his 
former  toil,  having  rented  the  farm  to  his  youngest  son,  who  is  now  success- 
fully engaged  in  its  operation.  Mr.  Person  is  one  of  the  pioneer  settlers  who 
bore  an  active  part  in  the  work  of  early  development  and  improvement  here, 
and  he  is  one  of  the  public-spirited  and  enterprising  citizens  of  the  county, 
giving  his  support  to  many  measures  calculated  to  prove  of  general  good. 

On  the  2d  of  November,  1869,  Mr.  Person  was  united  in  marriage  to 
Miss  Lena  Olsen,  a  daughter  of  John  and  Bertha  (Danielson)  Olsen,  and  a 
granddaughter  of  Ole  and  Eliza  Nelson.  Her  grandparents  on  the  maternal 
side  were  Daniel  and  Eliza  Person,  the  latter  living  to  be  more  than  ninety 
years  of  age.  The  parents  of  Mrs.  Person  were  natives  of  Sweden,  and  lived 
in  that  country  until  eight  years  after  their  marriage,  when  the  father  sol 
their  home  there  for  two  years.  On  the  expiration  of  that  period  they  re- 
moved to  Tampico  township,  Whiteside  county,  purchasing  eighty  acres  of 
the  farm  which  he  had  been  operating  and  crossed  the  Atlantic  to  America. 
Mr.  and  Mrs.  John  Olsen  first  located  near  Dixon,  Illinois,  in  1853,  and  made 
land.  The  father  first  built  a  sod  house  which  contained  one  door  and  one 
window,  the  roof  being  made  by  putting  slough  grass  on  poles.  It  was  cov- 
ered with  sod  and  never  leaked,  but  eventually  the  mice  got  into  it  and  be- 
came quite  troublesome,  as  there  were  no  cats  to  be  had.  This  sod  house  was 
considered  quite  a  curiosity  and  neighbors  came  for  several  miles  to  see  it. 
Mr.  and  Mrs.  Olsen  and  their  family  lived  in  that  primitive  structure  for 
three  years,  and  then  the  father  built  a  log  house,  which  he  covered  with 
grass  and  sod.  It  was  later  unroofed  by  a  tornado,  and  he  subsequently  put 
a  shingle  roof  on  the  log  cabin.  Later  he  erected  a  fine  modern  residence, 
and  as  time  went  on  kept  adding  to  his  landed  possessions  until  at  the  time 
of  his  death  he  had  seven  eighty-acre  tracts  of  rich  and  productive  land. 
His  demise  occurred  February  11,  1888,  at  the  age  of  sixty-nine  years  and 
eleven  months,  while  his  wife  passed  away  September  2,  1901,  when  seventy- 
nine  years  of  age.  They  were  widely  recognized  as  worthy  pioneer  settlers 
of  "Whiteside  county,  and  gained  a  large  number  of  friends  by  reason  of  their 
genuine  personal  worth  and  upright  lives.  They  had  a  family  of  eight 
children,  six  of  whom  grew  to  maturity:  Mrs.  Lena  Person;  Oliver  D.  and 
Andrew  Olsen,  of  Tampico  township;  Joseph,  who  resides  in  Rock  Falls; 


942  HISTORY   OF   WHITESIDE   COUNTY 

Augustus,  a  Lutheran  preacher  of  Winncpeg,  Canada;  John  W.,  who  lives  on 
the  old  homestead;  and  two  who  died  in  infancy. 

Unto  Mr.  and  Mrs.  John  Person  have  been  born  four  sons.  William 
Henry,  who  makes  his  home  in  Montmorency  township,  married  Ida  Elmen- 
dorf,  and  has  three  children :  Henry  W.,  Pansy  and  Melvin.  Carl  Oscar,  of 
Eock  Falls,  wedded  Ella  Elmendorf.  Victor  Emanuel,  who  also  resides  in 
Montmoreucy  township,  married  Martha  Murray,  and  they  have  three  chil- 
dren: Lena  Lucile,  Kenneth  and  Bcrnice.  Joshua  Augustus  operates  the 
home  farm,  and  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Flora  Murphy.  All  the  sons 
of  John  Person  were  raised  to  agricultural  pursuits,  and  are  respected  and 
enterprising  residents  of  their  respective  communities. 

In  his  political  views  the  subject  of  this  review  is  a  republican,  giving 
unfaltering  support  to  the  party.  Both  he  and  his  wife  are  members  of  the 
Swedish  Lutheran  church  and  are  widely  and  favorably  known,  for  they  have 
lived  in  Whiteside  county  for  almost  forty  years,  and  throughout  that  entire 
period  their  lives  have  ever  been  guided  by  honorable  and  lofty  principles. 
Coming  to  America  in  young  manhood,  Mr.  Person  here  found  the  opportuni- 
ties which  he  sought,  and  through  their  careful  utilization  he  gained  the 
measure  of  success  that  now  classes  him  with  the  representative  and  prosper- 
ous residents  of  the  county  and  enables  him  to  spend  the  evening  of  life 
amid  all  of  the  comforts  and  many  of  the  luxuries  which  a  modern  civiliza- 
tion affords. 


SEBASTIAN  AUGUST  SCHMOEGER. 

Sebastian  August  Schmoeger  is  now  living  retired  in  Sterling,  and  his 
rest  is  well  merited,  for  through  thirty-nine  years  he  was  actively  connected 
with  commercial  interests  here.  Coming  to  America  from  Germany,  his  na- 
tive land,  at  the  age  of  sixteen  years,  he  afterward  attended  high  school  to 
acquaint  himself  with  the  English  language  and  promote  his  general  knowl- 
edge. While  thus  engaged  he  provided  for  his  own  support  by  labor  during 
the  day,  and  in  that  way  displayed  the  elemental  strength  of  his  character, 
whereon  he  has  builded  his  success. 

•He  was  born  in  Saxony,  near  Meiningen,  November  14,  1850.  His  pa- 
ternal grandfather,  John  Schmoeger,  was  a  butcher  by  trade,  and  followed 
that  pursuit  in  German}'.  Both  he  and  his  wife,  Mrs.  Helen  Schmoeger, 
lived  to  an  advanced  age.  They  reared  a  small  family,  including  Sebastian 
Schmoeger,  Sr.,  who  was  a  native  of  Germany,  and  became  a  butcher  of 
Meiningen.  where  for  many  years  he  carried  on  business,  and  there  passed 
away  in  1894,  at  the  age  of  seventy-five  years.  He  married  Anna  Catherine 
Siemon,  also  a  native  of  that  country  and  a  daughter  of  Johan  Adam  Siemon. 
Her  father  was  a  farmer  by  occupation  and  both  he  and  his  wife  also  reached 
advanced  years.  Their  daughter,  Mrs.  Schmoeger,  passed  away  in  1892,  at 
the  age  of  seventy-two  years.  Both  the  parents  of  our  subject  are  members 
of  the  Lutheran  church.  Their  family  numbered  four  children,  three  sons 


HISTORY    OF   WHITESTDE    COUNTY  943 

and  a  daughter:  Helen  Magdalena,  the  wife  of  Frederick  Weh,  who  is  liv- 
ing near  Meiningen,  Germany;  Frederick  Adam,  who  has  remained  in  the 
fatherland;  Sebastian  A.,  of  this  review;  and  Frederick  August,  deceased. 

Sebastian  A.  Schmoeger  remained  in  Germany  until  about  sixteen  years 
of  age,  and  during  that  time  acquired  a  common  school  education.  In  ISG'i 
he  came  to  the  United  States,  settling  in  Peru,  Illinois,  where  he  attended 
night  school,  and  in  the  daytime  followed  the  butcher's  trade.  He  there  re- 
mained for  two  years,  and  through  his  diligence  and  careful  expenditure  he 
was  enabled  to  embark  in  business  on  his  own  account,  when  he  removed  to 
Sterling  in  1868.  Here  he  opened  a  market,  which  he  conducted  with  grow- 
ing success  until  the  1st  of  October,  1907,  a  period  of  thirty-nine  years.  As 
a  business  man  he  was  thoroughly  reliable,  as  well  as  energetic,  and  the  con- 
fidence which  he  merited  gained  for  him  a  very  desirable  patronage  and  made 
his  success  most  gratifying.  While  he  has  retired  from  commercial  pur- 
suits, he  is  still  a  director  and  stockholder  in  the  First  National  Bank. 

On  the  24th  of  January,  1874,  Mr.  Schmoeger  was  married  to  Miss  Anna 
K.  Salzmaim,  a  daughter  of  Andreas  and  Anna  Martha  (Schuetrumpf)  Salz- 
mann.  Her  parents  were  natives  of  Hesse-Cassel,  Germany,  and  in  their 
family  were  four  sons  and  a  daughter,  but  the  sons  are  all  now  deceased, 
leaving  Mrs.  Schmoeger  as  the  only  surviving  member  of  the  family.  Mr. 
Salzmann  died  in  Germany  at  the  age  of  fifty-six  years.  His  widow  after- 
ward came  to  America  on  a  visit  and  passed  away  in  1893,  at  the  age  of 
seventy-four  years,  her  death  resulting  from  la  grippe.  Her  father  was 
George  Schuetrumpf,  who  died  at  the  age  of  seventy-five  years,  while  her 
mother  was  Mrs.  Anna  Katherine  (Selig)  Schmoeger.  Mrs.  Schmoeger's 
brothers,  all  .of  whom  are  now  deceased,  held  responsible  positions  in  Ger- 
many. George  Salzmann  was  an  officer  in  the  German  army,  and  the  hard- 
ships endured  during  the  German  and  French  war  of  1871  were  too  severe 
for  him,  and  he  died  the  following  year.  John  Salzmann  was  also  an  officer 
in  that  war,  and  died  at  the  age  of  fifty-four  years.  Peter  Salzmann  like- 
wise served  as  an  officer  in  the  German  army  during  that  period  of  hostili- 
ties, and  died  about  four  years  later.  Henry  Salzmann  was  foreman  in  a 
large  soap,  oil  and  perfume  factory  in  Germany.  He  served  as  a  soldier  in 
the  regular  army  and  lived  and  died  in  Alsace-Lorraine. 

Unto  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Schmoeger  have  been  born  five  children.  Anna 
Helen,  the  eldest,  is  the  wife  of  Clare  Fitch,  formerly  of  Sterling,  but  now  of 
Peoria,  Illinois,  and  they  have  four  children,  Marie  Magdalene,  Katherine 
Helen,  Lee  and  George.  Frederick  A.  Schmoeger  is  manufacturing  Sterling 
stove  polish  at  Sterling,  Illinois.  He  married  Florence  Utley,  but  she  is 
now  deceased.  Martha  E.  is  the  wife  of  Lawrence  E.  Gould,  and  they  reside 
in  Chicago.  Harry  J.  is  a  traveling  salesman,  making  his  home  in  Sterling. 
William  G.  is  attending  college  at  Mercersburg,  Pennsylvania. 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  Schmoeger  and  three  of  their  children  are  members  of  St. 
John's  Lutheran  church,  and  Mr.  Schmoeger  belongs  to  Sterling  Lodge,  No. 
174,  I.  0.  0.  F.,  and  to  the  Ancient  Order  of  United  Workmen.  His  po- 
litical allegiance  is  given  to  the  republican  party,  but  the  honors  and  emolu- 
ments of  office  have  no  attraction  for  him.  He  has  a  beautiful  home,  which 


944  HISTORY    OF    \YIIITE 311  :K    COUNTY 

he  erected  in  1880,  and  has  been  a  prosperous  merchant,  being  one  of  the 
oldest  business  men  of  the  town,  highly  respected  for  his  integrity  of  char- 
acter and  his  honorable  dealings.  His  life  record  should  serve  to  encourage 
nnd  inspire  others,  for  he  came  to  the  new  world  empty-handed  and  has  since- 
been  dependent  entirely  upon  his  own  resources  for  his  success.  He  has 
proved  that  obstacles  and  difficulties  can  be  overcome  by  determined  purpose, 
and  that  success  and  an  honored  name  may  be  won  simultaneously. 


JOHN  ROSENGREN. 

John  Rosengren,  a  representative  of  the  farming  interests  of  Coloma 
township,  living  on  section  36,  not  far  from  Rock  Falls,  was  born  in  Sweden, 
April  12,  1858,  his  parents  being  Gustave  B.  and  Marie  (Johnson)  Rosen- 
gren. It  was  in  the  year  1870  that  the  parents,  bidding  adieu  to  friends  and 
native  land,  sailed  with  their  family  for  America  and,  making  their  way 
into  the  interior  of  the  country,  settled  at  Rock  Falls.  The  father  was  a 
skilled  painter,  and  for  many  years  was  employed  by  the  Keystone  Manu- 
facturing Company  at  Rock  Falls. 

John  Rosengren  was  about  twelve  years  of  age  when  his  parents  left  their 
native  country  and  came  to  the  United  States,  so  that  he  was  largely  reared 
in  Whiteside  county,  pursuing  his  education  in  the  public  schools.  After 
putting  aside  his  text-books  he  began  providing  for  his  own  support  and  re- 
mained in  the  employ  of  others  until  he  was  about  twenty-three  years  of 
age,  when  he  was  married,  and  began  farming  on  his  own  account.  He 
has  since  carried  on  general  agricultural  pursuits,  and  his  diligence  and 
energy  constitute  strong  factors  in  the  success  which  has  attended  him. 

It  was  on  the  13th  of  February,  1883,  that  Mr.  Rosengren  wedded  Miss 
Anna  Peterson,  a  daughter  of  Andrew  and  Louise  Peterson.  She  was  born 
in  Sweden  and  her  parents  died  in  that  country  when  she  was  but  three  years 
of  age.  The  year  1872  witnessed  her  arrival  in  America.  By  this  marriage 
there  have  been  born  four  children :  Herbert,  Lloyd,  Mabel  and  Hazel. 

On  beginning  farming  on  his  own  account  Mr.  Rosengren  first  rented 
the  Kits  Miller  farm  of  three  hundred  and  twenty  acres,  and  remained  thereon 
for  a  year,  after  which,  he  took  up  his  abode  upon  the  farm  which  he  now 
occupies  on  section  36,  Coloma  township.  Here  in  connection  with  general 
farming  he  has  made  a  specialty  of  raising  shorthorn  cattle  and  road  and 
draft  horses,  and  his  livestock  interests  have  been  an  important  branch  of 
revenue  to  him.  The  farm  comprises  four  hundred  and  eighty-seven  acres 
of  rich  and  productive  land,  and  Mr.  Rosengren  is  widely  known  as  a  very 
successful  and  prosperous  farmer,  whose  labors  are  carefully  directed,  while 
the  results  that  follow  are,  therefore,  most  desirable. 

Mr.  Rosengren  takes  an  active  interest  in  politics,  and  is  a  stalwart  sup- 
porter of  the  republican  party.  He  believes  firmly  in  its  principles,  and 
does  all  in  his  power  to  promote  it.~  success.  He  is  now  serving  for  the  third 
term  as  commissioner  of  highway.',  and  it  was  through  his  endeavors  and 


HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE   COUNTY  945 

influence  that  the  new  bridge  was  built  over  the  canal.  He  has  been  the 
leader  in  several  political  contests,  and  has  always  been  victorious.  His  de- 
votion to  the  public  good  is  unquestioned,  and  his  loyalty  to  the  general 
welfare  has  been  manifest  in  many  tangible  ways.  He  has  served  as  school 
director  for  several  terms,  and'  is  a  member  of  the  Mystic  Workers,  belonging 
to  Lodge  No.  32,  at  Rock  Falls.  He  may  truly  be  called  a  self-made  man, 
working  his  way  upward  through  determination  and  energy,  realizing  that 
there  is  no  excellence  without  labor,  and  that  in  business,  as  well  as  in  every 
other  connection  of  life,  honesty  is  the  best  policy. 


CHARLES  A.  CLARK. 

While  there  has  been  nothing  spectacular  in  the  life  history  of  Charles 
A.  Clark,  it  is  none  the  less  important.  As  a  merchant  he  has  conducted 
a  constantly  growing  business,  winning  that  advancement  which  comes 
through  indefatigable  energy  and  stalwart  purpose.  He  now  deals  in  hats 
and  men's  furnishing  goods,  having  a  well  selected  stock  at  No.  6  East  Third 
street,  in  Sterling. 

Mr.  Clark  was  born  in  Morrison,  Illinois,  August  10,  1862,  his  parents 
being  John  and  Jane  (Boyd)  Clark,  who  were  natives  of  Fredonia,  New 
York,  and  of  Scotland,  respectively.  The  paternal  grandfather  was  also  a  na- 
tive of  New  York,  and  the  family  is  of  English  descent.  John  Clark  was  a 
young  man  when  he  came  to  the  west,  settling  in  Morrison,  Illinois,  where 
he  followed  various  pursuits.  He  ran  the  first  dray  line  and  later  engaged 
in  the  meat  and  ice  business,  while  subsequently  he  became  an  auctioneer. 
In  community  affairs  he  was  quite  prominent  and  influential  and  his  ability 
as  a  business  man  and  his  public-spirited  citizenship  were  widely  recognized. 
He  was  a  stanch  supporter  of  the  democracy,  filled  the  office  of  alderman, 
and  on  the  day  of  his  death,  which  occurred  November'  21,  1895,  when  he 
\vas  fifty-live  years  of  age,  he  was  ^appointed  to  the  position  of  postmaster 
of  Morrison.  His  widow  still  survives  him.  She  is  of  Scotch  lineage,  and  is 
a  meiTiber  of  the  Presbyterian  church.  In  their  family  were  four  children: 
Charles  A.;  George,  deceased;  Nettie,  who  married  H.  U.  Smouse,  of  Morri- 
son, and  died  February  6,  1908;  and  Walter,  deceased. 

Charles  A.  Clark  was  reared  in  Morrison  and  attended  the  public  schools. 
He  assisted  his  father  in  various  ways  until  he  had  attained  his  majority. 
He  then  began  clerking  in  Morrison,  where  he  remained  for  three  or  four 
years,  and  in  1884  he  arrived  in  Sterling,  where  he  accepted  a  clerkship  in 
the  store  of  R.  B.  Witmer,  in  the  room  which  he  now  occupies.  He  con- 
tinued clerking  for  three  or  four  years,  after  which  he  embarked  in  business 
on  his  own  account,  carrying  a  full  line  of  hats  and  men's  furnishing  goods. 
A  liberal  patronage  has  been  accorded  him,  and  the  business  has  proved  ,\ 
profitable  investment  from  the  beginning. 

On  the  8th  of  July,  1891,  Mr.  Clark  was  married  to  Miss  Lena  B.  Edwards, 
a  daughter  of  E.  P.  and  Grace  Edwards.  They  had  two  children,  John  and 


946  HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY 

Harold  Edward,  but  the  former  died  when  only  five  and  a  half  years  of  age. 
Mrs.  Clark's  parents  were  New  York  people,  and  on  removing  to  the  west 
settled  first  in  Iowa.  They  lived  in  various  places  in  that  state,  the  father 
being  a  railroad  man,  and  their  home  is  now  in  Jewell,  Iowa.  Mrs.  Clark 
attends  the  Episcopal  church. 

Mr.  Clark  is  a  member  of  Rock  River  Lodge,  No.  612,  A.  F.  &  A.  M. ; 
Sterling  Chapter,  No.  57,  R.  A.  M. ;  Sterling  Commandery,  No.  57,  K.  T. ;  and 
Tabala  Temple  of  the  Nobles  of  the  Mystic  Shrine.  In  his  political  alle- 
giance he  is  a  democrat.  With  his  wife  and  son  he  resides  at  No.  302  West 
Tenth  street,  where  he  built  a  good  residence  in  1902.  During  the  years  of 
his  connection  with  Sterling  he  has  ever  occupied  an  enviable  position  in 
business  circles,  as  one  worthy  the  trust  and  regard  of  his  fellowmen,  while 
at  the  same  time  he  has  manifested  enterprise  and  industry  which  have 
proven  the  foundation  of  his  present  success. 


GEORGE  F.  SHULER. 

The  German  nation  has  contributed  probably  more  largely  to  the  col- 
onization and  civilization  of  America  than  any  other  people.  The  stability, 
enterprise  and  indomitable  perseverance  characteristic  of  the  Teutonic  race 
constituted  the  very  qualities  necessary  to  promote  the  growth  and  develop- 
ment of  the  new  World.  As  the  name  indicates,  George  F.  Shuler  in  the 
ancestral  line,  as  well  as  by  birth,  is  a  representative  of  that  race.  He  first 
opened  his  eyes  to  the  light  of  day  in  far-away  Baden,  in  the  village  of  Schil- 
tach,  and  was  a  son  of  John  and  Christina  Shuler,  who  passed  their  entire 
lives  in  Germany.  The  father  was  twice  married  and  to  the  first  union  there 
were  born  four  children,  three  of  whom  are  now  living,  namely:  Maria,  the 
wife  of  James  Frank,  a  resident  of  Rock  Falls;  Maciah,  who  is  living  in 
Morrison,  Illinois;  and  George  F.  Shuler,  who  is  the  eldest  of  the  family. 
To  the  father's  second  marriage  there  was  born  one  son,  who  remained  in 
Germany. 

When  James  A.  Garfield  was  a  youth  he  was  asked  what  he  wanted  to 
make  of  himself.  His  reply  was,  "First  I  must  make  of  myself  a  man." 
He  was  right — for  failure  in  manhood  means  failure  in  life.  Perhaps  Mr. 
Shuler  in  his  boyhood  had  never  heard  of  this  answer,  but  the  same  spirit, 
characterized  him  and  led  him  when  a  young  man  to  seek  the  opportunities 
of  the  new  world  and  to  try  his  fortune  in  the  great  west,  where  advantages 
do  not  depend  upon  the  accident  of  birth,  but  where  men  are  equal  before 
the  law  and  must  rise  by  their  own  merits.  In  the  public  schools  of  his 
native  land  he  acquired  his  education,  after  which  he  worked  upon  a  farm 
for  his  father  until  his  emigration  to  the  new  world  with  the  exception  of 
two  summers,  when  he  was  employed  as  a  harvest  hand.  Before  starting 
for  America  he  visited  other  parts  of  Germany  and  France.  The  favorable 
reports  that  he  heard  concerning  the  United  States,  however,  convinced  him 
that  it  was  the  land  of  opportunity  and  he  therefore  resolved  to  make  it  his 


GEORGE  F.  SHULER 


LIBRARY 

OF  THE 

UNIVERSITY  OF  ILLINOIS 


HISTORY   OF   WHITESIDE   COUNTY  949 

home.  On  the  15th  of  October,  1853,  he  left  London,  England,  as  passenger 
on  the  North  Cumberland,  a  sailing  vessel  plying  between  that  port  and 
New  York.  After  an  uneventful  voyage  of  thirty-four  days  he  arrived  in  the 
eastern  metropolis  and  proceeded  at  once  to  Butler  county,  Ohio,  where  he 
sought  and  found  his  first  employment  in  this  country,  being  engaged  to 
husk  corn  at  thirty-five  cents  per  day.  He  was  accompanied  by  German 
friends,  none  of  whom  could  speak  English  and  they  were  too  timid  to  ask 
for  more  wages.  Later  in  the  season,  however,  Mr.  Shuler  obtained  work  at 
cutting  wood  and  doing  chores,  for  which  he  received  the  sum  of  six  dollars 
per  month  and  his  board.  This  lasted  through  the  winter  and  in 
the  spring  his  wages  were  increased  to  nine  and  a  half  dollars  per 
month.  He  eagerly  availed  himself  of  every  opportunity  to  master  the 
English  language  and  to  acquaint  himself  with  business  and  other  conditions 
that  here  existed,  and  in  the  meantime  he  was  forming  mental  plans  to  come 
further  west.  Although  his  earnings  were  very  small,  by  careful  expenditure 
and  close  economy  he  acquired  a  sufficient  sum  to  enable  him  to  make  the 
journey  and  on  the  last  of  August,  1854,  he  started  for  Illinois,  traveling  by 
rail  to  Mendota  and  thence  by  stage  to  Dixon,  after  which  he  was  taken 
down  the  south  side  of  Rock  river  by  John  Erie. 

On  the  way  Mr.  Shuler  stopped  at  the  place  that  he  now  owns  to  make 
inquiries  concerning  a  man  whom  he  had  known  in  the  old  world  and  who 
had  settled  in  Sterling  township.  Soon  after  his  arrival  in  the  new  country 
a  scourge  of  cholera  broke  out,  from  which  eight  people  died.  Such  a  con- 
dition was  not  an  encouraging  outlook,  but  Mr.  Shuler  possessed  firm  pur- 
pose and  undaunted  energy.  He  eagerly  availed  himself  of  the  opportuni- 
ties that  offered  for  work  and  during  the  first  two  years  after  his  arrival  in 
Whiteside  county  he  was  employed  at  farm  labor  and  thus  made  hjs  start. 

In  the  year  1856  was  celebrated  the  marriage  of  George  F.  Shuler  and 
Miss  Elizabeth  Rorenburg,  a  native  of  Montgomery  county,  Pennsylvania. 
The  young  couple  began  their  domestic  life  on  a  tract  of  land  of  forty  acres 
on  section  9,  Sterling  township,  only  one-half  of  which  was  under  cultiva- 
tion, while  the  only  improvements  upon  the  place  were  an  old  log  cabin, 
sixteen  by  eighteen  feet,  and  a  straw  barn.  Upon  that  farm  they  remained 
until  1859,  when  Mr.  Shuler  purchased  another  tract  of  land  of  forty  acres 
from  L.  S.  Pennington,  thus  becoming  owner  of  eighty  acres  in  one  body. 
He  made  a  payment  of  two  hundred  and  thirty  dollars  upon  the  second  tract, 
but  owing  to  the  hard  times  and  the  failure  of  the  bank  in  which  he  had  his 
money  deposited  to  pay  for  the  land,  he  lost  forty  acres  of  his  property.  A 
year  later,  however,  owing  to  his  untiring  energy  and  good  management,  he 
was  enabled  to  repurchase  it.  In  1863  from  his  tract  of  forty  acres  he  sold 
corn  to  the  amount  of  nine  hundred  dollars,  receiving  a  dollar  and  two  cents 
per  bushel.  In  1864  he  bought  of  Hiram  Platt  another  tract  of  forty  acres 
and  his  possessions  now  aggregated  one  hundred  and  twenty  acres.  In  1870 
he  made  a  purchase  of  eighty  acres  situated  across  the  road  from  his  first 
place  and  upon  this  tract  he  established  his  home.  There  he  occupied  at  first 
a  frame  house,  which  at  the  time  of  his  arrival  in  the  county  was  considered 
the  best  home  in  the  locality.  The  building  is  still  standing  and  is  now 


950  HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY 

used  for  coal  and  wood.  Again  in  July,  1874,  Mr.  Shuler  was  able  to  add 
to  his  land  by  purchase  of  one  hundred  and  forty-five  acres  from  John  B. 
Crawford  and  five  years  later  he  bought  one  hundred  and  twenty-two  acres, 
but  subsequently  sold  twenty  acres  of  this,  which  left  his  landed  holdings 
four  hundred  and  fifty-seven  acres.  In  1881  he  invested  in  an  eighty-acre 
tract,  formerly  the  property  of  Emanuel  Landis,  later  bought  four  acres 
from  David  Wolf  and  one  hundred  and  twenty  acres  from  Abraham  N. 
Landis,  so  that  he  had  seven  hundred  and  thirty  acres  in  all,  which  he  has 
owned  since  1893.  He  now  has  another  eighty-acre  tract  purchased  of  Ben- 
jamin Landis.  This  property  is  divided  into  five  farms,  on  one  of  which  he 
resides,  while  the  other  four  are  leased  and  bring  to  him  a  good  rental. 
These  farms  are  almost  in  one  body  and  all  are  under  a  state  of  high  culti- 
vation and  improvement.  Mr.  Shuler  has  given  much  attention  to  stock- 
raising  and  in  feeding  stock  for  the  market  and  has  made  a  specialty  of 
Poland  China  and  Chester  White  hogs.  He  has  also  raised  the  cereals  best 
adapted  to  soil  and  climate  and  both  branches  of  his  business  have  proven 
profitable.  He  is  now  practically  living  a  retired  life,  enjoying  the  benefits 
of  his  years  of  toil  and  activity  since  he  first  landed,  a  poor  boy,  upon  the 
shores  of  America.  In  1886  he  became  a  stockholder  in  the  First  National 
Bank  of  Sterling  and  in  January,  1887,  was  elected  a  director  and  has  since 
served  in  that  capacity,  covering  a  period  of  twenty-two  years. 

Among  the  other  events  which  have  shaped  his  busy  career,  Mr.  Shuler 
has  been  called  upon  to  administer  a  number  of  estates.  At  one  time  he  was 
in  charge  of  seven  different  estates,  which  were  placed  in  his  care  for  settle- 
ment and  at  another  time  he  had  four.  All  of  this  shows  the  unqualified 
confidence  placed  in  him  by  his  fellow  citizens,  who  recognize  his  excellent 
business  ability  and  his  thorough  trustworthiness  and  reliability.  He  pro- 
moted the  building  of  the  first  iron  bridge  in  Whiteside  county  and  it  was 
through  his  efforts  that  the  first  graveling  of  roads  was  commenced.  He  was 
commissioner  of  highways  for  over  twenty-three  years  and  served  as  school 
director  for  twenty-six  years.  He  cast  his  first  presidential  vote  for  Abraham 
Lincoln  after  becoming  a  naturalized  American  citizen  and  has  always  been 
a  stanch  republican.  With  his  family  he  attends  the  Presbyterian  church. 

Mr.  Shuler  lost  his  first  wife  April  12,  1904,  and  on  the  6th  of  February, 
1907,  he  married  Mrs.  Kate  Delp,  of  Whiteside  county.  By  the  first  union 
there  were  four  children,  namely:  Eliza,  wife  of  Ferris  Landis;  John,  de- 
ceased; Emma  R.,  wife  of  Chris  Miller,  of  Whiteside  county;  and  Mary  R., 
at  home. 

Viewed  by  what  he  has  accomplished,  Mr.  Shuler's  life  seems  remark- 
able, and  yet  when  we  examine  into  the  secret  of  his  success  it  will  be  found 
that  his  prosperity  has  resulted  entirely  from  his  energy,  unfaltering  labor 
and  perseverance  under  the  direction  of  a  well-balanced  mind  and  charac- 
terized by  the  most  honorable  dealings  and  thorough  business  principles.  His 
life  work  well  entitles  him  to  be  ranked  with  those  who  have  been  factors 
in  the  growth  and  development  of  the  county  and  his  name  will  be  held  in 
high  esteem  throughout  the  coming  years,  while  the  present  generation  enter- 
tains for  him  the  warmest  regard.  The  great  majority  of  his  fellow  towns- 


HISTORY   OF   WHITESIDE    COUNTY  951 

men  have  given  to  him  lasting  friendship.  He  has  indeed  exemplified  the 
Garfield  wish  and  made  of  himself  a  man — a  man  whom  to  know  is  to  respect 
and  honor. 


ALEXANDER    McCLOY. 

Although  Alexander  McCloy  is  now  in  his  eighty-second  year  he  is  still 
to  some  extent  connected  with  the  business  interests  of  Sterling  as  a  real- 
estate  dealer.  Well  preserved  for  one  of  his  years,  in  spirit  and  interests 
he  seems  yet  in  his  prime.  He  was  born  in  Lancaster  county,  Pennsylvania, 
October  16,  1826,  and  is  a  grandson  of  Neal  McCloy,  who  was  born  in  Ire- 
land, and  on  coming  to  America  settled  in  Lancaster  county,  Pennsylvania, 
while  his  last  days  were  passed  in  Washington  county,  that  state.  He  died 
at  the  age  of  seventy-five  years,  and  his  wife,  Mrs.  Jane  (Dickson)  McCloy, 
died  in  1833,  when  well  advanced  in  age.  They  were  the  parents  of  two 
daughters,  while  their  only  son,  Alexander  McCloy,  became  the  father  of 
our  subject.-  He,  too,  was  born  on  the  Emerald  isle  and  by  his  parents  was 
brought  to  America  in  early  life.  He  became  a  physician  and  in  1831  re- 
moved to  Allegheny  county,  Pennsylvania,  settling  near  Pittsburg,  while 
later  he  went  to  Washington  county,  Pennsylvania,  where  he  retired  from 
the  practice  of  medicine  and  began  farming.  His  death  occurred  in  that 
county  in  1871,  when  he  was  eighty  years  of  age.  In  early  manhood  he 
wedded  Mary  Henderson,  a  native  of  the  Keystone  state  and  a  daughter  of 
John  Henderson,  who  was  a  native  of  Ireland,  but  both  he  and  his  wife 
died  in  Lancaster  county,  Pennsylvania.  They  had  one  son  and  five  daugh- 
ters, including  Mrs.  McCloy,  who  departed  this  life  in  1871,  at  the  age  of 
seventy  years.  Both  the  father  and  mother  of  our  subject  were  faithful 
Christian  people,  holding  membership  in  the  Presbyterian  church.  Dr. 
McCloy  served  as  assistant  surgeon  in  the  war  of  1812  under  Dr.  Hume,  of 
Lancaster,  Pennsylvania. 

In  the  family  were  seven  children,  five  sons  and  two  daughters,  but 
Alexander  McCloy  of  this  review  is  the  only  one  now  living.  He  was  but 
five  years  of  age  when  his  parents  removed  to  Washington  county,  Penn- 
sylvania, where  he  was  reared  and  acquired  his  preliminary  education.  Later 
he  attended  Jefferson  College  for  one  term.  He  learned  the  carpenter's  trade, 
which  he  followed  for  a  short  time,  and  subsequently  began  clerking  in 
a  store  in  Lancaster  county.  In  1852  he  went  into  'business  on  his  own  ac- 
count at  Strasburg,  Pennsylvania,  where  he  resided  for  about  nine  years, 
when  in  1861  he  arrived  in  Sterling  and  joined  his  brother-in-law,  Zaddock 
T.  Gait,  in  the  dry-goods  business.  This  relation  was  maintained  until  1871 
with  good  success,  after  which  Mr.  McCloy  became  one  of  the  originators  of 
the  Eureka  Manufacturing  Company  and  was  with  that  concern  until  1887. 
Since  that  time  he  has  engaged  in  the  real-estate  business  and  although  he 
has  passed  the  eighty-first  milestone  of  life's  journey  he  still  conducts  a  good 
business  as  a  real-estate  dealer  and  keeps  well  informed  concerning  the  prop- 
erty that  is  upon  the  market. 


952  HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE   COUNTY 

On  the  4th  of  May,  1858,  Mr.  McCloy  was  married  to  Miss  Isabella  Gait, 
a  daughter  of  William  and  Mary  Ann  (Thomas)  Gait.  They  became  the 
parents  of  two  children.  William  Spencer,  the  son,  is  now  secretary  of  the 
Charter  Gas  Engine  Company.  He  married  Miss  Genevieve  Keefer,  and  they 
have  one  daughter,  Isabel.  Mary  Belle  is  the  wife  of  George  M.  Robinson,  of 
Sterling,  president  of  the  Charter  Gas  Engine  Company,  and  they  have 
two  children,  William  Alexander  and  Isabella.  The  mother,  Mrs.  Alexander 
McCloy,  died  February  24,  1888,  when  about  fifty-seven  years  of  age.  She 
was  a  consistent  member  of  the  Presbyterian  church,  to  which  Mr.  McCloy 
also  belongs,  and  his  political  views  are  in  harmony  with  the  principles  of 
democracy.  For  about  forty-seven  years  he  has  been  a  resident  of  Sterling 
and  throughout  this  period  has  figured  in  connection  with  its  business  in- 
terests, while  the  course  that  he  has  pursued  has  gained  for  him  the  confi- 
dence and  trust  of  his  fellowmen  and  gained  for  him  a  gratifying  measure 
of  prosperity  in  the  business  world. 


KARL  J.   MARTINDALE,   D.   D.    S. 

Karl  J.  Martindale,  successfully  engaged  in  the  practice  of  dentistry  in 
Morrison,  was  born  in  Ustick  township,  this  county,  in  1880.  His  father, 
John  C.  Martindale,  was  a  native  of  St.  Lawrence  county,  New  York,  and 
coming  to  Illinois,  settled  on  a  farm  in  Ustick  township,  Whiteside  county, 
where  he  carried  on  general  agricultural  pursuits,  bringing  his  fields  under  a 
high  state  of  cultivation  and  gaining  a  good  financial  reward  from  the  sale 
of  his  crops.  He  retired  from  the  farm  in  1873  and  took  up  his  abode  in 
Fulton,  where  he  engaged  in  the  grain  business.  For  four  or  five  years  he 
ran  a  vessel  on  the  Mississippi  river  and  during  the  administration  of  Presi- 
dent Harrison  he  served  as  postmaster  of  Fulton.  At  the  time  of  the  Civil 
war  he  responded  to  the  country's  call  for  aid,  enlisting  on  the  1st  of  August, 
1862,  as  a  member  of  Company  F,  Ninety-third  Illinois  Volunteer  Infantry. 
However,  on  the  23d  of  February,  1863,  he  was  honorably  discharged  on 
account  of  disability  at  Memphis,  Tennessee.  He  attained  the  rank  of 
sergeant  and  was  a  brave  and  loyal  soldier.  Following  the  war  he  became 
a  valued  member  of  the  Grand  Army  of  the  Republic.  His  political  alle- 
giance was  given  the  republican  party  and  he  served  as  assessor  of  his  town- 
ship. In  his  fraternal  relations  he  was  a  Mason  and  his  life  was  in  harmony 
with  the  beneficent  spirit  of  the  craft.  He  married  Agnes  A.  Lowrie,  who 
was  born  in  Pennsylvania  and  is  now  living  at  the  age  of  sixty-nine  years. 
She  is  a  member  of  the  Presbyterian  church  and  to  her  husband  was  a  faith- 
ful companion  and  helpmate  on  life's  journey.  She  was  called  upon  to 
mourn  his  loss  in  August,  1901,  his  death  occurring  when  he  had  reached 
the  age  of  sixty-four  years.  Their  family  numbered  three  children :  Edward 
L.,  the  eldest,  is  now  a  practicing  physician  of  Clinton,  Iowa.  Walter  P., 
the  second  son.  is  a  member  of  the  bar  at  Quincy,  Illinois. 

Karl  J.  Martindale,  the  youngest  son,  was  reared  to  farm  life  and  pur- 
sued his  education  in  the  schools  of  Fulton,  Illinois,  and  in  the  high  school 


HISTORY   OF   WHITESIDE    COUNTY  953 

at  Clinton,  Iowa.  Determining  upon  the  dental  profession  in  his  choice  of  a 
life  work,  he  began  study  in  the  University  of  Michigan  at  Ann  Arbor  in 
1898  and  was  graduated  on  the  completion  of  a  course  in  dental  surgery  in 
1901.  He  then  located  for  practice  at  St.  Ignace,  Michigan,  where  he  re- 
mained for  one  year,  after  which  he  came  to  Morrison,  where  he  has  since 
remained.  A  liberal  patronage  has  been  accorded  him  and  he  ranks  among 
the  able  members  of  the  profession,  possesses  excellent  mechanical  ability 
as  well  as  theoretical  knowledge  and  at  all  times  keeps  in  touch  with  the 
latest  discoveries  of  the  dental  profession  and  the  inventions  which  have 
brought  dental  instruments  so  close  to  perfection. 

In  April,  1907,  was  celebrated  the  marriage  of  Dr.  Martindale  and 
Miss  Minne  Belle  Robinson,  who  was  born  in  Morrison,  a  daughter  of  Frank 
and  Carrie  (Clarke)  Robinson,  the  former  a  hardware  merchant  of  Morri- 
son. Dr.  and  Mrs.  Martindale  are  well  known  socially  and  have  a  very  warm 
circle  of  friends.  He  belongs  to  the  Knights  of  Pythias  and  his  political  views 
are  in  accord  with  the  principles  of  the  republican  party,  but  while  he 
thoroughly  endorses  its  platform,  he  has  neither  time  nor  inclination  for 
office,  preferring  to  give  his  attention  to  his  professional  duties.  He  is  win- 
ning success  in  his  chosen  calling  and  is  now  accorded  a  gratifying 
patronage. 


HENRY  WHITE. 

Henry  White,  whose  landed  possessions  aggregate  two  hundred  and  sev- 
enty acres,  his  home  being  situated  in  Lyndon  township,  is  one  of  the  worthy 
residents  that  Germany  has  furnished  to  Illinois.  He  was  born  in  the  father- 
land, September  22,  1869,  and  was  but  three  years  of  age  when  brought  to 
the  United  States  by  his  parents,  Henry  and  Dora  Kraken.  The  mother  died 
of  smallpox  soon  after  their  arrival  in  the  new  world,  and  the  subject  of  this 
review  then  went  to  live  with  Mathew  and  Sarah  M.  White,  who  resided  upon 
a  farm  which  our  subject  now  owns.  He  received  from  them  the  care  and 
attention  of  loving  parents,  being  legally  adopted  by  them  and  ultimately 
coming  into  possession  of  the  old  homestead.  It  was  upon  this  farm  that 
his  foster  father  died,  in  1882.  Mrs.  White  still  survives,  and  is  now  living 
in  Nebraska,  at  the  age  of  eighty-nine  years,  with  her  daughter,  Mrs.  Zella 
Slater,  who  is  her  only  living  child. 

Mr.  White  is  indebted  to  the  public-school  system  for  the  educational  priv- 
ileges he  enjoyed  and  he  received  thorough  training  in  .farm  work,  so  that  he 
was  well  qualified  to  take  charge  of  a  farm  of  his  own  when  he  was  enabled 
to  purchase  one.  In  1893  he  bought  one  hundred  and  sixty  acres  and  later 
he  purchased  the  old  homestead  property  upon  which  he  now  resides,  this 
comprising  one  hundred  and  ten  acres.  At  the  present  time  his  landed  pos- 
sessions aggregate  two  hundred  and  seventy  acres  on  sections  3  and  4,  Lyndon 
township,  upon  which  he  has  two  sets  of  buildings.  His  farm  is  largely 
devoted  to  stock  and  in  this  connection  he  makes  good  profit  from  his  invest- 


954  HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE   COUNTY 

rnent  and  his  labor.  In  the  fall  of  1907  he  suffered  a. loss,  having  a  barn 
destroyed  by  fire  but  altogether  as  the  years  have  passed  by  he  has  prospered, 
owing  to  his  unfaltering  diligence  and  persistency  of  purpose. 

In  1891  Mr.  White  was  married  to  Miss  Cora  Pope,  who  was  born  in  Man- 
chester, Iowa,  September  27,  1871,  a  daughter  of  Thomas  and  Mary  Pope. 
They  now  have  three  children,  Ernest,  Ruby  and  Roy.  The  parents  are  well 
known  in  the  community  and  have  many  warm  friends  who  esteem  them  high- 
ly for  their  good  traits  of  heart  and  mind.  Mr.  White  gives  his  political  sup- 
port to  the  republican  party  and  in  matters  of  citizenship  is  progressive  and 
enterprising,  realizing  the  fact  that  earnest  labor  is  the  basis  of  all  desirable 
success,  while  in  his  business  dealings  he  indicates  his  thorough  understanding 
and  belief  in  the  old  adage  that  honesty  is  the  best  policy. 


ELAM    R.    GRUBB. 

Elam  R.  Grubb  is  the  owner  of  an  excellent  farm  of  two  hundred  acres 
in  Genesee  township  and  his  time  and  attention  are  devoted  to  its  further 
development  and  improvement.  He  was  born  April  1,  1842,  in  Pennsyl- 
vania, the  elder  of  two  sons,  his  brother  being  Nehemiah  Grubb,  also  living 
in  Genesee  township.  The  parents  were  Samuel  and  Mary  (Rowe)  Grubb, 
both  natives  of  the  Keystone  state.  The  father  was  born  February  19, 
1816,  while  the  mother's  birth  occurred  December  22,  1805.  Mr.  Grubb 
was  a  cooper  by  trade  and  remained  in  the  east  until  1854,  when  he  started 
westwrard  with  his  family,  proceeding  to  Chicago  and  thence  to  Geneseo  by 
rail.  From  that  point  he  made  his  way  by  stage  to  Sterling,  where  he 
worked  at  the  carpenter's  trade  for  one  year  and  built  the  first  house  in 
the  city,  but  the  structure  has  since  been  destroyed  by  fire.  In  1855  he 
removed  to  Genesee  township  and  purchased  eighty  acres  of  land  on  section 
33.  This  he  improved,  bringing  the  fields  under  a  high  state  of  cultivation 
and  making  his  home  thereon  until  1903,  when  he  sold  his  land.  He  now 
lives  with  his  son  Elam  at  the  very  advanced  age  of  ninety-two  years.  He 
is  in  many  respects  a  remarkable  man,  having  never  used  glasses  and  yet 
still  reading  his  paper.  He  belongs  to  the  Methodist  Episcopal  church  and 
his  life  has  beeri  upright  and  honorable,  winning  for  him  the  respect  and 
confidence  of  all  with  whom  he  is  associated.  His  wife  passed  away  October 
12,  1896,  at  the  age  of  ninety  years. 

Elam  R.  Grubb  spent  the  first  twelve  years  of  his  life  in  the  state  of 
his  nativity  and  began  his  education  in  the  public  schools  there.  He  then 
accompanied  his  parents  on  their  removal  to  the  west,  where  he  continued 
his  studies  and  more  and  more  largely  aided  in  the  work  of  the  home  farm. 
He  was  married  in  1870  and  in  that  year  purchased  forty  acres  of  land, 
where  he  now  lives  and  which  he  has  improved.  It  constituted  the  nucleus 
of  his  present  farm  and  to  this  he  has  added  from  time  to  time  until  he 
now  owns  two  hundred  acres  of  well  improved  land.  He  possesses  much 
natural  mechanical  skill  and  ability  and  this  enables  him  to  keep  every- 


HISTORY    OF   WHITESIDE    COUNTY  955 

thing  about  his  place  in  a  state  of  excellent  repair.  When  farm  machinery, 
fences  or  anything  about  the  house  get  out  of  order  he  has  the  skill  neces- 
sary to  set  things  right  again  and  everything  about  his  place  is  kept  in 
excellent  condition.  The  farm  is  now  a  valuable  and  well  improved  prop- 
erty, from  which  he  derives  a  good  annual  income. 

On  the  27th  of  February,  1870,  Mr.  Grubb  was  married  to  Miss  Eliza 
A.  Peugh,  a  daughter  of  Charles  B.  and  Jane  (Louden)  Peugh.  Mrs.  Grubb 
was  born  October  11,  1848,  in  Indiana,  and  was  four  years  of  age  when 
brought  by  her  parents  to  this  county.  She  has  become  the  mother  of  two 
children:  Charles  L.,  who  is  upon  the  home  farm;  and  Fannie  A.,  the  wife 
of  Earl  J.  Gilbert,  of  this  township. 

Mr.  Grubb  gives  his  political  allegiance  to  the  republican  party  but 
has  never  been  an  aspirant  for  office.  He  has  served  as  school  director  for 
several  years  and  the  cause  of  education  finds  in  him  a  warm  friend.  He 
believes  in  maintaining  a  high  standard  in  the  schools  and  in  employing 
competent  teachers.  His  time  and  energies,  however,  are  chiefly  given  to 
his  business  interests  and  he  now  has  a  valuable  farm  property,  which  con- 
stitutes one  of  the  attractive  features  of  the  landscape. 


MICHAEL   P.    GRAHAM. 

Michael  P.  Graham,  proprietor  and  manager  of  the  Bedal  Gold  Cure  at 
Sterling,  is  one  of  the  native  sons  of  Illinois,  having  been  born  in  Ogle 
county,  near  Polo,  February  15,  1863.  He  comes  of  Irish  lineage  in  the 
paternal  line  and  his  grandfather  spent  his  entire  life  in  that  country.  His 
son,  Owen  Graham,  who  was  born  on  the  Emerald  isle,  being  a  native  of 
County  Roscommon,  devoted  his  entire  life  to  farming  and  in  the  early  '40s 
crossed  the  Atlantic  to  America,  settling  in  Ogle  county,  Illinois,  before  the 
era  of  railroad  building  in  this  part  of  the  state.  His  first  wife  was  a  Miss 
Kenney,  and  unto  them  were  born  three  children,  of  whom  two  are  now 
living:  Mary,  the  wife  of  Lawrence  Kavanaugh,  of  Sterling;  and  Catherine, 
the  wife  of  John  Wentz,  of  Chicago.  Having  lost  his  first  wife,  Owen  Gra- 
ham wedded  Mary  Blouck,  who  was  born  in  County  Mayo,  Ireland.  They 
became  the  parents  of  two  children,  the  elder  being  Nellie  Graham,  now 
the  wife  of  Theodore  Coffey,  of  Greenfield,  Iowa.  The  death  of  the  father 
occurred  February  3,  1903,  when  he  had  reached  the  advanced  age  of  eighty- 
two  years. 

In  taking  up  the  personal '  history  of  Michael  P.  Graham  we  present 
to  our  readers  the  life  record  of  one  well  known  in  Sterling.  He  was  reared 
in  Ogle  county,  Illinois,  upon  his  father's  farm  to  the  age  of  seventeen 
years  and  attended  the  district  and  public  schools  during  that  period.  He 
then  began  handling  horses,  making  judicious  purchases  and  sales  and  for 
three  years  carried  on  the  business.  On  the  expiration  of  that  period  he 
took  up  the  work  of  general  farming  and  stock-raising  upon  the  old  home- 
stead and  biennially  held  a  sale  of  stock.  In  1891  he  established  a  Bedal 


956  HISTORY   OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY 

Gold  Cure  in  Polo,  Illinois,  and  in  June,  1893,  removed  his  business  to 
Sterling.  He  has  treated  many  people  for  the  liquor,  morphine,  opium 
and  other  drug  habits  from  all  parts  of  the  United  States  and  has  effected 
many  cures,  so  that  the  victims  of  these  habits  have  been  reclaimed  for 
lives  of  usefulness  and  honorable  manhood.  In  this  connection  Mr.  Graham 
is  doing  a  great  and  important  work  and  his  labors  are  well  worthy  of  com- 
mendation. 

On  the  22d  of  April,  1885,  Mr.  Graham  was  married  to  Miss  Lizzie  F. 
Vaughn,  a  daughter  of  William  and  Catharine  (Burns)  Vaughn,  who  were 
natives  of  Ireland  and  became  early  settlers  of  Carroll  county,  Illinois.  The 
father  was  a  railroad  man  throughout  the  greater  part  of  his  life.  In  his 
family  were  three  children.  The  death  of  Mr.  Vaughn  occurred  March  24, 
1901,  while  his  wife  survived  until  1908.  Unto  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Graham 
has  been  born  one  son,  Eugene  William  Vaughn  Graham,  who  is  attending 
the  business  college  in  Sterling. 

The  parents  are  members  of  the  Catholic  church  and  Mr.  Graham  be- 
longs to  the  Knights  of  Columbus.  Politically  he  is  a  democrat  but  the 
honors  and  emoluments  of  office  have  no  attraction  for  him,  as  he  prefers 
to  concentrate  his  energies  upon  his  business  affairs.  He  resides  at  No.  307 
Seventh  avenue,  where  he  owns  a  good  home,  and  he  also  has  other  residence 
property  in  the  city.  He  has  conducted  his  Gold  Cure  in  Sterling  since 
1893  and  has  met  with  success  in  this  undertaking. 


FERNANDO  NATHANIEL  BREWER. 

Fernando  Nathaniel  .Brewer  is  a  representative  of  one  of  Whiteside 
county's  oldest  families.  He  was  but  a  year  old  when  his  father,  Daniel 
Porter  Brewer,  came  to  this  county  in  August,  1837,  and  settled  upon  a  farm. 
At  his  old  home  in  Massachusetts  he  had  followed  the  tailor's  trade,  but  after 
his  removal  to  the  west  turned  his  attention  to  general  agricultural  pursuits, 
with  which  he  was  connected  during  the  greater  part  of  his  life.  On  arriving 
in  this  county  all  of  the  experiences  of  a  pioneer  life  lay  before  him.  Only 
five  years  before  had  the  Black  Hawk  war  occurred  and  there  were  still  many 
proofs  of  Indian  occupancy  here.  The  homes  of  the  settlers  were  widely 
scattered  and  many  of  them  were  little  log  cabins.  The  farmer  had  to  depend 
almost  entirely  upon  his  own  skill,  ingenuity  and  labor  for  everything  that 
he  needed  upon  the  farm.  If  machinery  was  broken  he  must  have  the  neces- 
sary skill  to  repair  it,  for  blacksmith  and  machine  shops  were  far  distant. 
The  early  settler  also  had  to  go  long  distances  to  mill  and  market  and  much 
that  was  consumed  by  the  family  had  to  be  raised  upon  the  farm.  After  a 
residence  of  sixty-six  years  in  this  county  Daniel  P.  Brewer  passed  away 
December  12,  1902,  having  for  several  years  survived  his  wife.  Mrs.  Emaline 
Brewer,  who  died  November  19,  1894.  They  spent  their  last  days  in  Port- 
land, living  retired  from  business  cares. 

As  stated,  F.  N.  Brewer  was  but  a  year  old  when  brought  by  his  parents 
to  this  county,  the  family  home  being  established  in  Portland  township.  His 


MR.  AND  MRS.  F.  N.  BREWER 


LIBRARY 

OF  THE 

UNIVERSITY  OF  ILLINOIS 


HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE   COUNTY  959 

birth  had  occurred  in  Berkshire  county,  Massachusetts,  July  23,  1836.  He 
was  reared  upon  the  frontier  in  the  usual  manner  of  farm  lads  of  the  period 
and  locality  and  attended  the  local  schools  of  Portland.  He  remained  with 
his  father  upon  the  home  farm  until  twenty-five  years  of  age,  assisting  him 
largely  in  the  work  of  the  place.  He  early  became  Tamiliar  with  the  arduous 
task  of  developing  new  land  and  as  the  years  passed  by  brought  the  farm 
under  a  high  state  of  cultivation.  In  1862  he  left  home  and  rented  a  farm 
east  of  Prophetstown  and  thus  began  general  farming  on  his  own  account. 
Continuing  in  the  business,  he  became  one  of  the  successful  agriculturists  of 
the  community. 

In  1863  Mr.  Brewer  was  married  to  Miss  Cordelia  Frary,  of  this  county. 
They  have  two  children,  of  whom  Mason  Porter  Brewer,  born  February  7, 
1866,  is  now  conducting  a  hardware  store  in  Prophetstown.  Eva  Emeline, 
born  July  6,  1872,  is  the  wife  of  George  P.  Fisk,  a  resident  of  Prophetstown 
township. 

Since  the  organization  of  the  party  Mr.  Brewer  has  given  his  allegiance 
to  the  republican  platform  and  has  been  called  to  fill  several  local  offices, 
serving  as  supervisor  and  assessor,  while  for  nearly  a  quarter  of  a  century  he 
has  been  scBbol  director,  the  cause  of  education  finding  in  him  a  warm  and 
stalwart  friend.  In  1895  he  joined  the  Masonic  fraternity  and  he  is  also  con- 
nected with  the  Modern  Woodmen  of  America.  His  religious  faith  is  indi- 
cated by  his  membership  in  the  Methodist  church.  He  is  greatly  interested 
in  the  Old  Settlers'  Society,  has  served  on  its  committees  for  forty  years  and 
has  never  missed  one  of  its  meetings.  There  are  few  men  who  have  so  inti- 
mate and  correct  a  knowledge  of  the  early  history  of  this  county  as  has  Mr. 
Brewer,  whose  residence  here  now  covers  more  than  the  Psalmist's  allotted 
span  of  three  score  years  and  ten. 


LUMAN  M.  EAMSAY. 

Luman  M.  Ramsay,  a  stockman  and  agriculturist,  who  also  conducts 
a  meat  market,  resides  at  No.  704  East  Second  street  in  Rock  Falls.  He 
was  born  in  Como,  Whiteside  county,  Illinois,  July  11,  1858,  a  son  of 
William  and  Lucy  Ann  (Church)  Ramsay,  the  former  a  native  of  Rome, 
Oneida  county,  New  York,  and  the  latter  of  Oxford,  Cheriango  county,  New 
York.  The  paternal  grandparents  of  our  subject  were  David  and  Lydia 
(Butler)  Ramsay,  the  former  a  native  of  Vermont  and  a  farmer  and  stock- 
man by  occupation.  They  both  died  when  past  middle  life.  In  their 
family  were  five  children:  William;  Luther;  Plannah,  who  died  in  early 
life:  Euphemia,  who  was  the  wife  of  William  Pratt;  and  Lydia,  the  wife 
of  P.  K.  Marfleet,  of  Prophetstown. 

The  maternal  grandparents  were  Bradford  and  Ann  Whittlesey  (Barnes) 
Church,  the  former  a  native  of  Oxford,  Chenango  county,  New  York.  He 
was  a  farmer  by  occupation  and  an  early  settler  of  Lee  Center,  Lee  county, 
Illinois,  where  he  took  up  his  abode  in  1840.  In  1876  both  he  and  his  wife 
came  to  Whiteside  county,  where  they  made  their  home  with  William 


960  HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE   COUNTY 

Ramsay  until  the  time  of  their  demise.  Bradford  Church  passed  away 
when  eighty-nine  years  of  age,  while  his  wife  died  at  the  age  of  eighty-six. 
Their  family  numbered  five  children,  namely:  Lucy  Ann;  Jane,  who  was 
the  wife  of  Henry  Moore;  Elizabeth,  who  was  the  wife  of  Rufus  Moore; 
Fitche,  who  died  at  the  age  of  eighteen  years;  and  Frederick  Rollin,  who 
died  at  the  age  of  thirty-five  years,  at  Menominee.  He  was  a  very  promising 
young  man  and  a  member  of  the  Wisconsin  legislature. 

William  Ramsay  was  a  farmer  and  stock-drover  throughout  his  active 
business  life.  In  1839  he  came  to  Whiteside  county,  Illinois,  locating  at 
what  was  then  Rapids  City,  now  Rock  Falls,  where  he  remained  until  the 
spring  of  1840.  when  he  settled  in  Hume  township,  purchasing  several 
pieces  of  land,  which  he  improved,  having  about  three  hundred  acres  at  that 
place.  He  removed  to  Como  in  1852,  continuing  there  until  1858,  when 
he  returned  to  Plume  township  and  developed  a  farm  that  is  now  known 
as  the  Pond  Lily  Farm,  making  his  home  on  that  property  until  1897.  In 
that  year  he  came  to  Rock  Falls  and  resided  at  Oak  Lawn  until  the  time  of 
his  death,  in  1900,  when  he  was  eighty-five  years  of  age.  He  used  to  haul 
grain  and  drive  stock  to  Chicago  and,  on  one  occasion  when  he  could  not 
sell  his  hogs,  butchered  them  there  and  sold  them  on  State  street  at  a  dollar 
and  a  quarter  per  hundred. 

Mrs".  Ramsay  survived  her  husband  until  October,  1907,  when  she,  too, 
was  called  to  her  final  rest,  having  attained  the  age  of  eighty-seven  years. 
Both  she  and  her  husband  were  devoted  members  of  the  Congregational 
church  and  when  they  departed  this  life  the  county  mourned  the  loss  of 
two  of  its  most  honored  and  respected  pioneers.  Mrs.  Ramsay  was  a  graduate 
of  Oxfprd  Female  Seminary,  studying  languages  and  mathematics,  was  a 
fine  scholar  and  taught  a  select  school  in  Dixon  for  some  time.  She  was  a 
great  reader  and  a  woman  of  wide  general  information,  so  that  her  advice 
was  sought  by  the  people  of  the  neighborhood  on  all  kinds  of  subjects,  for 
her  excellent  education  made  her  opinions  valuable.  She  possessed  a  re- 
tentive memory  and  was,  moreover,  a. lady  of  refinement  and  great  force  of 
character,  which  latter  quality  strongly  manifested  itself  when  she  became 
a  pioneer  of  Whiteside  county  and  established  a  home  in  the  wilderness. 
She  proved  an  able  helpmate  and  wise  counselor  to  her  husband,  a  good  wife, 
a  loving  mother,  an  exemplary  Christian  and  was  held  in  the  highest  esteem 
by  all  with  whom  she  came  in  contact.  She  was  a  great  aid  to  her  husband 
in  accumulating  a  competency  for  their  declining  years.  The  pioneer  women, 
as  well  as  men,  are  entitled  to  great  credit  for  the  part  they  bore  in  building 
up  a  new  country  and  Mrs.  Ramsay's  far-reaching  influence  for  good  was 
recognized  by  all  who  knew  her.  Both  she  and  her  husband  deserve  much 
praise  for  their  courage,  patience  and  perseverance  in  accomplishing  what 
they  started  out  in  life  to  do,  namely:  to  accumulate  a  competence  for  old 
age,  to  rear  their  family  to  become  useful  and  respected  citizens  and  to 
leave  to  posterity  a  noble  example  and  an  untarnished  name.  Their  children, 
to  each  of  whom  they  gave  a  good  start  in  life,  were  five  in  number :  William 
F.,  of  Blue  Hill,  Mitchell  county,  Kansas;  Kate  and  Elizabeth,  of  Rock 
Falls;  Luman  M.,  of  this  review;  and  Luther,  who  died  in  infancy. 


HISTORY   OF   WHITESIDE    COUNTY  961 

Luman  M.  Ramsay  was  reared  on  his  father's  farm  in  Hume  township, 
and  supplemented  the  education  which  he  received  in  the  district  schools  by 
a  course  in  the  Sterling  Business  College.  He  carried  on  agricultural  pur- 
suits until  1897,  when  he  came  with  his  parents  to  Rock  Falls,  where  he 
has  since  made  his  home,  his  sisters,  Kate  and  Elizabeth,  residing  with  him 
in  the  old  home  of  their  parents.  In  1905  he  purchased  the  meat  market 
of  N.  S.  Beecher  and  has  since  conducted  the  same  with  good  success.  He 
also  buys  and  sells  considerable  stock  and  in  his  business  interests  has  gained 
a  gratifying  measure  of  prosperity  because  of  his  industry  and  excellent 
management.  In  connection  with  his  sisters  he  owns  a  farm  of  three  hundred 
and  twenty  acres  which  is  situated  partly  in  Whiteside  county  and  partly 
in  Henry  county  and  is  known  as  the  Cloverland  farm.  In  addition  to  their 
attractive  home  in  Rock  Falls  they  also  have  four  acres  of  ground,  and 
the  hospitality  which  they  dispense  so  freely  is  just  as  cordially  extended  to 
them  by  their  many  friends.  For  a  half  century,  or  throughout  the  entire 
period  of  his  life,  Mr.  Ramsay  has  been  a  resident  of  this  county  and  is  a 
credit  to  the  name  which  has  been  an  honored  one  here  for  almost  three 
score  years  and  ten. 


JOHN  G.  WETZEL. 

John  G.  Wetzel,  secretary  of  the  Whiteside  Building  &  Loan  Association 
of  Sterling  and  engaged  also  in  the  insurance,  renting  and  loan  business, 
was  born  in  Hopkins  township,  Whiteside  county,  Illinois,  November  1, 
1869,  his  parents  being  Lewis  and  Mary  (Lawyer)  Wetzel,  who  .were  natives 
of  Ohio.  The  paternal  grandfather  was  a  native  of  Pennsylvania,  whence 
he  removed  to  Ohio,  while  at  a  later  date  he  became  a  resident  of  Whiteside 
county,  Illinois,  where  he  died  at  an  advanced  age,  while  his  wife  reached 
the  remarkable  old  age  of  ninety-two  years. 

Lewis  Wetzel,  the  father  of  our  subject,  carried  on  farming  in  Tus- 
carawas  county,  Ohio,  and  came  to  Whiteside  county,  Illinois,  in  the  early 
:50s  with  his  parents  who  settled  first  on  a  farm  in  Genesee  township,  near 
Coleta.  Later  Lewis  Wetzel  removed  to  Hopkins  township,  where  he  pur- 
chased two  hundred  acres  of  land,  upon  which  he  resided  until  the  fall  of 
1888.  About  twenty  years .  ago  he  retired  from  the  farm  and  removed  to 
Gait,  Illinois,  where  he  still  resides,  having  spent  the  last  two  decades  in 
the  enjovment  of  a  rest  which  he  has  truly  earned  and  richly  deserves'.  He 
has  held  various  township  offices  and  has  been  a  man  of  considerable  in- 
fluence in  his  community.  Unto  him  and  his  wife  were  born  four  children: 
Rebecca,  the  deceased  wife  of  W.  A.  Mensch,  her  death  occurring  July  12, 
1893;  Delilah,  the  wife  of  N.  J.  Reed,  of  Emerson,  Illinois;  John  G.,  of 
Sterling;  and  Rollin  E.,  who  resides  in  St.  Paul,  Minnesota. 

John  G.  Wetzel  spent  his  boyhood  and  youth  in  the  usual  manner  of 
farm  lads,  early  becoming  familiar  with  the  duties  and  labors  that  fall  to 
the  lot  of  the  agriculturist.  He  attended  the  district  schools  and  later 


962  HISTORY   OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY 

supplemented  his  early  educational  advantages  by  study  in  Dixon  Business 
College  and  in  Sterling  Business  College,  completing  his  course  in  each.  He 
then  began  keeping  the  books  for  the  Eureka  Company  of  Rock  Falls, 
with  which  he  remained  for  two  years,  while  subsequently  he  was  book- 
keeper in  the  Gait  &  Tracy  Bank,  there  continuing  until  the  firm  became 
Gait  &  Son.  In  the  fall  of  1896  he  became  secretary  of  the  Whiteside 
County  Building  &  Loan  Association  and  has  since  acted  in  that  capacity. 
In  addition  to  this  he  conducts  an  independent  loan  and  insurance  business 
and  annually  writes  many  fire  policies  and  also  has  succeeded  in  placing 
many  loans. 

On  the  20th  of  June,  1895,  Mr.  Wetzel  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss 
Dora  A.  Whipple,  daughter  of  Monroe  and  Annie  (McKin)  Whipple.  There 
were  three  children  born  of  that  union,  Dorothy  May,  Harriet  E.  and  John 
Monroe  Wetzel. 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  Wetzel  are  members  of  the  Presbyterian  church  and  are 
people  of  genuine  personal  worth,  for  whom  their  fellow  townsmen  enter- 
tain the  warmest  regard.  Mr.  Wetzel  is  also  a  director  of  the  Young  Men's 
Christian  Association  and  is  identified  with  various  fraternal  organizations. 
He  belongs  to  Rock  River  Lodge,  No.  612,  A.  F.  &  A.  M. ;  Sterling  Chapter, 
No.  57,  R.  A.  M.;  Sterling  Commandery,  No.  57,  K.  T. ;  and  Medinah 
Temple  of  the  Mystic  Shrine,  in  Chicago.  He  is  likewise  connected  with 
Sterling  Lodge,  No.  174,  I.  0.  0.  F.  His  political  allegiance  is  given  to 
the  republican  party  and  he  is  now  serving  as  a  member  of  the  town  central 
committee.  He  is  also  assistant  supervisor  of  Sterling  township  and  is  actively 
and  helpfully  interested  in  many  movements  relating  to  the  general  welfare. 
In  fact  he  stands  for  progress  and  advancement  in  citizenship  as  well  as 
in  business  life  and  the  fact  that  many  of  his  warmest  friends  are  those 
who  have  known  him  from  his  youth  to  the  present  indicates  that  his  has 
been  an  honorable  career. 


DAVID  MATHEW. 

While  David  Mathew  has  put  aside  the  more  active  work  of  the  farm,  he 
is  still  the  owner  of  a  valuable  property  of  three  hundred  and  twenty  acres 
on  sections  1  and  12,  Mount  Pleasant  township.  There  for  many  years  he 
carried  on  general  agricultural  pursuits  and  the  place  is  now  operated  by  his 
son  George  W.  He  also  owns  the  W.  C.  Thomas  farm  of  two  hundred  and 
eighty  acres  on  sections  8  and  9,  Mount  Pleasant  township,  which  is  being 
cultivated  by  his  son  David  W.  Mr.  Mathew  makes  his  home  upon  a  tract 
of  land  of  sixteen  acres  in  the  village  of  Round  Grove  and  the  fruits  of  his 
former  toil  now  supply  him  with  all  of  the  comforts  and  some  of  the  luxuries 
of  life. 

A  native  of  Scotland,  he  was  born  in  Fifeshire,  June  3,  1824,  his  parents 
being  William  and  Janet  (Wylie)  Mathew,  who  came  to  America  some  years 
after  the  arrival  of  their  son  David.  They  took  up  their  abode  in  Tucker 
county,  West  Virginia,  in  1851,  and  in  1857  came  to  Whiteside  county,  Illi- 


HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY  963 

nois,  settling  in  Hopkins  township,  where  the  mother  died,  while  the  father 
passed  away  in  Mount  Pleasant  township.  Their  children  were  Thomas,  David, 
William,  Janet,  Andrew,  Margaret,  Ann,  Jane,  Robert  and  Alexander. 

David  Mathew  was  reared  and  educated  in  Scotland,  remaining  upon  the 
home  farm  until  sixteen  years  of  age.  He  was  a  young  man  of  twenty-four 
years  when  he  crossed  the  Atlantic  to  the  new  world  in  1848,  arriving  in  New 
York.  Continuing  his  residence  in  the  east  for  some  time  he  taught  school 
for  several  terms  in  Maryland  and  afterward  became  connected  with  repair 
work  on  the  Baltimore  &  Ohio  Railroad.  He  followed  that  pursuit  for  several 
years  and  finally  invested  his  savings  in  two  hundred  acres  of  land  in  Tucker 
county,  West  Virginia,  where  he  carried  on  general  farming  for  some  time. 
Thinking,  however,  to  enjoy  better  opportunities  in  the  middle  west,  he  dis- 
posed of  his  interests  in  Tucker  county  and  in  1860  came  to  Whiteside  coun- 
ty, where  for  five  years  he  engaged  in  the  cultivation  of  a  rented  farm  of 
eighty  acres.  He  then  bought  eighty  acres  on  section  1,  Mount  Pleasant  town- 
ship, for  which  he  paid  sixteen  dollars  per  acre.  To  this  he  has  added,  and, 
becoming  owner  of  various  farms,  his  landed  possessions  now  aggregate  more 
than  thirteen  hundred  acres.  In  addition  to  a  farm  of  three  hundred  and 
twenty  acres  in  Mount  Pleasant,  now  operated  by  his  son  George,  and  a  farm 
of  two  hundred  and  eighty  acres  on  sections  8  and  9,  Mount  Pleasant  town- 
ship, which  he  purchased  in  1900  and  which  is  now  cultivated  by  his  son 
David  W.,  he  also  has  a  farm  of  one  hundred  and  sixty  acres  in  Union  Grove 
township,  which  is  operated  by  his  son  Samuel.  He  also  owns  several  hundred 
acres  east  of  Round  Grove  in  Hopkins  and  Mount  Pleasant  townships,  that 
in  Hopkins  being  farmed  by  his  son  Robert  while  a  farm  in  Mount  Pleasant 
is  operated  by  his  son  Simon,  and  his  farming  interests  return  to  him  an  excel- 
lent income  upon  his  investments.  He  has  displayed  keen  discernment  in  the 
purchase  of  his  property,  being  seldom  if  ever  at  fault  in  matters  of  judg- 
ment regarding  land  values.  He  was  active  in  business  for  many  years  and 
his  energy,  enterprise  and  keen  discrimination  are  manifest  in  the  splendid 
success  which  has  come  to  him. 

Mr.  Mathew  was  married  in  Virginia  to  Miss  Anne  Wolf,  whose  people 
were  from  Holland.  Mrs.  Mathew  was  probably  a  descendant  of  General 
Wolf,  and  was  a  daughter  of  George  A.  and  Catherine  (Barb)  Wolf.  She  was 
born  in  Tucker  count}',  West  Virginia,  and  died  in  this  county  in  1901.  Un- 
to Mr.  and  Mrs.  Mathew  were  born  thirteen  children :  William  B.,  who  owns 
a  farm  near  Round  Grove;  Janet  and  George,  twins,  the  latter  now  deceased, 
while  the  former  is  residing  with  her  father ;  Catherine,  deceased ;  Robert, 
a  farmer  near  Round  Grove;  Mrs.  Mary  Sherman,  who  is  living  in  Ames, 
Iowa;  Anna,  who  is  engaged  in  dressmaking  in  Morrison;  David  W.,  who  is 
operating  the  Thomas  farm  owned  by  his  father;  George  W.,  twin  brother  of 
David  and  now  successfully  carrying  on  general  farming  on  the  home  place 
in  Mount  Pleasant  township;  James  A.,  of  Round  Grove,  who  operates  an  ele- 
vator and  is  meeting  with  prosperity  as  a  grain  buyer;  Ezra,  who  is  assistant 
cashier  of  the  Sterling  Bank;  Simon,  who  operates  a  farm  belonging  to  his 
father  east  of  Round  Grove;  and  Samuel,  twin  brother  of  Simon,  and  now 
cultivating  a  part  of  his  father's  land  in  Union  Grove  township. 


964  HISTORY    OF    WHITESIDE    COUNTY 

Mr.  Mathew  gave  his  early  political  allegiance  to  the  democracy  and  for 
many  years  has  been  a  stalwart  republican.  He  voted  for  Buchanan  in  1856 
but  since  that  time  has  given  his  allegiance  to  the  men  whose  names  have 
headed  the  national  republican  ticket.  He  has  served  as  school  director  for  a 
number  of  years  and  the  cause  of  education  has  found  in  him  a  stalwart 
friend.  In  early  life  he  was  connected  with  the  Odd  Fellows  society  but  is 
not  active  in  his  relations  therewith  at  the  present  time.  He  has  been  a  life- 
long member  of  the  Presbyterian  church  and  his  daily  conduct  has  been  in 
strict  conformity  to  its  teachings.  In  his  business  he  has  been  thoroughly 
reliable  and  while  he  has  met  success  it  ha?  come  to  him  by  reason  of  honor- 
able methods  that  may  well  be  followed  by  others.  His  prosperity  has  resulted 
from  judicious  investment  and  from  untiring  energy  and  gradually  he  has 
worked  his  way  upward  until  he  is  now  one  of  the  most  extensive  landowners 
of  the  county. 


APPLETON  RICH  LEWIS. 

Appleton  Rich  Lewis,  engaged  in  the  real-estate  business  and  also  man- 
ager of  the  auditorium  of  Morrison,  was  born  in  Union  Grove  township  in  1858. 
His  father,  Mitchell  Y.  Lewis,  was  a  native  of  Knox  county,  Ohio,  born  July 
1,  1820,  and  was  of  Welsh  ancestry.  He  became  a  carpenter  and  contractor 
but  in  early  life  worked  as  a  cabinet-maker  and  joiner.  He  made  the  trip  from 
Ohio  to  Illinois  on  horseback  in  1854  to  look  over  the  country  and,  being 
pleased  with  its  prospects,  the  following  year  he  brought  his  family  to  Morri- 
son, where  he  remained  for  a  short  time.  He  then  rented  a  farm  in  Union 
Grove  township,  cultivating  that  land  until  1865,  when  he  resumed  work  at 
his  trade,  which  he  followed  for  some  time.  In  November,  1844,  he  wedded 
Martha.  J.  Lane,  a  native  of  New  Jersey  and  of  Irish  descent.  In  1894  they 
celebrated  their  golden  wedding,  at  which  were  present  their  six  children,  the 
minister  who  married  them  and  also  guests  who  witnessed  the  marriage  cere- 
mony. Up  to  that  time  there  had  not  been  a  death  in  the  family  and  Mr. 
Lewis  was  the  first  one  to  depart  this  life,  dying  on  the  eightieth  anniversary 
of  his  birth.  He  and  his  wife  had  traveled  life's  journey  together  for  about 
fifty-six  years.  In  his  fraternal  relations  he  was  a  Mason  and  on  the  seventy- 
fifth  anniversary  of  his  birth,  Dunlap  Lodge,  A.  F.  &  A.  M.,  of  Morrison, 
set  aside  all  rules  and  made  him  an  honorary  member  of  that  organization. 
His  early  political  allegiance  was  given  the  democracy  prior  to  1856,  when  he 
voted  for  John  C.  Fremont,  the  pathfinder,  and  ever  afterward  gave  his  politi- 
cal allegiance  to  the  republican  party.  He  had  no  aspiration  for  office  but  was 
always  loyal  and  progressive  in  citizenship  and  was  a  man  strictly  honest  in 
his  dealings,  his  upright  life  winning  for  him  the  esteem  and  confidence  of 
his  neighbors  and  friends.  His  wife  survived  him  until  December,  1904,  pass- 
ing away  in  her  seventy-ninth  year.  She  was  a.  member  of  the  Presbyterian 
church  and  a  most  estimable  lady.  In  their  family  were  three  sons  and  three 
daughters:  Mary,  the  wife  of  Theodore  W.  McDaniel,  of  Morrison;  Elizabeth, 


HISTORY    OF   WHITESIDE    COUNTY  965 

the  widow  of  Aaron  H.  Martin,  who  also  makes  her  home  in  Morrison;  John 
W.,  a  carpenter  of  Tulsa,  Indian  Territory;  William  H.,  who  is  a  painter  of 
Morrison;  Jennie  M.,  who  is  the  wife  of  Rev.  Glenvoie  McQueen,  a  minister 
of  the  Presbyterian  church  at  Versailles,  Indiana ;  and  Appleton  Rich,  of  this 
review. 

The  last  named  lived  upon  a  farm  in  this  county  for  six  years  in  his 
early  boyhood  and  afterward  attended  the  common  schools  of  Morrison. 
At  the  age  of  sixteen  he  entered  the  office  of  the  Morrison  Sentinel,  where 
he  remained  for  six  years,  becoming  thoroughly  acquainted  with  the  art 
preservative,  gradually  working  his  way  upward  until  he  was  foreman  of 
the  office.  Entering  the  drug  store  of  A.  H.  Martin,  he  then  acquainted  him- 
self with  that  line  of  business  and  passed  a  state  examination  before  the 
state  board  of  pharmacy  in  1888.  In  the  fall  of  the  following  year  he 
formed  a  partnership  with  J.  H.  Snyder  and  purchased  the  Martin  store. 
They  conducted  business  together  for  more  than  eleven  years  under  the  firm 
style  of  J.  H.  Snyder  &  Company,  after  which  Mr.  Lewis  retired  from  the 
firm  on  the  1st  of  January,  1900,  and  engaged  in  the  cigar  and  tobacco 
business.  He  also  assumed  the  management  of  the  Morrison  auditorium. 
He  continued  in  the  tobacco  trade  until  1904,  after  which  he  spent  about 
two  years  at  Tulsa,  Indian  Territory,  purchasing  some  property  there.  He 
then  returned  to  Morrison  and  since  the  early  part  of  1907  has  been  en- 
gaged in  the  real-estate  business,  thoroughly  acquainting  himself  with  the 
value  of  property  and  negotiating  a  number  of  realty  transfers  during  the 
past  year.  He  is  also  manager  of  the  auditorium  and  is  well  known  in 
the  business  circles  of  this  city,  while  his  strongly  marked  characteristics  are 
such  as  have  gained  for  him  personal  popularity. 

Mr.  Lewis  is  a  member  of  the  Masonic  fraternity,  the  Odd  Fellows  Lodge, 
the  Dixon  Lodge  of  Elks  and  Sterling  commandery,  K.  T.  His  political 
allegiance  is  given  to  the  republican  party  and  he  has  been  somewhat  promi- 
nent in  its  local  ranks.  Three  times  he  has  been  elected  city  treasurer 
and  proved  himself  a  most  faithful  custodian  of  the  public  funds.  He  has 
a  wide  acquaintance  in  this  county  and  is  recognized  as  one  of  its  represent- 
ative citizens. 


ROBERT  R.  SP AFFORD. 

Robert  R.  Spafford  is  one  of  Morrison's  native  sons,  who  throughout  his 
entire  life,  since  completing  his  education,  has  been  identified  with  its 
business  interests.  Born  in  this  city  in  1874,  his  parents  were  D.  S.  and 
Lydia  Spafford,  of  whom  mention  is  made  elsewhere  in  this  work.  At 
the  usual  age  he  became  a  pupil  in  the  public  schools  and  was  graduated 
from  Oberlin  (Ohio)  Academy,  while  later  he  attended  the  Rose  Polytechnic 
School  at  Terre  Haute,  Indiana.  Well  equipped  by  liberal  educational  ad- 
vantages for  life's  practibal  and  responsible  duties,  after  completing  his 
education  he  engaged  with  a  company  in  installing  electric  light  plants  for 


966  HISTORY   OF    WHITES1DE    COUNTY 

two  years.  He  afterward  spent  three  years  in  his  father's  store  as  bookkeeper 
and  was  with  the  firm  of  Potter  &  Johnson,  lumber  and  grain  dealers,  as 
bookkeeper  for  six  years.  In  1906  he  entered  into  partnership  with  C.  D. 
Gallentine,  becoming  a  member  of  the  C.  D.  Gallentine  Company,  having  a 
hot  house  forcing  plant,  with  a  total  of  one  hundred  and  twenty-five  thousand 
square  feet  of  glass.  The  business  has  gradually  developed  under  th